August 21, 2014 at 6:49 pm

Preparing your child for modern bullying

Posted by in Uncategorized

By
KBJR News 1

Preparing your child for modern bullying

August 21, 2014

Updated Aug 21, 2014 at 11:54 AM CDT

Duluth, MN (NNCNOW.com) — Bullying is no longer just on the playground, social media is providing online channels for negative interactions. More than half of teens report they have witnessed online bullying.

“The best way adults can help their children is to be aware of the potential sources of bullying,” Peggy Caruso, a life coach and author, said.

She adds that those signs include a child who seems withdrawn, lacks the desire to interact with others or exhibits extreme changes in behavior.

In addition to increased technology providing other outlets for bullies, Caruso said it also has decreased traditional communication between children, such as talking and problem-solving face to face.

“One of the issues with technology and social media and whatnot is the loss of communication,” Caruso said.

To deter negative online interactions, she urged advising your child to resist the temptation to respond to the bully, don’t retaliate, save any evidence and use online privacy tools to block the bully.

Newsroom Staff
Producer@kbjr.com

To submit a comment on this article, your email address is required. We respect your privacy and your email will not be visible to others nor will it be added to any email lists.

at 6:49 pm

IT Careers: Success vs. Bullying

“Every office full of ambitious people has them. And we have all worked with at least one—the co-worker with an inexplicable ability to rise in the ranks,” wrote the Wall Street Journal recently in an article entitled What Corporate Climbers Can Teach Us. “‘How do they do it?’ we may ask ourselves or whisper to friends at work,” it continued. “They don’t have more experience. They don’t seem that brilliant.”

The answer it suggests is the “dark triad” [pdf] of personality traits identified by psychologists as: narcissism, Machiavellianism and psychopathy. “These traits are well-known for the bad behaviour that they can cause when dominant in people’s personalities,” explained the article. “At milder levels, however, they can actually foster skills that can help people rise through the ranks.”

Of course, there’s a very fine line between demonstrating these skills for the purpose of career progression and becoming that covert workplace bully. And the latter is a serious problem. Recent research from the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI) released in Feb 2014 [PDF], shows 27% of all adult Americans have directly experienced “repeated abusive conduct that is threatening, intimidating, humiliating, work sabotage or work abuse.”

Dr. Namie, Director of WBI and widely regarded as North America’s foremost authority on workplace bullying, tells us that bullies also usually exhibit this dark triad. In fact, he demonstrates that the sort of qualities that facilitate career progression are indelibly linked to workplace bullying. “Look at that package,” Dr. Namie tells us: “these are the people who are willing to meddle with others. They fill their days with political gamesmanship. And the other people, the targets, come to work to do their job.”

“[For the bullies] climbing the ladder is all of their work,” Dr. Namie continues. “It is their focus. It becomes a zero-sum game where they must obliterate all competition. They see co-workers as competition as opposed to peers, or a possible pool of friends. They see them as someone to dupe, overcome and climb over. And it is just Machiavellian. And some people don’t have that view at all. They’re co-corporative. They’re nice. They’re kind. The targets are in that group.”

Our own new research into bullying in tech supports this slightly sinister, nefarious view of career climbers who clamber on up, at both the expense of the company and their victims. Findings reveal that from a self-selecting study of over 650 IT professionals, 75% reported they had been bullied. Of these 94% highlighted psychological bullying, and in 74% of cases, the perpetrator was senior. This perfectly fits the profile of individuals who strategically abuse others to maintain their own position. And this type of manipulative self-protectionism can really hinder the bottom line.

Suzi Benoit who has investigated numerous US organisations across the spectrum is keen to stress there are two types of bully. “One is a straightforward bully who vents their anger and feelings onto other people. But to me, a toxic employee is a bully who has a strategy for maintaining their own power.”

“More toxic bullies who are trying to prevent themselves from being held accountable and are attacking people who are trying to improve the workplace,” she continues. “That toxic bully, or more strategic bully, is harder to deal with. They are really good at manipulating other people.  They are very good at covering themselves.”

This viewpoint was strongly corroborated by numerous testimonials that came from the 400 in-depth accounts compiled for our study: “I showed up to do the best possible work and her [the bully’s] entire function was to advance herself,” wrote one. “I don’t care about upward mobility” wrote another, “only about delivering the best product I can – for that I was driven out.”

Of course, all this is certainly an extremely one sided, and certainly doesn’t paint any kind of comprehensive portrait of corporate life. However, it does all seem to highlight that whilst some personalities might be better at making their way up the corporate ladder, they are not necessarily the best individuals either for the workplace, or for the organisation as a whole.

In fact, as we all know, superficially pleasant people who harbour such nasty character traits can find it particularly easy to move through workplaces that promote competition and hierarchies. And this can rapidly become an unequal contest. If an individual speaks out about perceived abuse by someone in a senior position, at best they run the risk of looking silly, whiny and emotional. At worst, they run the risk of being fired. Either way it is likely to damage the subordinate’s career prospects, especially as all this is notoriously difficult to prove and there is no overt legislation.   

The most worrying part about our own survey results overall though, is that when we asked respondents who had been bullied to rate the scale of their abuse from one to ten, where one was mild, and ten was “virtually unbearable”, 76% rated it seven or more out of ten. Whilst 22% overall rated it as the full ten out of ten, “virtually unbearable.” Some people even told us they had contemplated suicide.

In truth, it is hard to pin down that fine line between rampant careerism and wantonly abusing others and the organisation for personal gain. However, all this does serve to raise awareness about some very real workplace issues. Maybe you were right to be suspicious of that unfathomably successful office fast-tracker?

Bullying: The Uncomfortable Truth about IT:

http://ieet.org/index.php/IEET/more/cave20140821

at 6:49 pm

Korn Stands up to Bullying in Blood-Soaked ‘Hater’ Video: Watch

By Jay Tilles

Warning: The above video may be considered NSFW or too graphic for some audiences.

In Korn‘s new video for “Hater”, the band seeks to project a positive message, one of empowerment and strength, to those who have been scarred by bullies.

Over the past two decades, Korn frontman Jonathan Davis has been vocal about having been bullied as a youth.

Lyrics aren’t the only way Davis shows his distaste for bullies. Several of the the singer’s prominent tattoos serve as symbols of his struggles against those that beat him down, mentally and physically. On Davis’ left shoulder is a large HIV.

Related: Korn’s Brian ‘Head’ Welch on Tim Lambesis: ‘Everyone Has a Certain Breaking Point’

“He got this tattoo as a way to get back at all of the teens in high school who used to bully him and make fun of him,” notes fan site Korn Row. “Now that he has grown and moved past all the taunting, he views the tattoo as a symbol of the fact that he has been strong enough to overcome that adversity and become a successful musician.”

Director David Yarovesky assembled shots of people covered in white paint being drenched in blood, scarring themselves, slitting wrists and worse, as their innocence is stripped and suicide becomes an avenue of relief. Interspersed with the bloody images are stories from real people about surviving bullies’ attacks.

“In the end, I guess I want to say thank you to the boys because you made me who I am today,” says one of the girls in the video. “I’m one badass chick. So, thank you for being a dick.”

The video accompanies the band’s latest single from The Paradigm Shift, Korn’s current album.

http://radio.com/2014/08/21/korn-bullying-hater-music-video/

at 6:49 pm

New Principal for Middle School

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

Matthew Pollack

Matthew Pollack

Matthew Pollack, the new principal at Mary Putnam Henck Intermediate School, brings many years of middle school teaching and administration experience to the position.



Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 12:00 am

New Principal for Middle School

By Mike Harris, Reporter

Mountain News

|
0 comments

Cyberbullying is one of the major issues facing parents and students today, and new Mary Putnam Henck Intermediate School Principal Matthew Pollack said it will be a primary focus for him and his administration.

“Over the years, I have seen some of the worst of bullying, and its (serious) impact on students,” Pollack said, speaking to this reporter during a lunch break at Tuesday’s district-wide teacher orientation meeting, held at Rim of the World High School.

Previously, bullying might be limited to school, but with the Internet and personal devices such as smart phones, cyberbullying can follow a student anywhere, even into the home. Cyberbullying is perhaps the worst form of bullying, he added, “because kids can’t get away from it.”

Pollack comes to MPH with many years of middle school experience, having served both as a teacher and administrator. He last served as principal at High Desert Premier Academy, an alternative education school within the Apple Valley Unified School District. It includes independent study for grades K-12 as well as adult education and a program for high school students who are experiencing failure and frustration in their home schools.

Pollack also led the High Desert Academy to its first accreditation from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Prior to that, Pollack led Gifford C. Cole Middle School in Lancaster to new levels of student achievement.

He grew up in Apple Valley, and attended California State University, San Bernardino where he earned a bachelor’s degree in communication. Middle schools are a passion for him, because they are a critical juncture for young people’s development.

“It’s at that point where the (child) begins saying go away, I can do this, but they still need guidance,” he said.

His focus as MPH principal will be to stress parent involvement, and he said he would continue the successful Community Nights programs.

He also said he would focus on using the Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) program that teaches positive social behaviors. He’s a strong supporter of the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program as well as a supporter of Regional Occupation Program (ROP) career choices.

Pollack is married to Susan Pollack, who teaches at Apple Valley High School. They have two sons, Samuel, age 8, and Benjamin, age 6. He plans to commute from his home in Apple Valley for the present.

on

Thursday, August 21, 2014 12:00 am.

http://www.mountain-news.com/news/article_ceee6aae-2947-11e4-abf0-001a4bcf887a.html

at 12:50 pm

Learning to combat bullying, on playground and online

Lt. Tom Siefert of the Huntersville Police Department introduced the panel.

Lt. Tom Siefert of the Huntersville Police Department introduced the panel (Jonathan Cox/DavidsonNews.net)

By JONATHAN COX
DavidsonNews.net

HUNTERSVILLE – With Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) classes beginning on Monday, bullying is back on the radar. A panel of experts came to the Huntersville Police Department Tuesday to discuss steps that parents, school administrators, and residents can take to combat the problem.

The forum was hosted by the Foundation for Respect Ability, a Cornelius-based non-profit that works to prevent bullying in area schools. The panel included representatives from local schools, law enforcement, and other anti-bullying groups.

CYBER-BULLYING

Lynn Hennighausen, the president of nonprofit Davidson LifeLine, explained the threat posed by bullying.

“Bullying can create feelings of hopelessness and isolation, and that can be a risk factor for suicide,” she said. Family, school, and community must to work together to address the issue, she said.

With children exposed from a young age to social media – and all its perils – cyber-bullying was one of the main concerns raised at the forum. North Carolina law defines cyber-bullying as “use of a computer or computer network with the intent to intimidate or torment a minor,” and ranks it as a low-class misdemeanor. The incidence of this type of bullying has increased as the use of social media has grown.

The Huntersville Police Department meeting room was full of parents and students concerned about bullying (Jonathan Cox/DavidsonNews.net)

The Huntersville Police Department meeting room was full of parents and students concerned about bullying (Jonathan Cox/DavidsonNews.net)

Cyberbullying comes in many forms. One variety is “swatting” – where an anonymous person tips off the police to a fake bomb threat with the intent of getting a SWAT team to investigate the target’s house. Another common variety is a “burn page,” a site that singles out a victim for mockery.

Some parents, bewildered by the large number of social media apps, explained that they felt unsure how to police their children’s interactions online. Several asked for advice on how to ensure that their children are not exposing themselves to the threat of cyber-bullying.

Officer Philip Geiger of the Davidson Police Department  sympathized with parents trying to keep up with their children’s lives online. “Keeping up with social media is like drinking out of a firehose,” he said.

Despite the steep learning curve, he said, it is important for parents to stay up-to-date with social apps and media: “Parents really have to do their due diligence about what is appropriate at different age levels.”

Panelists said parents should place their children’s safety over their privacy. Kenny Lynch, of the FBI Cyber Crimes Task Force, said, “If you go create an environment where your kids know that you could look into their phone at any time, they’ll be less likely to do something they shouldn’t.”

Hennighausen said that Davidson LifeLine is working on a “parent toolkit” to help parents stay abreast of changes in social media. The parent toolkit will be a resource that keeps track of the four most popular social media sites at a given time, their potential dangers, and how to change their settings.

Tim Hager, a School Resource officer from Alexander Middle School

Tim Hager, a School Resource officer from Alexander Middle School

BUDGET CUTS HURT SOCIAL TRAINING

Social and emotional behavior training – training that focuses on helping students develop a sense of responsibility and empathy – has been under-emphasized, said the panel. Schools are focusing on end-of-grade scores rather than the emotional intelligence of students.

Budget cuts at the state level have reduced the schools’ funding for social workers, and many schools lack the staff to educate or help students with bullying issues. Counselors are often overbooked with helping seniors with college applications, assisting students in choosing classes, and other duties.

“Who do the students talk to?” asked Linda Petry, PTA president at Hough High School. “There’s really no one to turn to. The counselors are busy with other things.”

Without as many social workers at school, school resource officers have sometimes had to fill the role of counselor: “I do more than just policing,” said Officer Tim Hager, School Resource Officer at Alexander Mddle School. “I’m a father to some of them, an uncle, a brother.”

John Concelman, CMS Character Development Initiatives Specialist, said that schools can address the lack of staff by using PTA fundraisers to fund programs that develop social and emotional learning.

“Sure, it’s great to ask about academics, but social-emotional learning matters too.”

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

http://davidsonnews.net/blog/2014/08/20/learning-to-combat-bullying-on-playground-and-online/

at 12:50 pm

Learning to combat bullying, on playground and online

Lt. Tom Siefert of the Huntersville Police Department introduced the panel.

Lt. Tom Siefert of the Huntersville Police Department introduced the panel (Jonathan Cox/DavidsonNews.net)

By JONATHAN COX
DavidsonNews.net

HUNTERSVILLE – With Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) classes beginning on Monday, bullying is back on the radar. A panel of experts came to the Huntersville Police Department Tuesday to discuss steps that parents, school administrators, and residents can take to combat the problem.

The forum was hosted by the Foundation for Respect Ability, a Cornelius-based non-profit that works to prevent bullying in area schools. The panel included representatives from local schools, law enforcement, and other anti-bullying groups.

CYBER-BULLYING

Lynn Hennighausen, the president of nonprofit Davidson LifeLine, explained the threat posed by bullying.

“Bullying can create feelings of hopelessness and isolation, and that can be a risk factor for suicide,” she said. Family, school, and community must to work together to address the issue, she said.

With children exposed from a young age to social media – and all its perils – cyber-bullying was one of the main concerns raised at the forum. North Carolina law defines cyber-bullying as “use of a computer or computer network with the intent to intimidate or torment a minor,” and ranks it as a low-class misdemeanor. The incidence of this type of bullying has increased as the use of social media has grown.

The Huntersville Police Department meeting room was full of parents and students concerned about bullying (Jonathan Cox/DavidsonNews.net)

The Huntersville Police Department meeting room was full of parents and students concerned about bullying (Jonathan Cox/DavidsonNews.net)

Cyberbullying comes in many forms. One variety is “swatting” – where an anonymous person tips off the police to a fake bomb threat with the intent of getting a SWAT team to investigate the target’s house. Another common variety is a “burn page,” a site that singles out a victim for mockery.

Some parents, bewildered by the large number of social media apps, explained that they felt unsure how to police their children’s interactions online. Several asked for advice on how to ensure that their children are not exposing themselves to the threat of cyber-bullying.

Officer Philip Geiger of the Davidson Police Department  sympathized with parents trying to keep up with their children’s lives online. “Keeping up with social media is like drinking out of a firehose,” he said.

Despite the steep learning curve, he said, it is important for parents to stay up-to-date with social apps and media: “Parents really have to do their due diligence about what is appropriate at different age levels.”

Panelists said parents should place their children’s safety over their privacy. Kenny Lynch, of the FBI Cyber Crimes Task Force, said, “If you go create an environment where your kids know that you could look into their phone at any time, they’ll be less likely to do something they shouldn’t.”

Hennighausen said that Davidson LifeLine is working on a “parent toolkit” to help parents stay abreast of changes in social media. The parent toolkit will be a resource that keeps track of the four most popular social media sites at a given time, their potential dangers, and how to change their settings.

Tim Hager, a School Resource officer from Alexander Middle School

Tim Hager, a School Resource officer from Alexander Middle School

BUDGET CUTS HURT SOCIAL TRAINING

Social and emotional behavior training – training that focuses on helping students develop a sense of responsibility and empathy – has been under-emphasized, said the panel. Schools are focusing on end-of-grade scores rather than the emotional intelligence of students.

Budget cuts at the state level have reduced the schools’ funding for social workers, and many schools lack the staff to educate or help students with bullying issues. Counselors are often overbooked with helping seniors with college applications, assisting students in choosing classes, and other duties.

“Who do the students talk to?” asked Linda Petry, PTA president at Hough High School. “There’s really no one to turn to. The counselors are busy with other things.”

Without as many social workers at school, school resource officers have sometimes had to fill the role of counselor: “I do more than just policing,” said Officer Tim Hager, School Resource Officer at Alexander Mddle School. “I’m a father to some of them, an uncle, a brother.”

John Concelman, CMS Character Development Initiatives Specialist, said that schools can address the lack of staff by using PTA fundraisers to fund programs that develop social and emotional learning.

“Sure, it’s great to ask about academics, but social-emotional learning matters too.”

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

http://davidsonnews.net/blog/2014/08/20/learning-to-combat-bullying-on-playground-and-online/

at 12:49 pm

OUR OPINION: Bullying measure shouldn’t be taken lightly

Stop Bullying Emily Wallace

Stop Bullying Emily Wallace

The sheets of paper these students are holding represent their number after registering at standtogether.com to stand up to bullying. (SBT File Photo)



Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 5:47 am

OUR OPINION: Bullying measure shouldn’t be taken lightly

It’s clear that bullying in schools so concerned the Indiana General Assembly that lawmakers passed a measure requiring schools statewide to track cases.

Those statistics then would determine what resources would be provided to schools to address the issue.

Subscription Required


An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.


You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?


Login Now

Need an online subscription?


Subscribe

Login

Or, use your
facebook account:

Choose an online service.

    Current print subscribers


    Login Now

    Need an online subscription?


    Subscribe

    Login

    Or, use your
    facebook account:

    Choose an online service.

      Current print subscribers

      on

      Thursday, August 21, 2014 5:47 am.

      http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/opinion/our_opinion/our-opinion-bullying-measure-shouldn-t-be-taken-lightly/article_3c5c1f80-2918-11e4-99e6-0017a43b2370.html

      at 12:49 pm

      OUR OPINION: Bullying measure shouldn’t be taken lightly

      Stop Bullying Emily Wallace

      Stop Bullying Emily Wallace

      The sheets of paper these students are holding represent their number after registering at standtogether.com to stand up to bullying. (SBT File Photo)



      Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 5:47 am

      OUR OPINION: Bullying measure shouldn’t be taken lightly

      It’s clear that bullying in schools so concerned the Indiana General Assembly that lawmakers passed a measure requiring schools statewide to track cases.

      Those statistics then would determine what resources would be provided to schools to address the issue.

      Subscription Required


      An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.


      You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

      Have an online subscription?


      Login Now

      Need an online subscription?


      Subscribe

      Login

      Or, use your
      facebook account:

      Choose an online service.

        Current print subscribers


        Login Now

        Need an online subscription?


        Subscribe

        Login

        Or, use your
        facebook account:

        Choose an online service.

          Current print subscribers

          on

          Thursday, August 21, 2014 5:47 am.

          http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/opinion/our_opinion/our-opinion-bullying-measure-shouldn-t-be-taken-lightly/article_3c5c1f80-2918-11e4-99e6-0017a43b2370.html

          at 12:48 pm

          Weitzel: Bullying and cyber bullying

          As the school year begins, it is time to take a hard look at bullying and cyber bullying in our schools and community.

          The Riverside Police Department has seen an increase in reported bullying and cyber bullying cases. Let’s start by defining the two. Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-age children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is usually repeated, or has potential to be repeated, over time. Cyber bullying is bullying through technology, such as computers and cell phones. Law enforcement officers are increasingly confronted with cyber bullying complaints due to the prevalence of technology used by children and youth, and new legislation and laws addressing these types of incidents.

          During the last month, the Riverside Police Department has trained all their police personnel on preparing and responding to bullying and cyber bullying investigations. In partnership with the International Association of Chiefs of Police, officers have been trained to respond to complaints and how to address those concerns. The training included knowing the latest laws under Illinois statutes, how to preserve and manage digital evidence, proper referrals for offenders to either counseling or the criminal justice system, and have a written police policy on protocols and training for bullying and cyber bullying incidents.

          Each Riverside officer has been issued a tip card that includes over 20recommendations to address bullying and cyber bullying. These tip cards include such training and response areas as youth trauma, mental health issues, computer crimes, victim services and education. The cards provide guidance for preparation, response and investigation by Riverside police officers.

          The real prevention for bullying and cyber bullying starts with our educators in the schools. I am happy to say I have discussed this with our school leaders in Riverside and they have written protocols and policies and are ready to handle these situations.

          Members of the Riverside Police Department are giving bullying a second look, recognizing its detrimental impact on the lives of bullies and their victims. Multiple studies have emphasized the link between bullying and antisocial and/or criminal behavior. Overall, bullying complaints received by the Riverside Police Department have been low, but are on the increase.

          Let’s have a safe and productive school year!

          Thomas Weitzel is chief of police in the village of Riverside

          http://www.mysuburbanlife.com/2014/08/14/weitzel-bullying-and-cyber-bullying/acp0lpz/

          at 12:48 pm

          Weitzel: Bullying and cyber bullying

          As the school year begins, it is time to take a hard look at bullying and cyber bullying in our schools and community.

          The Riverside Police Department has seen an increase in reported bullying and cyber bullying cases. Let’s start by defining the two. Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-age children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is usually repeated, or has potential to be repeated, over time. Cyber bullying is bullying through technology, such as computers and cell phones. Law enforcement officers are increasingly confronted with cyber bullying complaints due to the prevalence of technology used by children and youth, and new legislation and laws addressing these types of incidents.

          During the last month, the Riverside Police Department has trained all their police personnel on preparing and responding to bullying and cyber bullying investigations. In partnership with the International Association of Chiefs of Police, officers have been trained to respond to complaints and how to address those concerns. The training included knowing the latest laws under Illinois statutes, how to preserve and manage digital evidence, proper referrals for offenders to either counseling or the criminal justice system, and have a written police policy on protocols and training for bullying and cyber bullying incidents.

          Each Riverside officer has been issued a tip card that includes over 20recommendations to address bullying and cyber bullying. These tip cards include such training and response areas as youth trauma, mental health issues, computer crimes, victim services and education. The cards provide guidance for preparation, response and investigation by Riverside police officers.

          The real prevention for bullying and cyber bullying starts with our educators in the schools. I am happy to say I have discussed this with our school leaders in Riverside and they have written protocols and policies and are ready to handle these situations.

          Members of the Riverside Police Department are giving bullying a second look, recognizing its detrimental impact on the lives of bullies and their victims. Multiple studies have emphasized the link between bullying and antisocial and/or criminal behavior. Overall, bullying complaints received by the Riverside Police Department have been low, but are on the increase.

          Let’s have a safe and productive school year!

          Thomas Weitzel is chief of police in the village of Riverside

          http://www.mysuburbanlife.com/2014/08/14/weitzel-bullying-and-cyber-bullying/acp0lpz/

          at 6:48 am

          Council bullying of Martinez costs city $400000

          A day after the City of Salinas agreed to pay her $400,000 for being subjected to a harsh bullying session by three members of the City Council, former Library and Community Services Director Elizabeth Martinez expressed both sadness and relief.

          The settlement followed a closed-door mediation session earlier this month regarding a heated Feb. 25 meeting between Martinez, her boss Ray Corpuz Jr. and three members of the City Council – Tony Barrera, Kimbley Craig and Steve McShane.

          “I am glad it’s over. But they abused their power. What I went through in there was shocking and humiliating. I didn’t want this to go to court, but maybe the settlement money will send a statement. Maybe it will make these council members think twice before they decide to abuse another employee,” Martinez said in an exclusive interview Thursday with TheCalifornian.com/Under the Dome.

          The settlement was announced late Tuesday night following what several witnesses said was a fiery closed session meeting that saw Jose Castañeda refuse to vote, leaving Mayor Joe Gunter and council members Jyl Lutes and Gloria De La Rosa to vote on the settlement.

          Barrera, Craig and McShane – all of whom are up for reelection this fall – were barred from participating in the vote.

          The incident was first reported by TheCalifornian.com/Under the Dome in March.

          As part of the settlement, Martinez agreed to resign immediately from ther job she has held since Aug. 31, 2007.

          Because she said a confidentiality agreement is part of the settlement, Martinez said she is precluded from talking about the Aug. 7 mediation session she went through with her attorney, Michael Stamp, and City Attorney Chris Callihan.

          However, Martinez did recount the actions and statements of Barrera, Craig and McShane from the February meeting.

          Martinez said that she was asked to the meeting by Corpuz to talk about local fundraising efforts to reimburse the city for its restoration of sculptor Claes Oldenburg’s “Hat is Three Stages of Landing” at Sherwood Park.

          “However when you got into the meeting room, the mood turned immediately tense,” she said.

          Martinez gave the following account:

          A red-faced Barrera stood up at one point and said he didn’t care if Martinez raised “billions and billions” for the city. He also repeatedly turned to Corpuz and asked the question how long she would stay employed with the city.

          “I want her gone. I want her to leave now,” Martinez recalled of Barrera’s outburst.

          Craig then said that she “had trust issues” with Martinez.

          “I trust my police and I trust my firefighters but I don’t trust you,” Craig said, adding that she would refuse to support efforts to rehabilitate the city’s El Gabilan Library branch as long Martinez was behind them.

          McShane entered the meeting while in progress and offered this: “I’m just here to support them,” he said, referring to Craig and Barrera.

          Neither any of the council members involved nor Corpuz have commented on – or denied on the record – what Martinez and Stamp allege to have occurred during the meeting.

          However, City Hall sources say that City Attorney Callihan sent an email to the entire City Council a few days after the meeting asking them to have no further contact with Martinez and that issues with employees must be dealt with by their boss, Corpuz.

          Martinez also noted that in the days following the incident, Corpuz, Callihan and Gunter all visited her office separately to offer their personal apologies.

          TheCalifornian.com/Under the Dome asked Barrera, Craig and McShane for comment on the settlement agreement and, to a person, each largely declined to say much about it:

          Barrera: “Soap Opera Willie (Jeff Mitchell). The press release speaks for it self (sic). I wish Ms. Martinez the best, I am sure you will spin it as you see it with half-truths. You are not an honest man.”

          Later Wednedsay, at about 1:45 p.m., Barrera followed up with this message when I asked him how his involvement in the Martinez debacle would impact his chances at reelection:

          “Jeff,

          It all depends how you spin it, but remember the seat belongs to the voters. They will decide.

          Tony Barrera”

          Craig: “I have to respect the confidentiality of the matter.”

          McShane: “Finances have never been tighter for the City of Salinas. I wish Elizabeth well on her retirement the entire Council and City Administration will move beyond this.”

          Neither Corpuz nor Callihan could be reached for comment Wednesday.

          Meanwhile, Assistant City Manager Jim Pia will become acting director of library and community services for the city with Martinez’s departure.

          For her part, the incident caps a bumpy ride for Martinez, an award-winning librarian with national stature. She said that she anticipates returning to her home state, New Mexico, in about a month’s time.

          “I am very proud that I was able to direct the rehabilitation and rebirth of the Cesar Chavez Library in East Salinas. I am just sorry that because of this situation I won’t be able to continue my work here,” Martinez said. “Because of this, I haven’t even been able to say a proper goodbye to the many great people I was able to work with in Salinas. I will miss them and I wish them all well.”

          Jeff Mitchell covers Salinas Valley politics and government. Under the Dome, a reported opinion column, appears Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday in print and online. Email him at jemitchell@thecalifornian.com. For quick political hits, check out Under the Dome – The Blog, available most every day at: www.theCalifornian.com

          http://www.thecalifornian.com/story/news/2014/08/20/council-bullying-martinez-costs-city/14370661/

          at 6:48 am

          Racist Bullying Needs to Stop: We Cannot Become Desensitized to 10-Year …

          Racist bullying is a growing problem that cannot be ignored. I grew up in London, and I’d estimate that 99 percent of the British Chinese people I have met experienced some form of racist bullying. When I recently shared with an Asian friend my experience with bullying in school, his reply was, “Weren’t we all?”

          While researching my novel The Life of a Banana, I heard shocking stories from ethnic minorities about being physically bullied in school. I listened to accounts of being thrown in ditches, kicked in the face and spat upon. One Asian doctor told me that he was beaten up almost every single week in secondary school. There are also stories of successful black, Asian and mixed-raced adults who faced psychological bullying as a child. They were isolated, singled out as different, ignored, treated as second-class and told to “go back home!

          In 2013 a study published in JAMA Psychiatry looked at the long-term psychological effects of bullying. The researchers studied data from over 1,400 North Carolina kids aged 9, 11, and 13 and followed up with many of them into adulthood. They found that kids who had been victims of bullying had a greater risk for a number of disorders as adults, including anxiety, panic and agoraphobia.

          The scars of racial bullying sometimes take years to erase. Sadly, for some people, the scars never heal. Feelings of inadequacy and confusion that come with racist bullying often linger into adulthood. I know people who were racially bullied and still suffer from deep insecurities. They find it difficult to look people in the eye or lack the confidence of their work colleagues. I met a Chinese lady who is a very successful banker in a global firm. She shared that she finds it terrifying to speak to older, white, female bosses because she was bullied for many years in an all-girls’ school.

          A teacher also talked about her Muslim colleague who was bullied mercilessly as a child. Recently, when this colleague saw her bully by chance at a teaching conference, she ended up hiding in the restroom with a panic attack. Just the sight of the bully brought this grown woman back to her school days.

          For many survivors of playground taunts and punches, speaking in public is a big no-no. There is deep-rooted fear of becoming the butt of jokes — just like in school.

          I’ve encountered victims of racial abuse as children who suffer from depression and anger problems today. They put up guards and are extra-sensitive to people they feel are out to “get them.” Comments are often taken the wrong way, and bitterness from the past causes them to lash out. They defend themselves so regularly that it becomes routine, and they no longer know how to open up to anyone.

          In recent years there has been a worrying trend for 9- to 12-year-olds to hang themselves as a result of being bullied. I cried when reading about Sidney Boyimbo Nzamale, a little 11-year-old Congelese boy who hanged himself after being bullied at school. My heart aches each time I read about children who take their lives because of bullying. Imagine a child playing with a Barbie doll and then taking a scarf not to wrap her doll in but to hang herself with. For a child to reach that point of hopelessness is just the lowest kind of wrong in any society.

          More needs to be done!

          From a young age, children need to be educated to treat their classmates equally regardless of their race, sex, economic background and sexual orientation. There needs to be a zero-tolerance policy for bullying in schools. Bullying workshops once in a blue moon or an anti-bullying campaign once a year don’t work. Classroom exercises, talks and workshops should be introduced as part of the syllabus. Anti bullying should be an ingrained part of the cultural makeup of any school. It needs to start young — as young as possible.

          Instead of channeling funds into end-of-year plays and musical recitals to please the parents, more schools could get involved in something like The Bully Project.

          Kids are expelled for drugs or carrying knives. They are given detention when they swear or wear the wrong shoes. So why is racist bullying not taken as seriously? Why do many teachers close their eyes to name calling and “small” scuffles?

          A South American lady shared with me how other children marginalized her 5-year-old daughter because she was too “huggy” for British culture. The class bully threw a sharp pen at the little girl’s eye and missed it by centimeters. When the mother complained, her concerns were swept under the carpet. I saw firsthand how, within two years, this little girl changed from a vivacious and smiley child into a sullen and moody girl whom the doctor put forward for counseling.

          Children need to know that racial bullying or any kind of bullying is not an acceptable part of society. A societal change needs to happen if true reform is to take root. Something needs to be done soon; if not, the stories about bullied children committing suicide will keep growing.

          We cannot and must not become a society that becomes desensitized to 10-year-olds hanging themselves.

          Will it take a 3-year-old jumping in front of a train to make people sit up and take notice?

          Racist bullying and all kinds of bullying needs to stop!

          Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pp-wong-/racist-bullying-needs-to-_b_5693803.html

          at 6:48 am

          New App Truth Allows iOS Users to Send Anonymous Texts, But No Cyberbullying Allowed.

          Posted by in Cyber Bullying

          Cyberbullying is a serious problem and the impact of it is usually catastrophic.

          It’s a known fact that anonymous social chat apps are one of the reasons behind cyberbullying. If you’ve been following us on Vulcan Post, you would remember that we previously reported that 1 in 3 students in Singapore have been victims of the heinous crime. It’s awful and despite the repeated messages by organisations, it is still happening around the world. Even more recently, the late Robin Williams’ daughter even decided to quit Twitter due to harassment from cyberbullies.

          Foro Technologies has developed a new anonymous app called Truth for iOS users, and truth be told, it’s making me like a cat on a hot tin roof.

          Also read: Facebook Dropping Main Feature and Urges Users To Download Messenger 

          iOS

          Image Credit: Truth

          “Truth is a new messaging app that allows you to message your friends truthfully. Join thousands of people who are telling truths – with Truth!” 

          – Truth

          The iOS app works pretty much the same way as its counterpart, Android app Secret: it allows users to anonymously message people in their phone contacts. After sending the message, the user’s identity is disguised as an owl with a random personality. If the receivers don’t have the app, Truth will send them a text with a portion of the sender’s message to tempt them to download the app to continue the conversation.

          iOS

          Image Credit: Truth on iTunes

          What happens if users received some messages they didn’t like? Report it. Foro Technologies aims to create a non-threatening environment and they have zero tolerance when it comes to cyberbullying.

          Frankly speaking, with the existence of similar apps like Yik Yak, Whisper, and Secret, I’m really not that interested in another anonymous social chat app. However, I do have to applaud Truth for its charming layout. Plus, the fact that the developers are ready to take any measures against cyberbullying gives them a couple of brownie points.

          iOS

          Image Credit: Truth

          Judging by the design, it looks like Truth is targeted at youngsters. Since youths are typically big on social media apps, this iOS app is quite possibly going to do well in the market.

          Verdict: Truth is well-intentioned, for sure. Will it backfire? I can’t help to think that there are people out there who are going to manipulate the system to cut someone to the quick. Hopefully the developers will do what it takes to ensure that the safety of its users are maintained.

          Also read: Newly Revamped Couple App LoveByte Lets You Check Your Partner’s Phone Battery!

           

          The post New App Truth Allows iOS Users to Send Anonymous Texts, But No Cyberbullying Allowed. appeared first on Vulcan Post.

          Also Read

          http://sg.news.yahoo.com/app-truth-allows-ios-users-050053096.html

          at 6:48 am

          Rocklin High Student brings Gun to School, Arrested Same Day

          Posted by in School

          police lights

          ROCKLIN— On the second day of the school year, a Rocklin High student brought a gun to school. He was arrested by police and nobody was harmed.

          David Bills, the principal of Rocklin High School, released a statement to the press regarding the situation and how it was handled.

          According to the release, a 14-year-old student showed another person a hand gun around 15 minutes after the school day ended on Wednesday. The school immediately contacted the Rocklin Police Department.

          Police investigated, and confirmed that a boy did indeed have a hand gun on campus that day.

          The student was arrested soon after police confirmed his actions.

          According to a Rocklin High parent, the school sent out an automated recording Wednesday night from the school explaining what happened just before the school announced it publicly.

          http://fox40.com/2014/08/20/rocklin-high-student-brings-gun-to-school-arrested-same-day/

          at 6:48 am

          Student suspended for saying “bless you” at school

          Posted by in School

          DYER COUNTY, Tenn. — A young girl, who claims she was standing up for her religious beliefs in the classroom, was suspended after breaking a class rule of saying “bless you” after a classmate sneezed.

          When Dyer County High School senior Kendra Turner said bless you to her classmate, she says her teacher told her that was for church.

          “She said that we’re not going to have godly speaking in her class and that’s when I said we have a constitutional right,” said Turner.

          Turner said when she defended her actions, she was told to see an administrator. She said she finished the class period in in-school suspension.

          Students sent WMC a photo of the teacher’s white board that lists ‘bless you’ and other expressions that are banned as part of class rules.

          It sparked discussion with Turner’s youth pastor Becky Winegardner last week at church.

          “There were several students who were talking about this particular faculty member there that was very demeaning to them in regard to their faith,” Winegardner said.

          Turner’s parents said the school leaders claim the outburst was a classroom distraction and that she shouted “bless you” across the room.

          “This was something that had come up previously in the last few weeks just since the beginning of school and I shared with all of those students what their rights were,” added Winegardner.

          Turner’s family met with school leaders Tuesday. They said the teacher claimed Turner was being disruptive and aggressive. Some classmates showed support Tuesday by wearing hand made bless you shirts.

          Turner said she doesn’t want trouble for her teacher but said she’ll stand up for her faith.

          “It’s alright to defend God and it’s our constitutional right because we have a freedom of religion and freedom of speech,” said Turner.

          Source: WMC/CNN

          http://fox2now.com/2014/08/20/student-suspended-for-saying-bless-you-at-school/

          at 6:48 am

          Back-to-school: School lunches are packing a healthier punch

          Posted by in School

          It’s a tired old cliche: From lunch ladies with blue tresses and hairnets to references to “mystery meat” or a squirt of ketchup counting as a vegetable serving, we’ve all heard the jokes a thousand times. You know, the ones with a punch line about bad food in the school cafeteria.

          Those stereotypes rub school cafeteria workers the wrong way. And they don’t reflect the reality of today’s nutrition-savvy, locally sourced cafeteria food.

          In Prince William County this year, for example, one of the menu items is a “super food” salad with fresh blueberries, chopped kale and red cabbage. Montgomery County is establishing a 7,200-square-foot garden to grow its own produce. And in Alexandria, schools have begun serving sliced fruit instead of whole pieces to better appeal to their youngest customers and cut back on plate waste.

          Take that, jokesters. Whatever your memories of school lunches decades ago may be, they’re not germane today, school nutrition directors say.

          “It’s just one of those things that’s easy to target,” said Becky Domokos-Bays, director of school nutrition services for Alexandria City public schools. “No matter who you are, you can always complain about the food. Everybody’s an expert, because we all eat.”


          (Melinda Beck for The Washington Post)

          Tater tots and French fries are being replaced by fresh produce from school gardens. Chicken patties are baked, not fried, and have whole-grain breading. In some places, schools are returning to a cooking-from-scratch approach instead of warming up processed foods.

          “Schools have really come a long way in terms of getting more locally grown produce on the menu, catering to allergies and intolerances, trying to diversify their menus to appeal to an increasingly diverse student body, and trying to get creative in making these healthier choices appealing, as well,” said Diane Pratt-Heavner, a spokeswoman for the School Nutrition Association, a national group that represents the people who work in the school food industry.

          More than 30 million children at more than 95,000 schools in the United States buy school lunch each day, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department. That’s more than 5 billion lunches a year — all of which must include low-fat milk, whole grains, protein, fruits and vegetables — since new regulations went into effect in 2012. They have to do it for about $3 per meal and move hundreds of hungry kids through their lines in a couple of hours each day.

          If you think that’s easy, think again.

          “I thought very smugly, ‘School food, how hard can it be?’ ” said Tony Geraci, executive director for child nutrition for Shelby County schools in Tennessee. Geraci, the focus of a new PBS documentary called “Cafeteria Man,” had worked as a chef but switched to the school food industry after breaking his back. As a single father, he liked the idea of having the same schedule as his three kids. He quickly found out he was wrong about school food.

          “It’s the hardest industry I’ve ever worked in in my entire life,” he said. “It’s the most regulated industry, and there’s more pushback around food than you can imagine.”

          Parents struggle to plan a nutritious dinner on which two or three kids can agree. So planning one for 700 kids seems like a logistical nightmare — particularly when you are required to follow strict guidelines. In addition to the 2012 standards that called for fruits and vegetables with every meal and set calorie minimums and maximums, new standards rolled out this summer further reduce the sodium in school lunches and require that all of the grains on the menu, including breading on meat products, be rich in whole grains.

          “It’s very hard; there are all kinds of demands on us,” said Serena Suthers, director of nutrition services for Prince William County schools. “But that’s okay, because we want to meet them. If you come and have a meal, and judge it, if I asked ‘What do you think of that meal for $3.35 [the cost a parent or faculty member pays for lunch in the county]?’ I think you’d come away saying, ‘I’m impressed.’ ”

          School nutrition experts are bridging the gap between the foods many kids seem to gravitate toward — pizza, hot dogs, macaroni and cheese — and what they should eat by offering more nutritious versions of those preferred foods, with a heaping side of fresh fruits and vegetables.

          “Our goal is to provide healthy food that is [affordable] to families, but it has to be food items that kids will eat,” said Marla Caplon, director of school food services for Montgomery public schools. “So we take a slice of pizza, but it’s made with whole-grain crust, low-sodium tomato sauce and low-fat cheese. It’s healthier than what they would get at a restaurant, but kids will eat it.”

          For Geraci in Tennessee, that means taking traditional Southern vegetables that kids know, such as okra and greens, and cooking them differently so that they are flavorful but also more nutritious. You aren’t going to get rid of pizza, hot dogs and hamburgers, he said. But he’s serving flatbread pizzas that the students have designed. The hamburgers are covered with a chili sauce made with legumes. The hot dogs come with red beans and rice.

          Overcoming those kinds of challenges and filling kids’ bellies with nutritious options is why the people who run school cafeterias happily show up at work before daybreak to start their jobs.

          Christina Herndandez, the cafeteria manager at Forest Oak Middle School in Montgomery, arrives at 5:30 a.m. to start preparing the day’s offerings for about 600 customers. She’s constantly gauging their choices so she can adjust supply to meet demand that day. So, if they are down to 10 cheeseburgers after the first lunch period, she knows she needs to make a larger batch for the next group of students.

          Hwasun Bailey, the cafeteria manager at Yorkshire Elementary School in Manassas, dishes out nearly 600 breakfasts and 780 lunches every day. Workers serve the breakfast in about 15 minutes as the students head to class, then lunch from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. It takes two lines to move the kids through quickly, and she is constantly monitoring them for backups. If the line gets too long, she pulls staff members from the cooking area to the front to get things moving.

          The students at Yorkshire love the popcorn chicken and the orange slices and grapes but aren’t too keen on the refried beans, Bailey said. She said she puts up posters in the cafeteria to reinforce the importance of eating fresh fruits and vegetables every day. A lot of it, she said, is exposure, or seeing their friends try something. One mother sought her out at an open house, she said, to express gratitude that her vegetable-averse son had started eating broccoli after trying it at school.

          Hernandez said she tastes every new product herself before offering it to “my kids.” And she lives for the smiles on those preteen faces.

          “I wouldn’t change my job for anything,” Hernandez said. “It’s middle school, so they’re just starting to go through that difficult phase, but the kids are good, respectful kids. I just keep smiling at them, and eventually they’re going to turn around and smile back at you.”

          More from The Washington Post:

          Tips before the school year starts

          Back to school, with a food reboot

          More back to school coverage

          More On Parenting coverage

          Five ways to help your middle-school student get organized

          Let your middle schooler be risky

          http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/school-lunches-are-packing-a-healthier-punch/2014/08/19/54126ad6-1cec-11e4-ab7b-696c295ddfd1_story.html

          at 12:47 am

          Letter: End bullying in schools

          0) { %

          0) { %

          0) { %

          http://www.thestarpress.com/story/opinion/readers/2014/08/20/letter-end-bullying-schools/14356699/

          at 12:47 am

          Letter: End bullying in schools

          0) { %

          0) { %

          0) { %

          http://www.thestarpress.com/story/opinion/readers/2014/08/20/letter-end-bullying-schools/14356699/

          at 12:47 am

          "Wiles Hero’s" Anti-Bullying Program

          © 2000 – 2012 Diversified Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms Conditions

          http://www.wcjb.com/local-news/2014/08/wiles-heros-anti-bullying-program

          at 12:47 am

          "Wiles Hero’s" Anti-Bullying Program

          © 2000 – 2012 Diversified Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms Conditions

          http://www.wcjb.com/local-news/2014/08/wiles-heros-anti-bullying-program