March 3, 2015 at 9:02 pm

Curt Schilling, Ex-Red Sox Pitcher, Knocks Down Internet Trolls Who Bullied …

PHOTO: Former Philadelphia Phillies player Curt Schilling participates in Alumni Weekend ceremonies before a game against the Atlanta Braves at Citizens Bank Park on Aug. 3, 2013 in Philadelphia, Pa.

World Series MVP and former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling took matters into his own hands when Twitter users started to cyberbully his teenage daughter.

The All-Star struck back at two Internet trolls in particular who made vulgar remarks, with Schilling revealing their identities and schools on his blog.

The crude comments were in response to Schilling’s congratulatory tweet to his daughter’s acceptance to college in Rhode Island.

Despite spending years around jock talk in locker rooms, Schilling, who last played in 2007, said the tweets, which alluded to lewd acts and rape, crossed the line.

“Anybody that reads it and says it’s just a joke, I know a couple things for a fact, they’re not fathers of kids,” Schilling told “Good Morning America.”

PHOTO: Curt Schilling, coach of the Drifters, a 16-and-under girls softball team, catches his daughter Gabby at Shonda Schilling Field in Medfield, Ma. on July 19, 2013.

Schilling, 48, posted images of some of the vulgar Tweets on his blog Sunday, writing, “is this even remotely ok? In ANY world? At ANY time?”

“I grew up in a locker room. I grew up playing sports. I know what it means to be a guy. Never in my life, have I ever uttered half of the words that these guys were posting,” Schilling said.

True to what Schilling wrote in his blog, where he wrote, “The real world has consequences when you do and say things about others,” there were consequences for the trolls.

The school of one of the Twitter users, Brookdale Community College in New Jersey, said it suspended the student.

“The student has been summarily suspended and will be scheduled for a conduct hearing where further disciplinary action will be taken,” the college posted on its Facebook page Monday. “The Brookdale Police are actively investigating this matter. Brookdale takes this behavior very seriously and does not tolerate any form of harassment. Our sincerest apologies to Gabby Schilling. Her achievement should be celebrated and not clouded by offensive comments.”

Each Twitter account mentioned in Schilling’s blog has been suspended or is no longer in use.

Another Twitter user mentioned by Schilling in his blog was fired from his job selling tickets part-time with the New York Yankees, Jason Zillo, the team’s director of communications, confirmed to NJ.com. The Yankees did not respond to a request for comment from ABC News.

The two individuals did not respond to a request for comment from ABC News.

“This wasn’t a mistake,” Schilling said. “This was a conscious decision to be an idiot and to say some evil stuff.”

Gabby Schilling added: “Nobody should be able to get away with saying things like that to a father about their daughter.”

http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/red-sox-pitcher-curt-schilling-knocks-internet-trolls/story?id=29351199

at 9:02 pm

An Easier Way to Fight Bullying?

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http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/03/03/an-easier-way-to-fight-bullying/

at 9:02 pm

Anti-bullying policy approved for Nashville parks

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http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/2015/03/03/anti-bullying-policy-approved-nashville-parks/24328783/

at 9:01 pm

Lawsuit settled over allegation of bullying of gay students

The Southern Poverty Law Center has announced a settlement of its federal lawsuit alleging that gay students were routinely bullied in a south Mississippi school district.

In a statement Wednesday, the law center said the Moss Point School District has agreed to adopt and implement new anti-bullying and discrimination policies and procedures, as well as equal educational opportunity policies to prohibit bullying and harassment based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

SPLC staff attorney Anjali Nair said complaints by students, parents and guardians will now quickly be brought to the attention of teachers and administrators.

The SPLC sued the district in December 2013 on behalf of Destin Holmes, now 18, but it also said other gay and transgender students, or those who are perceived to be, were subjected to mistreatment.

http://www.wapt.com/news/mississippi/lawsuit-settled-over-allegation-of-bullying-of-gay-students/31474488

at 3:02 pm

Seminar on campus addresses LGBTQ bullying in schools



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Students have the chance to intimately discuss sexuality with high school students from across the country today — all without leaving Chapel Hill. 

Jessica Fields and Jen Gilbert of San Francisco State University and York University respectively, are among the advocates for LGBT acceptance. The two professors are hosting a
seminar titled “Beyond Bulling: Stories of LGBTQ Sexuality in Schools” today. 

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 “The
question is: How can we think about LGBTQ sexuality in schools beyond the frame
of bullying?” Fields said. “We think that framework limits teachers’ and
students’ conversations, and Beyond Bullying allows students and teachers the
opportunity to affirm that their sexuality is ordinary.”  


ATTEND THE EVENT

Time: 6:30 p.m., Tuesday 

Location: Murphey Hall.

The presentation — one that features storytelling in multimedia formats — is the culmination of
years of research conducted by the Beyond Bullying program. Beyond Bullying, created by
Fields and Gilbert as well as Nancy Lesko and Laura Mamo, conducted
research at three American high schools through the use of “Storytelling
Booths.” 

The booths are
designed to provide students a safe, secure environment to share stories of
relationships, friendships, heartbreak and comfort. The stories told in these
booths are recorded, and excerpts will be screened at the lecture.

“Inside, students can tell their story — about
friendship, breakups, coming out — without interruption or judgment. They can
explore their own ideas without interruption from an adult,” Fields said.

The presentation will
feature a lecture from the presenters as well as digital storytelling, but the
ultimate goal of the event is to continue the conversation about LGBT sexuality at UNC.

We are hoping the presentation
will be somewhat interactive — we’ll have lecture and screen different stories,
but ultimately we want to have a conversation with the students in attendance,” Gilbert 
said.

This conversation, according to Fields, is the
key to addressing the changing face of LGBT culture in North Carolina and
across the nation.

“I wrote my dissertation on sexual education in
North Carolina, and in the last 15 years the conversation has really grown to
think about addressing the needs of LGBTQ families, teachers and students,” Fields said. “And as we take on that challenge our project aims to expand our
understanding of those needs and create ways to address them.”

For some students, attending UNC affords a rare
opportunity for addressing these and other issues, but it also imbues in them a
sense of responsibility.

“As a large public
university, I think it’s important to have these sorts of events that confront
large issues, such as bullying and sexuality, especially as an educational
leader,” said freshman Eric New, who plans to attend the event. 

Events such as these
encourage a sense of community on campus, according to New.

“Such a large and
diverse student population hosts so many different ideas — it’s important to be
accepting because you’re accepting not strangers but friends and classmates,” New said.

Ultimately, this
sense of community is what the presentation boils down to. Instead of focusing
on bullying, the presentation focuses on the positive stories shared by LGBT teens. According to freshman Isaac Cassedy, who also plans to attend the
event, these positive stories are the ones that need to be shared. 

“This kind of event
is important because hostility towards members of the LGBTQ community exists,” Cassedy said. “It’s still apparent in society. College campuses are centers for
learning and acceptance, and it’s important to introduce people to positive
stories about LGBTQ life.”

The life of an LGBT teen should not be defined by persecution for their sexuality. To Fields, “Beyond Bullying” aims to reaffirm the fact
that the life of an LGBT teen should be an ordinary and a happy one.

“We are trying to say that LGBTQ sexuality exists
sometimes in relationship to bullying but not always — and we need to identify
ways in which they are separate.” 

arts@dailytarheel.com 


http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2015/03/seminar-on-campus-addresses-lgbtq-bullying-in-schools

at 3:02 pm

Bullying cited in middle school student’s suicide

LAS VEGAS (KSNV MyNews3) – Bullying has claimed another life in Las Vegas – this time a 14-year-old girl who, after years of counseling and reports of bullying, took her own life on Friday.

Family and friends are mourning the loss of Carla Jamerson, a student at Canarelli Middle School in southwest Las Vegas.

Nakita Bird, Carla’s mother, tells News 3 that she had been bullied since she was in kindergarten, bullied on Facebook and was in counseling trying to deal with her depression.

“She used to tell me so many times she just didn’t understand why the world was so cruel,” Bird said. “A lot of people can’t say much except I’m sorry. And I’m not saying it’s not recognized but I’m sorry is not going to bring my daughter back.”

Bird says she asked school officials about the bullying while her daughter was still alive. And she was told there was no bullying and that the problems must have been at home.

http://www.mynews3.com/content/news/story/ccsd-las-vegas-jamerson-student-suicide-bullying/RlZX7Vy7tkCgvGFElUo5Tg.cspx

at 3:02 pm

Round Rock ISD battles bullying with anonymous app

Anonymous-Alerts

ROUND ROCK, Texas (KXAN) — Students in Round Rock can use what’s probably already in their pocket — a cellphone — to battle bullying in their hallways. Round Rock Independent School District officials have launched the Anonymous Alerts® program at its middle and high school campuses in an effort to empower students to report bullying, threats, weapons and drug-related activity at school. All reports are completely anonymous and will be sent directly to school officials. Students also have the option to reveal their identity during the process to have a person-to-person discussion.

Students can get to the service using the Anonymous Alerts® app, which can be found in the Apple App Store and Google Play. A two-way text message between the student and school official can be accessed within the app to have a private, encrypted conversation.

“Message topics may include bullying, cyber-bullying, family difficulties, self-harm, cutting, drug and alcohol abuse, student depression, harassment, weapon-related issues or abnormal student behavior,” say school officials. “Anonymous Alerts® is not a 24-hour crisis hotline and will only be monitored during school days and school hours.”

To submit a report, the student must select a school building and a person to contact, then select the incident and explain what happened. Students also have the option to add a photo or screenshot to the incident report.

http://kxan.com/2015/03/03/round-rock-isd-battles-bullying-with-anonymous-app/

at 3:02 pm

Study: Most people who witness online abuse ignore it

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

The vast majority of students who witness cyberbullying don’t do anything about it, at least not right away, a new study has found.

BLAIR: It's difficult to define cyberbullying

BLAIR: It’s difficult to define cyberbullying

Researchers analyzed the reactions of 221 students who watched a fellow student being bullied in an online chat room. Only 10 percent of those who noticed the abuse intervened directly.

The abuse wasn’t real – it was an experiment – but the participants didn’t know that.

“The results didn’t surprise me,” said Kelly Dillon, lead author of the study and a doctoral candidate at Ohio State University. “Many other studies have shown bystanders are reluctant to get involved when they see bullying. The results disappointed me, as a human, but they didn’t surprise me as a scientist.”

However, despite that lack of direct intervention, two-thirds of the participants who noticed the bullying intervened indirectly by giving the bully or the chat room a bad review when the opportunity arose.

“Most of the people didn’t stand up to the bully but, behind the scenes, they did judge the bully harshly and try to pass that information on later when the incident was over,” Dillon said.

The study appears in the April 2015 issue of the journal “Computers in Human Behavior.” It corroborates findings by a University of New Mexico communications specialist whose 2010 master’s thesis looked at bullying by and of adolescents. Cinnamon Blair, UNM’s chief marketing and communications officer, called her thesis “The Coliseum Effect,” likening cyberbullying to the infamous audience participation in gory spectacles in ancient Rome’s Colosseum.

Blair set out to find the nature of electronic aggression in youth and corresponding mental health impacts. She concluded that “aspects of electronic communication encourage youth to act aggressively, prompting them to do things they would not think to attempt in the physical world.”

At the same time, she found, “adults are so out of touch that they are often unaware of the prevalence of electronic aggression … let alone being aware of how to control or reduce it,” adding, the “unsettling truth is that neither the Roman spectator nor the electronic one is merely an innocent bystander watching other people’s humiliation and conflict, but rather an active accomplice in the creation and staging of these events.”

In an interview, Blair emphasized the difficulty of defining cyberbullying. A physical bully repeats his or her demeaning actions again and again. A cyberbully may act only once but, due to the nature of the Internet, the event can be picked up and rebroadcast hundreds, thousands, even millions of times.

Dillon said that while it would be difficult to extrapolate the findings to New Mexico, the results here would probably be similar.” In general, “people don’t like to get involved, whether it’s a schoolyard bully, an online harasser, someone on the side of the road, or a parent admonishing a child harshly in a store.”

http://www.abqjournal.com/548953/news/study-most-people-ignore-online-abuse.html

at 3:01 pm

Study says cyberbullying doesn’t stop after high school

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

(CNN) — “I hope she sees this and kills herself.” – message to Amanda Todd

“The world would be a better place without you.” – message to Megan Meier

Infamous quotes from famous cases of teenage cyberbullying, each ending tragically with the victim taking her life. Heartbreaking cases like these galvanized research and today much more is known about the damaging effects of cyberbullying among middle and high school students — including an increased risk for depression, substance abuse, suicidal thoughts, hostility and delinquency.

What about college students? After all, they’re the most frequent users of digital technology and social media sites. Will their increased maturity and experience keep them safe?

Not so much, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin. Questioning 265 girls enrolled in four colleges, researchers found college-age females just as likely to suffer the negative effects of cyberbullying as younger adolescents.

“That’s a jump off the page,” said study co-author Dr. Megan Moreno. “This is the type of bullying that is going beyond those childhood and adolescent years and into young adulthood.”

The study found college girls who reported being cyberbullied were three times more likely to meet clinical criteria for depression. And if the cyberbullying was connected to unwanted sexual advances, the odds of depression doubled.

“A six-fold increase in the odds for depression when there was fallout from unwanted sexual advances or fallout from a romantic relationship was very striking,” said Moreno. “These are not innocuous actions. These are actions that really can trigger depression and really can lead to damage to the people who are involved. ”

A 2014 survey about online harassment by the Pew Research Center found 26% of 18-24 year-old-women say they’ve been stalked online, while 25% say they were the target of online sexual harassment.

“Some people have hypothesized that cyberbullying in that context — unwanted sexual advances — really starts to look like it should be on the spectrum of sexual violence rather than bullying,” said Moreno.

Cyberbullies suffer too. Girls who bully have a four times higher risk for depression than those who don’t. The study also found they’re also more likely to have a drinking problem.

“For problem alcohol abuse, it was really the bullies that struggled, and not the victims,” said Moreno.

The study didn’t take a look at other mental health impacts, such as suicidal thoughts. Moreno says that was deliberate.

“Those cases are so extreme — and they are so horrible — but at the same time what we were hearing [from girls] in our studies is this is something that is happening all the time to a lot of us and we want to know what else can happen,” said Moreno.

“If we don’t kill ourselves are we at risk for something else?” is a frequent question Moreno hears. “Is there something else bad that happens to me as a victim, or does something bad happen to that bully that’s been picking on me?”

Girls who experience cyberbullying are encouraged to get help by visiting their college clinic to talk about their experience, their growing feelings of depression or their substance abuse.

“There are potential health impacts,” says Moreno. “This should be in the public health arena. Girls should not feel like they can’t go to clinic and talk about their feelings.”

Atlanta advocate Helen Ho agrees. She’s the founding director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice and spends a good deal of her time on cyberbullying issues. Research shows Asian Americans are digitally bullied at least four times as often as other ethnicities.

One of the frustrating things about being an advocate against cyberbullying,” says Ho, “is that a lot of people don’t realize how intense cyberbullying can be in this kind of high-technology age and the physical as well as mental impact it can have.”

“For many of us who are adults and didn’t grow up with online access, we can see that distinction between online and offline very clearly,” adds Moreno. “But for youth, there isn’t a distinction. We used to say either online or real world, and youth say ‘No, no, you don’t get it, online IS my real world’.”

http://wqad.com/2015/03/03/study-says-cyberbullying-doesnt-stop-after-high-school/

at 9:01 am

Schweich’s death casts harsh light on bullying within Missouri GOP

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich’s suicide last Thursday has prompted an outpouring of grief and remorse. But if the Missouri Republican Party sincerely wants to honor Schweich’s memory, beginning with his funeral on Tuesday, it will take a hard look at the way it conducts its business.

Politics is a contact sport, and Schweich knew that when he entered a GOP primary against an establishment candidate, former Missouri House Speaker Catherine Hanaway. But, although the reasons for his suicide remain unknown, a campaign was underway by elements within the party to bully and isolate the auditor.

Schweich was the target of a nasty radio ad that ridiculed his appearance, called him a weak candidate and falsely accused Schweich of being a pawn for the Democrats. The style of the low-ball ad is very similar to a commercial that Kansas City consultant Jeff Roe’s firm, Axiom Strategies, used last year against Greg Orman, the independent U.S. Senate candidate from Kansas.

Roe and Axiom work for Hanaway’s campaign, which is being bankrolled by more than $1 million from Rex Sinquefield, the mega-donor from St. Louis.

The controversial ad was paid for by a committee called “Citizens for Fairness in Missouri.” Its treasurer is Seth Shumaker, a lawyer from Kirksville, Mo., who has been suspended for unprofessional conduct. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has reported that Shumaker filed six Sunshine Law requests with the auditor’s office, asking for nearly all of Schweich’s email correspondence while in office, as well as calendars and expense reports. Along with this fishing expedition, Shumaker had set up a phony Facebook page purporting to be linked to Schweich.

At the state Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Days meeting in Kansas City the weekend before his death, Schweich watched a couple of his allies on the state committee be replaced by people he considered less friendly. And he was distraught that the party elected John Hancock as its chairman.

Schweich had worried that Hancock had inaccurately told at least a couple of people that Schweich was Jewish. In Schweich’s mind, this was the equivalent of an anti-Semitic whisper campaign.

Hancock has said he thought for a time that Schweich was Jewish, and the misconception may have come up in conversations.

The dispute raises some burning questions. One is why Hancock, who specializes in candidate research, would not have known Schweich was Episcopalian. Another is why he was discussing a candidate’s religious or ethnic background at all. Hancock appears too damaged to continue as the chairman of a state Republican Party that should be striving for reform.

Schweich was easily angered and inclined to take things too personally. The personal attacks and torrent of oppositional research, coming a year and a half before the 2016 primary, were clearly designed to agitate the auditor and provoke a damaging outburst.

It is a case of party fratricide.

Missouri Republicans are ideally positioned to devour their own. The state has no contribution limits, and it has a wealthy individual, Sinquefield, who will spare no expense to elect candidates to support his causes. Roe is known as one of the nation’s most ruthless political operators. Campaigns quickly become expensive and vicious.

Schweich has been a disruptive force in Missouri Republican politics ever since he burst upon the scene five years ago with the audacious idea of mounting a primary challenge to then-U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt for an open U.S. Senate seat.

As state auditor, he fearlessly called out corruption in small towns and at the highest levels of state government. As a candidate for governor, he was taking the fight to his own party.

That fight was cut short in the most tragic manner. It is now the loss of Tom Schweich that should disrupt the Missouri Republican Party.

http://www.kansascity.com/opinion/editorials/article11939504.html

at 9:01 am

West Oso High School trying to combat bullying

 

http://www.kristv.com/story/28242689/2015/03/02/west-oso-high-school-trying-to-combat-bullying

at 9:01 am

House committee passes anti-bullying bill

A House committee approved anti-bullying legislation Monday, moving it one step closer to final passage following Senate committee approval last week.

The House version of the bill was approved 19-4 and would include $150,000 for training programs and $50,000 to fund a student mentorship pilot program.

The Senate version does not include that funding in the bill itself. It would have to move separately through the Appropriations Committee, which creates some risk that the bill would pass but the money would not.

Rep. Quentin Stanerson, R-Center Point, said he thought the funding was an important piece of the bill.

“We didn’t want it to be seen as an unfunded mandate,” he said.

However, Tedd Gassman, R-Scarville, said the added funding strikes him as “completely out of the question.” He voted against the bill.

Stanerson said everything else about the two versions of the bill will line up, but the House and Senate will need to come to an agreement about funding when the issue comes up for floor debate.

The legislation, which has been a priority for Gov. Terry Branstad, would make it easier for school officials to address incidents of bullying that happen off school grounds or over the Internet.

According to a recent Iowa Poll, 73 percent of Iowans say they support anti-bullying legislation and 23 percent say they are opposed to it.

Gassman said he plans to vote against the legislation on the House floor.

“I’ve talked to every administrator in my district about this one way or another one time or another, and I’ve not found one that thinks they need more legislation, more rules or more regulation to control bullying,” he said.

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/politics/2015/03/02/iowa-house-committee-approves-bullying-law/24297443/

at 3:01 am

The health risks of cyberbullying in college

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

 “I hope she sees this and kills herself.” – message to Amanda Todd

“The world would be a better place without you.” – message to Megan Meier

Infamous quotes from famous cases of teenage cyberbullying, each ending tragically with the victim taking her life. Heartbreaking cases like these galvanized research and today much more is known about the damaging effects of cyberbullying among middle and high school students — including an increased risk for depression, substance abuse, suicidal thoughts, hostility and delinquency.

What about college students? After all, they’re the most frequent users of digital technology and social media sites. Will their increased maturity and experience keep them safe?

Not so much, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin. Questioning 265 girls enrolled in four colleges, researchers found college-age females just as likely to suffer the negative effects of cyberbullying as younger adolescents.

“That’s a jump off the page,” said study co-author Dr. Megan Moreno. “This is the type of bullying that is going beyond those childhood and adolescent years and into young adulthood.”

The study found college girls who reported being cyberbullied were three times more likely to meet clinical criteria for depression. And if the cyberbullying was connected to unwanted sexual advances, the odds of depression doubled.

“A six-fold increase in the odds for depression when there was fallout from unwanted sexual advances or fallout from a romantic relationship was very striking,” said Moreno. “These are not innocuous actions. These are actions that really can trigger depression and really can lead to damage to the people who are involved. “

A 2014 survey about online harassment by the Pew Research Center found 26% of 18-24 year-old-women say they’ve been stalked online, while 25% say they were the target of online sexual harassment.

“Some people have hypothesized that cyberbullying in that context — unwanted sexual advances — really starts to look like it should be on the spectrum of sexual violence rather than bullying,” said Moreno.

Cyberbullies suffer too. Girls who bully have a four times higher risk for depression than those who don’t. The study also found they’re also more likely to have a drinking problem.

“For problem alcohol abuse, it was really the bullies that struggled, and not the victims,” said Moreno.

The study didn’t take a look at other mental health impacts, such as suicidal thoughts. Moreno says that was deliberate.

“Those cases are so extreme — and they are so horrible — but at the same time what we were hearing [from girls] in our studies is this is something that is happening all the time to a lot of us and we want to know what else can happen,” said Moreno.

“If we don’t kill ourselves are we at risk for something else?” is a frequent question Moreno hears. “Is there something else bad that happens to me as a victim, or does something bad happen to that bully that’s been picking on me?”

Girls who experience cyberbullying are encouraged to get help by visiting their college clinic to talk about their experience, their growing feelings of depression or their substance abuse.

“There are potential health impacts,” says Moreno. “This should be in the public health arena. Girls should not feel like they can’t go to clinic and talk about their feelings.”

Atlanta advocate Helen Ho agrees. She’s the founding director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice and spends a good deal of her time on cyberbullying issues. Research shows Asian Americans are digitally bullied at least four times as often as other ethnicities.

One of the frustrating things about being an advocate against cyberbullying,” says Ho, “is that a lot of people don’t realize how intense cyberbullying can be in this kind of high-technology age and the physical as well as mental impact it can have.”

“For many of us who are adults and didn’t grow up with online access, we can see that distinction between online and offline very clearly,” adds Moreno. “But for youth, there isn’t a distinction. We used to say either online or real world, and youth say ‘No, no, you don’t get it, online IS my real world’.”

The-CNN-Wire
™ © 2015 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

http://www.ketknbc.com/news/the-health-risks-of-cyberbullying-in-college

March 2, 2015 at 9:01 pm

School Committee To Choose New Boston Schools Superintendent Tuesday

Posted by in School
From left to right: Guadalupe Guerrero, Tommy Chang, Dana Bedden and Pedro Martinez. (Courtesy BPS)

Nearly two years after Boston Public Schools Superintendent Carol Johnson announced her retirement after almost six years on the job, city schools are about to get a new leader.

The Boston School Committee votes Tuesday night on the new school superintendent from four finalists. All four are men — two are Latino, one is Black and one is Asian.

They all tout track records of tackling tough issues with challenging school populations. And they all list closing achievement gaps, improving graduation rates and programs for English language learners as top priorities for the Boston schools.

Guadalupe Guerrero

The only candidate with any experience in the Boston Schools is Guadalupe Guerrero. He is currently a deputy superintendent in San Francisco. He worked in Boston for 10 years, first as a teacher and then as the principal of the Dever School in Dorchester.

Guerrero says his dream is to become a school superintendent, and that finding the right timing to pursue this dream has been a major part of his decision to apply in Boston now.

“I’ve had a very deliberate career, traditional pathway of successive leadership roles. I’m trained to be a superintendent, I intend to be a superintendent,” he said. “The issue for me has been, when is the right situation? When is the right time?”

Guerrero left Boston in 2008 to return to the San Francisco Bay Area, where he grew up, but says he has remained connected to Boston.

“I [came] back to the Boston area, I have for the last several years, just because I’m a doctoral, I’ve been a doctoral student,” he said.

Guerrero’s application had said he was on hiatus from a doctoral program at Harvard University’s graduate school of education. But Harvard says Guerrero was terminated from the program. The online application now no longer mentions the doctoral program.

Tommy Chang

Guerrero lists improving English language learning as a top priority for schools, and candidate Tommy Chang says such programs are a particularly strong concern for him.

“As an English learner, I went through a difficult time transitioning in this country, because I did not know the language,” Chang said.

Chang is an area schools superintendent in Los Angeles. He came to this country from Taiwan.

“I’m an immigrant. I came here at the age of 6 because my parents believed there were greater opportunities for my brother and I,” he said.

In Los Angeles, the former biology teacher has developed special schools for students with the greatest challenges, including those with language barriers and physical disabilities.

“In terms of students with disabilities, I have seen too often students segregated in school settings because of their disabilities,” he said. “It is a travesty that students who could be in the general ed setting, safely and productively, it is a travesty seeing them segregated.

“That inclusive environment was not only better for kids with disabilities, but for all students on campus,” he said.

Another major concern for Chang is the technology gap in Boston schools.

“Imagine the power of students in Boston if they all had access to technology so they could weigh in on the issues that matter most to them,” he said.

Dana Bedden

The technology gap is a concern shared by superintendent candidate Dana Bedden, who is currently superintendent of schools in Richmond, Virginia. Of the final four, he is the only candidate who is a sitting superintendent.

He sees Boston as fertile ground for mining resources to help public schools.

“Most people would tell you that in our industry, we see Boston has a lot of opportunity with its infrastructure. It has a lot of opportunity with the resources around it, with your higher ed, your business community,” he said. “There is a desire to be innovative.”

Bedden has been an education professional for more than 20 years. He was a regional superintendent in Philadelphia, before heading school districts in Pennsylvania, Georgia and Texas. He has only been in Richmond for about a year.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe and top education officials in that state are urging him to stay. Bedden says he’s only thinking of changing jobs so soon now, because it’s Boston.

“The tilting of the scales was because of what the position and where the position was, and the rarity of the opportunity in Boston,” he said. “Because I don’t come into the situation thinking it’s going to be easy. It’s not going to be a piece of cake.”

Pedro Martinez

The final candidate is a man with a name that’s beloved among sports fans here. Pedro Martinez says he’s used to people associating him with the soon-to-be Red Sox Hall of Fame pitcher.

For example, at fundraising events for the Catholic archdiocese of Chicago, Martinez said his name was frequently recognized.

“We always had pre-seating so people knew who was coming,” he explained. “So it was a lot of big donors from the community, and they would see the name ‘Pedro Martinez,’ and they’d look at me, and then they’d be disappointed. You know, I always took it in stride.”

Martinez has never been a teacher nor a principal. With degrees in accounting and finance, he began work in the financial industry and then became chief financial officer with the Chicago Public Schools system. He later became a deputy superintendent at two school districts in Nevada before becoming superintendent of the Washoe School District — a position he held until last year.

Martinez values performance metrics for schools, and he said he wants to see big improvements in Boston.

“When I look at a graduation rate that’s 67 percent, [with a] 1 percent gain over three years,” he said. “When I look at 36 percent of our children that are proficient at third grade, the low results for AP compared to Reno, Nevada, I see myself.”

By that, Martinez means he sees himself and many children in Boston living the life of the inner city kid, where education makes a difference.

His goal for Boston is to gain a graduation rate of at least 85 percent in a district where all students are proficient in third grade.

The school committee makes its selection at a special meeting Tuesday night at 6 p.m. Committee members say they’re carefully weighing public comments from meetings last week, as well as comments left on the BPS website.

Related:





http://www.wbur.org/2015/03/02/boston-schools-superintendent-finalists

at 9:01 pm

Monmouth County delayed school openings for Monday, March 2

Posted by in School

Due to inclement weather, schools throughout Monmouth County announced that they would have delayed openings on Monday, March 2.

Below is our list of the school districts that are affected:

Asbury Park Public Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Atlantic Highlands School District – Delayed opening

Brielle School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Brookdale Community College – Delayed opening

Christian Brothers Academy – Delayed opening

Collier High School – 90-minute delayed opening

Colts Neck School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Deal School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Eatontown Public Schools – 90-minute delayed opening

Fair Haven Public Schools – 90-minute delayed opening

Freehold Borough Schools – 90-minute delayed opening

Freehold Regional High School District – 90-minute delayed opening

Freehold Township Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Hazlet Township Public Schools – 90-minute delayed opening

Henry Hudson Regional High School – Two-hour delayed opening

Highlands School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Holmdel Township Public Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Howell Township Public Schools – 90-minute delayed opening

Keansburg School District – Delayed opening

Keyport Public Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Little Silver School District – Delayed opening

Long Branch School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District – 90-minute delayed opening

Marlboro Township Public School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Matawan-Aberdeen Regional School District – 90-minute delayed opening

Mater Dei Prep – 90-minute delayed opening

Middletown Public School District – Delayed opening

Millstone Township Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Monmouth Beach School District – Delayed opening

Monmouth Regional High School – Delayed opening

Neptune City School District – Delayed opening

Neptune Township Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Ocean Township School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Oceanport Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Red Bank Borough Public Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

Red Bank Catholic High School – Delayed opening

Red Bank Charter School – Delayed opening

Red Bank Regional High School – Delayed opening

Roosevelt Public School District – Delayed opening

Rumson School District – 90-minute delayed opening

Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School – Delayed opening

St. John Vianney High School – Two-hour delayed opening

St. Rose High School – 90-minute delayed opening

Shore Regional School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Shrewsbury Borough School District – 10:30 a.m. delayed opening

Spring Lake Heights School District – Delayed opening

Tinton Falls School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Union Beach School District – Delayed opening

Upper Freehold Regional School District – Two-hour delayed opening

Wall Township Public Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

West Long Branch Public Schools – Two-hour delayed opening

–This list will be updated as more information becomes available.

Rob Spahr may be reached at rspahr@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @TheRobSpahr. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

http://www.nj.com/monmouth/index.ssf/2015/03/monmouth_county_delayed_school_openings_for_monday.html

at 3:01 pm

Senators Threaten Budget Cuts For Schools That Don’t Stop Bullying

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Missouri state senators have reacted to a report of the beating of an autistic boy at a Kansas City-area middle school with a threat to cut funding when schools don’t prevent such incidents.

A 12-year-old boy spent several days in the hospital and suffered a fractured jaw and skull and damaged inner ear after the attack at the Liberty Middle School. His family says it had warned school officials that the attacker had bullied his older brother and says those warnings went unheeded.

Senator Ryan Silvey (R-Kansas City) said that part of the story, reported extensively by the Kansas City Star, troubled him.

“The grandfather, according to the news reports, sent a certified letter weeks ahead of time. Certified, which means that he knew that something was going to happen and he knew that unfortunately when it happened, he was going to have to prove that he tried to warn them,” said Silvey.

Talking with Silvey, whose district includes Liberty, and other senators in the state Senate chamber, Senator Eric Schmitt (R-Glendale) said it sounds as though Liberty school officials failed in their jobs.

“I don’t know what has to happen for some of these folks to start paying attention, but I think part of the strategy might be, you know what? All the dollars that you claim that you … some of that might be at risk if you don’t do your job,” said Schmitt.

He spoke with the Senate Budget Committee Chairman, Kurt Schafer (R-Columbia) about keeping the Liberty story in mind during the budget process that will unfold in the next couple of months.

“For us to begin to think of ways to have carrots and sticks,” said Schmitt, “when it comes to people not doing their job who get millions of dollars from the state every year.”

Schmitt says he will again handle legislation to require schools to have an anti-bullying policy.  Such bills have stalled in past sessions over a disagreement between Republicans and Democrats about whether to specify what groups a policy would protect, such people who identify as having a certain sexual orientation, race or religion.

(Mike Lear, Missourinet)

http://www.ozarksfirst.com/story/d/story/senators-threaten-budget-cuts-schools-bullying/41150/SSdzwDXbCUmoue6QD-KRVA

at 3:01 pm

Family forum to look at bullying, substance use

Springfield Schools will host a family forum on bullying and substance abuse Saturday. Leaders in education and health care will present strategies for identifying and preventing bullying and addressing abuse of prescription medications and other substances.

The free event runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Holland Free Methodist Church, 6605 Angola Rd, Holland. Registration is required.

The forum includes a free lunch and is open to families throughout the Toledo area.

The district partnered with federal and state departments of education and the University of Toledo and others to offer the event.

For more information or to register call Springfield Schools at 419-867-5600 and select option 8.


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http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2015/03/02/Family-forum-to-look-at-bullying-substance-use.html

at 3:01 pm

Bully Victims and Bullies at High Risk for Suicidal Thoughts

Bullies as well as their victims are at risk for suicide and suicidal thoughts, a BU-led study discovered.

Headline-making tragedies like the suicide of Massachusetts teen Phoebe Prince in 2010 have established the connection between being bullied and self-destruction. What you might not know is that bullies themselves are at risk for suicidal behaviors or thoughts—and those who have been both bullies and bullied are at the highest risk of all.

So found a metastudy led by Melissa Holt, a School of Education assistant professor of counseling psychology. Published recently online in the journal Pediatrics, the research combed 47 studies, done between 1990 and 2013 and involving more than a half million subjects, to compare bullying participants with youths who have never pushed others around or been pushed around. The association between bullying involvement and suicidal thoughts or actions wasn’t stronger for either girls or boys, the metastudy found.

Holt’s interest in bullying was fostered by the two years she spent as a behavioral scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prior to joining the BU faculty four years ago. Her personal circumstances—she’s the mother of three—reinforce her academic passion to study the topic, she says.

BU Today: What is more likely to lead to suicide or suicidal thoughts—being a bully, being bullied, or being both?

Holt: The kids most likely to report suicidal thoughts or behaviors are the kids who both perpetrate, and are targeted by, bullying behaviors—“bully-victims.” That wasn’t surprising, as we know from other research that those are the kids at greatest risk for psychological distress in general. The kids victimized by bullying were slightly more likely than kids who perpetrate bullying to engage in suicidal behaviors or have suicidal thoughts.

For the kids who were bully-victims, suicidal thoughts or behavior were about four times more likely than for the kids who were uninvolved in bullying. For the victims, it would be about two times more likely for suicidal thoughts and about three times more likely for suicidal behaviors. For kids who engaged in bullying perpetration, it would be about two times more likely for suicidal thoughts and almost three times more likely for suicidal behaviors. So it’s pretty significant.

SED’s Melissa Holt scoured 47 studies of bullying to find its connections to suicide. Photo by Vernon Doucett

What percentage of kids overall are involved in bullying? How big a problem is this?

In the United States, about 30 percent of kids are involved in bullying in some capacity. If you think about kids not very frequently involved, it’s a lot of kids. But if we think about kids experiencing it more frequently, it’s about 30 percent.

The difficulty, I take it, in researching this was defining what counts as bullying versus just aggression.

Absolutely. It’s very debated in the field. We followed the CDC definition on bullying, which is essentially repeated aggressive behavior that occurs over time, in this case between two peers. It would have some intention of harming the person, either physically or emotionally. Bullying has got to have that repeated nature to it, the one caveat being that if you had reason to believe that the aggression could happen again, that could qualify as bullying.

A power imbalance is one of the big keys to bullying. It doesn’t have to be physical. It could be that someone is more popular than you or more athletic. A fight between two friends who are equal in power on a school playground wouldn’t meet the criteria.

Is physical or emotional bullying, online or off, the stronger predictor of suicide or suicidal thoughts?

We couldn’t look at that. That’s something we think is important to look at in the future. There weren’t enough studies that just assessed relational bullying.

Lots of people are bullied and don’t commit or attempt suicide. Why do some victims take that step?

This article does not say that bullying by itself causes suicide. There’s a host of other factors—for example, a history of depression—in addition to being targeted. 

I think most readers could understand why a victim of repeated bullying would contemplate suicide. But why would a bully?

Something that often gets overlooked are the mental health needs of the kids who engage in perpetrating. Those youths, as well as victims and bully-victims, are more likely than uninvolved youths to experience other forms of victimization. For example, they’re more likely to experience child maltreatment or dating violence. 

Is enough being done now—in schools, by parents, by researchers—to address this problem? Or are we falling down?

In recent years, there’s certainly been a lot more attention to addressing bullying and the mental health effects or educational effects, but I think educators and mental health professionals having this knowledge—that there is this increased likelihood of suicide—on their radar would help. It’s surprising probably to some people that perpetrators experience more suicide. If you’re an educator or school guidance counselor, it’s important to address the perpetrators’ behaviors, but also to inquire about their mental health status and whether they’re experiencing suicidal thoughts—to not just think of them as acting out.

In Massachusetts, it’s mandated that there be bullying prevention programs in schools. We know from research that the best programs are whole-school approach programs, targeting everyone in the school, regardless of bullying environment. For example, if you could encourage all kids to become active bystanders, that could help reduce bullying.


+ Comments

http://www.bu.edu/today/2015/bully-victims-and-bulliers-at-high-risk-for-sucidal-thoughts/

at 9:02 am

State tries again on anti-bullying package






DES MOINES — How best to address bullying incidents in Iowa’s schools is an issue the governor and state lawmakers have wrestled with for three years.

Gov. Terry Branstad has made anti-bullying programs one of his top priorities, a

http://thegazette.com/subject/news/state-tries-again-on-anti-bullying-package-20150301

at 9:01 am

Bully Victims and Bulliers at High Risk for Suicidal Thoughts

Bullies as well as their victims are at risk for suicide and suicidal thoughts, a BU-led study discovered.

Headline-making tragedies like the suicide of Massachusetts teen Phoebe Prince in 2010 have established the connection between being bullied and self-destruction. What you might not know is that bullies themselves are at risk for suicidal behaviors or thoughts—and those who have been both bullies and bullied are at the highest risk of all.

So found a metastudy led by Melissa Holt, a School of Education assistant professor of counseling psychology. Published recently online in the journal Pediatrics, the research combed 47 studies, done between 1990 and 2013 and involving more than a half million subjects, to compare bullying participants with youths who have never pushed others around or been pushed around. The association between bullying involvement and suicidal thoughts or actions wasn’t stronger for either girls or boys, the metastudy found.

Holt’s interest in bullying was fostered by the two years she spent as a behavioral scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prior to joining the BU faculty four years ago. Her personal circumstances—she’s the mother of three—reinforce her academic passion to study the topic, she says.

BU Today: What is more likely to lead to suicide or suicidal thoughts—being a bully, being bullied, or being both?

Holt: The kids most likely to report suicidal thoughts or behaviors are the kids who both perpetrate, and are targeted by, bullying behaviors—“bully-victims.” That wasn’t surprising, as we know from other research that those are the kids at greatest risk for psychological distress in general. The kids victimized by bullying were slightly more likely than kids who perpetrate bullying to engage in suicidal behaviors or have suicidal thoughts.

For the kids who were bully-victims, suicidal thoughts or behavior were about four times more likely than for the kids who were uninvolved in bullying. For the victims, it would be about two times more likely for suicidal thoughts and about three times more likely for suicidal behaviors. For kids who engaged in bullying perpetration, it would be about two times more likely for suicidal thoughts and almost three times more likely for suicidal behaviors. So it’s pretty significant.

SED’s Melissa Holt scoured 47 studies of bullying to find its connections to suicide. Photo by Vernon Doucett

What percentage of kids overall are involved in bullying? How big a problem is this?

In the United States, about 30 percent of kids are involved in bullying in some capacity. If you think about kids not very frequently involved, it’s a lot of kids. But if we think about kids experiencing it more frequently, it’s about 30 percent.

The difficulty, I take it, in researching this was defining what counts as bullying versus just aggression.

Absolutely. It’s very debated in the field. We followed the CDC definition on bullying, which is essentially repeated aggressive behavior that occurs over time, in this case between two peers. It would have some intention of harming the person, either physically or emotionally. Bullying has got to have that repeated nature to it, the one caveat being that if you had reason to believe that the aggression could happen again, that could qualify as bullying.

A power imbalance is one of the big keys to bullying. It doesn’t have to be physical. It could be that someone is more popular than you or more athletic. A fight between two friends who are equal in power on a school playground wouldn’t meet the criteria.

Is physical or emotional bullying, online or off, the stronger predictor of suicide or suicidal thoughts?

We couldn’t look at that. That’s something we think is important to look at in the future. There weren’t enough studies that just assessed relational bullying.

Lots of people are bullied and don’t commit or attempt suicide. Why do some victims take that step?

This article does not say that bullying by itself causes suicide. There’s a host of other factors—for example, a history of depression—in addition to being targeted. 

I think most readers could understand why a victim of repeated bullying would contemplate suicide. But why would a bully?

Something that often gets overlooked are the mental health needs of the kids who engage in perpetrating. Those youths, as well as victims and bully-victims, are more likely than uninvolved youths to experience other forms of victimization. For example, they’re more likely to experience child maltreatment or dating violence. 

Is enough being done now—in schools, by parents, by researchers—to address this problem? Or are we falling down?

In recent years, there’s certainly been a lot more attention to addressing bullying and the mental health effects or educational effects, but I think educators and mental health professionals having this knowledge—that there is this increased likelihood of suicide—on their radar would help. It’s surprising probably to some people that perpetrators experience more suicide. If you’re an educator or school guidance counselor, it’s important to address the perpetrators’ behaviors, but also to inquire about their mental health status and whether they’re experiencing suicidal thoughts—to not just think of them as acting out.

In Massachusetts, it’s mandated that there be bullying prevention programs in schools. We know from research that the best programs are whole-school approach programs, targeting everyone in the school, regardless of bullying environment. For example, if you could encourage all kids to become active bystanders, that could help reduce bullying.


+ Comments

http://www.bu.edu/today/2015/bully-victims-and-bulliers-at-high-risk-for-sucidal-thoughts/