April 16, 2014 at 5:21 am

Maine Township to host anti-bullying workshop April 17 – Niles Herald

pCarrie Goldman nbsp;| nbsp;Submitted/p

Carrie Goldman  |  Submitted

Maine Township is hosting an anti-bullying workshop on April 17 called Bullying and Social Conflict: Prevention, Intervention and Reconciliation. According to the release:

Thursday, April 17 from 7-9 p.m. at Maine Township Town Hall

This free workshop will present a comprehensive approach to addressing bullying prevention, intervention, and reconciliation and will educate parents, teachers, counselors, and students on how to manage social conflict, bullying, and cyberbullying. Drawing from the latest research, Carrie Goldman, award-winning author of Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher, and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear, will offer specific, practical tips on how to effectively manage bullying. You will walk away with ideas you can use right away.

Carrie, an expert in the field of bullying, has received a National Parenting Publication Award and a Mom’s Choice Award, both at the gold medal level, for excellence in educational skills and tools. She helped create the Antibullying Coalition to bring together top bullying prevention groups around the country to advocate for change. Carrie blogs regularly for PsychologyToday.com and the Huffington Post. Her parenting expertise has been featured on NPR, MSNBC, CNN Headline News, Fox News, ABC Radio, WGN TV, and WGN radio. She travels around the country speaking to companies, schools, and community groups about issues such as bullying, digital citizenship in an age of cyberbullying, restorative justice, resolving social conflict, and the cultural effects of gender-based marketing.

Registration is requested as space is limited. CEUs are available. Get more details.

This content was submitted by a member of the community. Submit your news, photos and events to the community news manager at alex@aggrego.com.

http://niles.suntimes.com/submit-content/maine_township_to_host_anti_bullying_workshop_apri-PRA-04152014:article

at 5:21 am

West Morgan Middle School Produces Video On Bullying

TRINITY, Ala. (WHNT) – We’ve all heard plenty lately about bullying, and the effects it has on our students. Well, schools in Morgan County were asked to produce a video on the subject. At West Morgan Middle School, the video turned into a class project that’s made a lasting impression.

Media Specialist Diona Fowler was the photographer and editor for the project. “Ninety percent of middle school, 4th through 8th graders experience being bullied. So our approach was to bring all these kids together and put something together that would bring awareness,” she said.

The 5-minute video produced by West Morgan Middle School students is impactive in its simplicity. The numbers don’t lie.

“56% of students have personally witnessed some type of bullying at school.”

“You just never know, there could be people around you that you don’t even know about that are being bullied but they don’t talk about it because it’s such a bad experience,” 7th grader Colby Crow told us.

The students say learning the statistics has been an eye-opening lesson for them.

“Every school I think has bullying but like some may be worse than others but I think every single school can get fixed to the point it doesn’t happen that much anymore,” says 7th grader Wesley Whisenant.

In talking to each other, the students learned of the experiences others have had, and the fear that some students have come to live with.

“All these numbers counting down like so many millions being bullied and the percentage of how many kids are afraid to do such things but how it only takes one person to say that’s not cool, don’t do that, don’t listen to them, and then that could help them,” says 8th grader Austin Elliott.

And like Austin said, all the numbers boil down to just one, being the one who will speak up.

The students have posted their video to YouTube. You can watch it by clicking HERE.

http://whnt.com/2014/04/15/west-morgan-middle-school-produces-video-on-bullying/

at 5:21 am

Judge orders man to hold bullying sign after taunting disabled kids

An Ohio man served his court-ordered public punishment Sunday, after a judge found that he was anything but neighborly.

This was not a typical sentence, but the situation was not your typical neighbor dispute.

Edmond Aviv, 62, sat at the intersection of Trebisky and Monticello in South Euclid, Ohio, for five hours, holding a handwritten sign that said he was a bully who picks on children with disabilities.

South Euclid Municipal Court Judge Gayle Williams-Byers ordered Aviv to serve this public punishment. It was part of his sentence for harassing his neighbors, the Prugh family, who includes two adopted African-American children with multiple disabilities.

The sign read, in part: “I am a bully. I pick on children that are disabled and I am intolerant of those are different from myself.”

When Fox 8 News Reporter Maria Scali asked Aviv about the sentencing and whether he felt he has bullied the Prugh family, he gave no response to any questions asked.

According to police, there were a number of incidents over the past 15 years involving these next door neighbors that went beyond name calling.

“He shoveled dog feces onto the car, the working vehicle of the one son who’s a caregiver,” Judge Gayle Williams-Byers said.

Jessica King came from Mentor with her son Conner, who has disabilities, to talk directly to Aviv.

“I hope what this judge did to you really shows an example to the community and there’s less ignorance because of this,” she said to him.

Many passersby agreed with the unusual sentence for this unusual bullying case.

“What a disgrace this man is to humanity. Because what he did is inexcusable. Nobody can do something like that to other people,” South Euclid resident Aldo Canzona said.

Gloria Gunter saw Aviv while out walking her dog. She, too, agreed with his sentence.

“He deserves some punishment and public humiliation is a good one.” I don’t feel bad for him. He got pretty much what he deserved,” she said.

In addition to this public punishment, Aviv was sentenced to 15 days in jail. He must perform 100 hours of community service, and he must attend anger management classes.

Speaking for the Prugh family, Michael Prugh said he hopes the situation is now behind them. “Hopefully it’s just the end and we can all just move on,” he said.

For much more on this story, check out our sister station Fox 8′s coverage here.

TM © 2014 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

http://wgntv.com/2014/04/15/judge-orders-man-to-hold-bullying-sign-after-taunting-disabled-kids/

April 15, 2014 at 11:21 pm

Congresswoman Capito tackles cyber bullying

WESTON, W.Va. – Second District Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito wants to put an end to cyber bullying. She’s making her case one school at a time.

Tuesday, Capito teamed up with Robert L. Bland Middle School in Lewis County and Google to talk with kids about the dangers of today’s tech world

“[We're focusing on] how to recognize cyber bullying, what to do about it and how you can have partners with Google and your parents and your teachers to try and prevent this,” according to Capito.

This is the third cyber bullying roundtable Capito has hosted. It’s the first one where students are actively involved. Google put together a 45-minute presentation in a digital gaming format to catch kids attention and keep it, in order to get the word out about the dangers of cyber bullying.

Capito said several high-profile national cases caught her attention.

Capito says no child should ever have to deal with cyber bullying.

“There were a couple stories that just really tore at my heart where girls, in this case, had been cyber bullied, pushed through the Internet, to feel so bad about themselves that they eventually took their own life,” Capito said.

She said that should never happen and it’s important to reach out to students early on.

“In middle school is the perfect age because they’re using social media all the time. We just want to make sure it’s used properly.”

Capito said that includes making sure kids know what is appropriate and when to ask for help.

The congresswoman hopes this will be the first, of many, Google/school partnerships to talk about the issue.

Jennifer Smith

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Comments

  • DWL

    When is she going to tackle the RINO issue she helped create in the Dysfunctional Capital? They are the biggest bunch of bullies to the US taxpayers in general.

  • JTC

    Maybe she should teach school for a week and get a true feel for the issues. Photo op queen!

  • RogerD

    This is all well and good. Ms. Capito probably needs fluff pieces like this a few months before the election. I think many voters would be more interested in knowing her position on the provision being pushed by Cantor and others to give amnesty to illegal immigrants who enlist in the military. This makes little sense at a time when Obama is drawing down military personnel.

    • The bookman

      Agreed Roger! Couldn’t help but roll my eyes when I read that headline. Noble effort on her part, but please get back to work. I’m sure some state or federal program already receives funds to address such issues. Nothing but a photo op and sound byte generator.

  • Mason County Contrarian

    Schools notwithstanding, would some comments posted by readers on this site qualify as “bullying”?

    Just asking……

http://wvmetronews.com/2014/04/15/congresswoman-capito-tackles-cyber-bullying/

at 11:21 pm

Bullitt East posts anti-bullying video – The Courier

The group spent months planning the video, which involved the school’s 1,400 students participating in a one-shot music video, following students lip syncing to Jimmy Eat World’s “The Middle” through lines of their classmates.
Bullitt East

http://www.courier-journal.com/story/communities/2014/04/15/bullitt-east-posts-anti-bullying-video/7740399/

at 11:21 pm

Teen punished for recording alleged bullying wants policy changes, not ‘heads …

shealove.jpg

Shea Love, 40, said her 15-year-old son, Christian, had long been victimized by fellow students in his special education math class at South Fayette High School in McDonald, Pa. So the frustrated teen decided to make an audio recording of the alleged bullying using his iPad, which school officials forced him to delete upon learning of the seven-minute segment in February. He was later convicted of disorderly conduct and fined $25 plus court costs. (Courtesy: Shea Love)

A Pennsylvania teenager convicted of disorderly conduct for recording his alleged tormenters in class wants changes to the district’s zero tolerance policy rather than the wishes of his mother, who wants “heads to roll” for the incident.

Shea Love, 40, said her 15-year-old son, Christian, had long been victimized by fellow students in his special education math class at South Fayette High School in McDonald, Pa. So the frustrated sophomore made an audio recording of the alleged bullying using his iPad, which school officials forced him to delete upon learning of the 7-minute segment in February. He was later convicted of disorderly conduct and fined $25 plus court costs.

“What I want is for heads to roll. But he said to me, ‘Mom, it might make you feel better if people get fired, but that won’t change anything.’ He said there needs to be more compassion for people and changes to the zero tolerance policy.”

- Shea Love

“What I want is for heads to roll,” Love told FoxNews.com. “But he said to me, ‘Mom, it might make you feel better if people get fired, but that won’t change anything.’ He said there needs to be more compassion for people and changes to the zero tolerance policy. I want people’s heads to roll, but my son doesn’t and I have to respect his wishes.”

Love’s son has been diagnosed with comprehension delay and anxiety disorders, as well as ADHD. Love said his special needs can be problematic to some.

“He has a low processing speed, the way he does everything is very slow,” she said. “And some people get very frustrated by that.”

Love said her only child hasn’t been the same since the alleged incident. He has lost at least 10 pounds, requires additional therapy sessions and has missed many days of school, she said.

“This has been just devastating,” Love continued. “I’m a single mom — it’s just him and I — and I feel like they were just trying to get us to shut up. Until people started caring, they didn’t care — and that’s pretty sad.”

Love said school officials, including Principal Scott Milburn and Superintendent Bille Pearce Rondinelli, contacted police for a possible violation of wiretapping laws, but did not discipline the students captured on the audio recording harassing her son.

According to a transcript of a March 19 court hearing obtained by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, the teenager said he made the recording “because I always felt like it wasn’t me being heard.” He said classmates bullied him for several months.

“I wanted some help,” Christian Stanfield said. “This wasn’t just a one-time thing. This always happens every day in that class.”

According to the hearing transcript, district officials forced him to erase the recording and punished him with detention. He was charged with disorderly conduct after police decided the case did not warrant a felony wiretapping charge.

The teen is due to appear in court on April 29 at the Pittsburgh Court of Common Pleas to appeal the disorderly conduct conviction. If those charges are dropped and school officials apologize, Love said she won’t file a civil lawsuit against the district.

“Hopefully they will [apologize], but judging from past actions, I don’t think they will,” Love told FoxNews.com. “Every day he goes to school now and I just wait for a call. It sucks.”

District officials did not return messages seeking comment on Tuesday.

The boy’s attorney, Jonathan Steele, said he expects a forthcoming civil suit regardless of what happens later this month.

“The damage is done,” Steele told FoxNews.com. “In terms of an apology, that’d be great, but the student has already suffered psychological damage, emotional trauma and increased therapy, which he truly needs because of what happened to him. He feels like a criminal.”

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/04/15/teen-punished-for-recording-alleged-bullying-to-sue-school-district/

at 5:21 pm

Boy Records Kids Bullying Him, Gets Charged for It – Now His Parents Are …

Now His Parents Are Pursuing a Civil Lawsuit

By Neal Colgrass,  Newser Staff

(NEWSER) – A Pennsylvania high school student who recorded alleged bullying on an iPad was punished for his efforts—and now his parents are fighting back.

The 15-year-old boy, who has learning disabilities, recorded his tormenters in class after enduring regular bullying, his mother tells the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. South Fayette High School reacted by slapping the teen with detention and dragging him before a judge for violating wiretap laws. “The whole thing has been a horrible nightmare,” said the boy’s mother, Shea Love. “This whole ordeal has made my son miserable.”

http://nation.foxnews.com/2014/04/15/boy-records-kids-bullying-him-gets-charged-it-now-his-parents-are-pursuing-civil-lawsuit

at 5:21 pm

Talk to kids early about cyberbullying

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

DEAR DOCTOR K: My daughter will be starting middle school this year. How can I protect her from cyberbullying?

DEAR READER: Bullying can be particularly difficult during middle and high school, when popularity and peer acceptance feel like the most important parts of life. Adding technology to the mix makes it worse still.

Cyberbullying is not simply bullying that takes place through electronic means. There are two unique problems with bullying through text messages or social media. First, if the bully keeps quiet about it, the bullying can be invisible to others. Just your child and the bully know about it. And if your child has trouble talking to you about it, no one else will know — not teachers, school counselors or your child’s friends.

Second is the opposite problem made possible by modern technology: The bully can hurt your child by spreading false and hurtful stories very easily to large numbers of people, including most of your child’s classmates. Once something is out in cyberspace, it’s very hard to control it.

For these reasons, cyberbullying can be particularly damaging. It can lead to anxiety, depression, substance abuse — even suicide.

It’s not easy to prevent cyberbullying. Probably the most important thing parents can do is talk to their children about what they do, see and experience online. Start these conversations early — as soon as your child starts using the Internet or a cellphone.

Your child may not come to you if she experiences cyberbullying. For clues that it might be going on, watch for changes in behavior. Ask lots of questions if you notice this occurring.

If she does encounter any cyberbullying, report it. Some of it could be illegal and should be reported to the police. This includes threats or sexually explicit content.

Even if it’s not illegal, all cyberbullying should be called out. After years of neglect, the problem of school bullying is being taken increasingly seriously. Ask your school’s advice about who the best person to help would be. It may be a guidance counselor, or the parent of the bully.

There are two sides to cyberbullying, and you should also talk to your daughter about not becoming a cyberbully herself. Let her know that comments and posts, even offhand ones, can make people feel bad.

Tell her that bystanders also play an important role. Some kinds of bullying, particularly cyberbullying that involves widespread distribution of hurtful information, involve the actions of a group. Help your daughter understand that she will become part of the bullying if she passes on hurtful comments, or laughs at or talks about the victim. But if she refuses to participate, stands up to the bully and stands up for the victim, she can help make things better.

By being mindful of behaviors that indicate your daughter is bothered by something, and by gently inquiring, you may be able to detect bullying and work with your daughter to do something about it.

http://santamariatimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/5112de18-c45b-11e3-a0f2-0019bb2963f4.html

at 5:21 pm

Teen punished for recording alleged bullying to sue school district

Posted by in School

File: June 2006: An empty classroom in Jackson, MIss.AP

The attorney for a Pennsylvania teen convicted of disorderly conduct for videotaping his alleged tormentors harassing him at school says the boy’s family will pursue a civil suit against the school district while appealing the judge’s ruling.

Shea Love, the teen’s mother, told WXPI.com her son was bullied by fellow students at South Fayette High School and recorded the incident on his iPad. When school officials learned about the recording, they reportedly forced him to delete it.  

“They were calling him some really bad names, talking about pulling his pants down,” Love told the station in March. 

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported that Love’s 15-year-old son, who has been diagnosed with a comprehension delay disorder, ADHD, and an anxiety disorder, was found guilty of disorderly conduct and fined $25 plus court costs.

Love questioned why school officials decided to contact police to discuss a possible violation of wiretapping laws but refused to confront the students whose voices were allegedly captured on the iPad harassing her son, the newspaper reported. 

“The whole thing has been a horrible nightmare,” told the Tribune-Review. “This whole ordeal has made my son miserable.”

According to a transcript of a March 19 court hearing obtained by the newspaper, the teen said he made the seven-minute recording “because I always felt like it wasn’t me being heard.” He said classmates bullied him for several months.

“I wanted some help,” the boy was quoted as saying. “This wasn’t just a one-time thing. This always happens every day in that class.”

According to the hearing transcript, district officials forced him to erase the recording and punished him with detention. He was charged with disorderly conduct after police decided the case did not warrant a felony wiretapping charge. 

The teen’s attorney, who was not identified, told WXPI.com the family plans to appeal the ruling and file a civil suit against South Fayette School District.

School officials could not be reached by the Tribune-Review for comment.

Click here for more from WPXI.com.

Click here for more from the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/04/15/teen-punished-for-recording-alleged-bullying-to-sue-school-district/

at 5:21 pm

Alhambra High School Evacuated Due to Report of Gas Smell

Posted by in School

Dozens of students were taken to an athletic field at Alhambra High School Tuesday morning after a gas smell was reported on campus.

alhambra2

Emergency crews respond to gas smell reported at Alhambra High School on Tuesday, April 15, 2014. (Credit: KTLA)

The smell was believed to be coming from an office or classroom at the school located on 101 S. 2nd St. (map), according to Lt. Dan Rodriguez of the Alhambra Police Department.

All staff and students were taken to the track field while authorities worked to determine the source of the smell and whether it was safe to return to the classrooms, Rodriguez said.

Aerial video from Sky5 showed emergency vehicles parked in front of the school.

Initial sweeps of the campus did not find anything that would indicate a critical or hazardous situation, according to Alhambra police.

Fire crews and police were expected to make one more sweep of the campus before allowing students back in to the classroom.

No injuries were reported in the incident.

Check back for updates on this developing story.  

alhambra

Students were taken to an athletic field at Alhambra High School Tuesday morning. (Credit: KTLA)

http://ktla.com/2014/04/15/alhambra-high-school-evacuated-due-to-gas-smell/

at 5:21 pm

Police believe accused high school stabber threatened 2 classmates before spree

Posted by in School

April 10, 2014: A bouquet of flowers is taped to a stairway rail near the closed entrance to Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Pa. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Detectives believe a boy charged with stabbing 21 other students and a security guard at his Pittsburgh-area high school threatened two students by phone before the attack, according to a search warrant. Neither was one of the victims.

The warrant, obtained for the home of Alex Hribal hours after last Wednesday’s rampage, said two students received “threatening phone messages and completed calls” from someone believed to be Hribal.

It said the threat of violence contained an expletive.

District Attorney John Peck said the two male students who got the calls were not among those stabbed or slashed in the attack, which occurred minutes before the start of classes at Franklin Regional High School.

Neither Peck nor the warrant say when the calls were made. Murrsyville police Chief Thomas Seefeld previously said investigators were looking into a threatening phone call the night before the assaults.

“The caller is believed to be the actor because of the subsequent conduct of the actor coming to school and attacking numerous individuals,” the warrant said.

Seefeld noted Monday that police had not definitively linked the calls to the 16-year-old suspect but were seeking phone records to determine if they came from a phone he could have used.

Defense attorney Patrick Thomassey did not return calls Monday from The Associated Press. But he told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, which first reported the contents of the search warrant: “I don’t know of those phone calls.”

He had previously told the AP that Hribal’s parents weren’t aware of any threatening calls the night before the attacks.

The warrant indicates detectives seized three video game systems and games, a wooden kitchen knife-holder, some notebook paper believed to contain Hribal’s handwriting and two computers.

Four students remained hospitalized Monday, three in critical condition. The fourth was upgraded to fair condition.

The high school’s teachers attended a counseling session at a nearby church before returning to the school for the first time Monday, part of a three-day effort by school officials and a hired crisis management team to fully reopen the school for classes Wednesday.

On Tuesday, students and parents will get a chance to see that hallways have been cleaned up and other steps taken to return the school to normal.

Some parents said their children are eager to get back to school.

“That’s where he wants to be, to be with his friends,” Jeff Mauro said of his son, Jamie, a ninth-grader who witnessed some of the stabbings. “This has been a learning experience that we have to love each other — all of us.”

Laura Thompson said her children “seem to think they’re going to be fine. But I think it’s going to be different when they’re back in that environment.”

Thomassey has said he plans to waive Hribal’s right to a preliminary hearing next week. After that, he said he would ask a judge to move the case to juvenile court, a move prosecutors are expected to contest. Thomassey said that request will be based largely on a mental health evaluation by a doctor he’s hired.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/04/15/police-believe-pa-high-school-stabber-threatened-2-classmates-before-spree/

at 11:21 am

Feds accused of ‘intimidation’ and ‘bullying’ ranchers

The standoff between Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and the federal government is symptomatic of Washington’s increased hostility towards ranchers, says a seasoned Wyoming environmental lawyer.

“The Cliven Bundy situation goes to show how American citizens react when a government has so expanded that it believe that the citizens are subservient to political power,” Karen Budd-Falen, a senior partner with Budd-Falen Law Offices L.L.C., told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

“In this case, the federal government claims that it had to remove grazing to protect a species — when in reality, livestock grazing has a miniscule impact (not even a bad impact) on the species,” said Budd-Falen, who has been representing property owners against federal encroachment for the past 20 years.

Last week, the standoff between Bundy and his supporters and the federal government ended when Bureau of Land Management agents determined removing Bundy’s 900 “trespass cattle” from federally protected desert tortoise habitat presented a serious public safety concern.

But Bundy may have been one of the lucky ones. A House Natural Resources Committee hearing last fall featured several ranchers who claim to have been bullied by the BLM while trying to make a living on federal lands.

Western ranchers often face-off against federal officials because they have to enter into deals with the government over water rights, grazing permits, endangered species protection and many more issues since about half of the lands are federally owned. This means that it’s easy for federal employees to make life hard for ranchers as environmental laws become increasingly more onerous and complex.

“Over the past 20 years in this county there is one thing that has become very apparent,” Idaho rancher Brenda Richards said before Congress last year. “Threats, bullying, and intimidation do not always present themselves in obvious ways or methods, but that does not make them any less damaging, any less wrong, nor does it have any less impact.”

Richards is also the Owyhee County Treasurer and says she has seen first hand how the BLM can negatively impact rural communities. Richards says the “longest running threat and intimidation within Owyhee County has been that that has come from the BLM neglecting to fulfill their obligations of renewing permits.”

Such actions hit ranchers and farmers hard, said Richards, adding that this” is at the expense of the county and the permittee as the BLM has the Federal Government to cover their attorney costs and time, which means it costs all taxpayers and those in our county twice.”

Wyoming Rancher Frank Robbins was also “bullied” by the BLM after he purchased a ranch in Hot Springs County, Wyoming in 1994. It turned out the BLM failed to properly document a “non-exclusive easement” they had been granted on the property — meaning Robbins had no idea he had bought land that the BLM had rights to.

When the BLM realized their easement was no longer valid, an agency employee contact Robbins and demanded he grant the BLM a new easement. The employee warned Robbins that if he didn’t comply, the agency would block access to his property. The BLM official said that the agency would get the land “one way or another.”

“Many ranchers have a problem with the BLM and [U.S. Forest Service],” rancher Wayne Hage told lawmakers last fall. “They have conducted themselves in a criminal manner and destroyed many ranchers. I personally have been at the receiving end of this criminal conduct.”

Over the past 23 years, Hage has taken the BLM and the Forest Service to court many times over federal agencies taking his property and his water rights. His father even had a criminal charge overturned by a court levied against him by the Forest Service for “cleaning out brush from a ditch with hand tools.”

“There is something very wrong when the government is only interested in power and land control over the rights of the citizens,” Budd-Falen told TheDCNF. “This is simply a case of the government putting a rancher out of business because the rancher has to prove a negative — the burden is on the rancher while all deference goes to the federal government and the government only has to make allegations to eliminate a family, a business, a community, a way of life.”

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http://dailycaller.com/2014/04/14/feds-accused-of-intimidation-and-bullying-ranchers/

at 11:21 am

Legal experts question prosecuting South Fayette student for recording bullies – Tribune

A South Fayette High School student convicted of disorderly conduct for attempting to record his bullies shouldn’t have been prosecuted, legal experts said on Monday.

“Disorderly conduct, in a practical sense these days, is a catch-all for disposing of a case,� said Downtown attorney Phil DiLucente, who is not involved with the case.

The charge of disorderly conduct includes harassing, annoying or alarming another person but often is used improperly, DiLucente said.

“What is alarming to me is the police’s limited knowledge of the law. They usually know procedure pretty good, but they really don’t know a lot about charges,â€� he said.

South Fayette police Lt. Frank Kurta charged sophomore Christian Stanfield, 15, with disorderly conduct on Feb. 12 when his mother confronted school administrators about students bullying her son on a seven-minute recording he took on his iPad one day earlier. The school’s principal, Scott Milburn, initially told police he believed he had a “wiretapping incident.â€�

Stanfield’s mother said he was diagnosed with a comprehension delay disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and an anxiety disorder. He told South Fayette District Judge Maureen McGraw-Desmet that he made the recording to show his mother the extent to which he was being bullied, according to a transcript of the March 19 hearing.

“I wanted her to understand what I went through,� he told the judge. “I really was having things like books slammed upside of my head.�

McGraw-Desmet did not return calls seeking comment. South Fayette police Capt. John Phoennik declined to comment.

South Fayette school Superintendent Bille P. Rondinelli said she could not discuss what happened.

“The district is precluded from discussing student matters,� she said.

Jim Jordan, an antibullying expert and author who speaks at schools around the world, said it appears that Stanfield’s mother, Shea Love, followed proper protocol for reporting her son’s bullying to the district.

Love, 40, an Air Force veteran, sent Christian’s teacher several emails about his complaints between October and February, according to testimony from the hearing.

“I would be curious to see if the school documented any investigation after the mother complained,â€� Jordan said. “It doesn’t seem like the district did anything, since it continued, and this boy was forced to stick up for himself by recording them and getting proof.â€�

Stanfield’s attorney, Jonathan D. Steele, said he anticipates winning an April 29 appeal of McGraw-Desmet’s ruling. He is considering filing a federal lawsuit against the district for not reacting to the bullying claims and for retaliating against his client.

“Districts have an obligation once they know about bullying,� he said.

Adam Brandolph is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach him at 412-391-0927 or abrandolph@tribweb.com.

http://triblive.com/news/allegheny/5945781-74/fayette-south-district

at 11:21 am

Jefferson Elementary Center takes on bullying – Scranton Times

JEFFERSON TWP. – When his 13-year-old sister described a peer hurting her feelings as bullying, 5-year-old Benjamin Fox corrected her.

“If it’s not repetitive and it’s not on purpose, it’s not bullying,” the kindergartner told his sister at dinner, his mother, Sarah Fox, recalled.

Jefferson Elementary Center this year implemented the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, an effort that began with instilling a schoolwide definition of the pattern of behavior that Benjamin took to heart.

The common definition is important because the program emphasizes teaching children how to solve their own conflicts if they do not escalate to real bullying – and to seek help from grown-ups when issues do rise to that level.

Each class in the school has been dedicating 30 to 42 minutes a week to the program that Principal Judith Castrogiovanni described as broader than just a bullying prevention program.

“It’s really about school climate,” Mrs. Castrogiovanni said. “It’s really about making a conscious decision to put time aside every school week to say, ‘This is how we treat each other.’ … If you do it well and you’re trying really hard to understand how to help one another and look out for one another, that’s going to be something that makes them better citizens for the rest of their school years, and also into the future.”

During a recent visit to Melissa Smith’s first-grade class during one of the weekly Olweus sessions, students sat in a circle on the floor. Several first-graders opened up and used words like “angry,” “nervous” and “sad” to describe how they felt when either the pupils themselves or one of their friends was mistreated.

Part of the lesson encouraged students to be assertive, and pupils proposed several ways to resolve conflicts. If a bully targets a friend, Johnny DiMattio suggested taking the friend’s hand and walking away.

First-grader Caroline Luyster recalled simply telling someone who was throwing mud onto the monkey bars to “stop it!”

“To be able to speak for yourself at this age is a real accomplishment,” Mrs. Castrogiovanni said.

Mrs. Smith said the most obvious way she can see the program affecting her students is that many of her pupils now go out of their way to ensure others are not excluded from games and activities.

Mrs. Castrogiovanni said teachers have told her about eight months into the program that students are figuring out more ways to settle minor conflicts than automatically looking for a teacher to act as a referee.

Superintendent Bryan McGraw envisions the program branching out to Moscow Elementary Center to cover all students in kindergarten through third grade.

Contact the writer: kwind@timesshamrock.com, @kwindTT on Twitter

http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/jefferson-elementary-center-takes-on-bullying-1.1668469

at 5:20 am

Bullying’s Terrible Legacy: How Childhood Stress Can Change Our Genes Forever

The memories of seventh grade have mostly receded from view for most of us.

How well can you recall the faces of your fellow students? Can you summon the names of the teachers, the secretary, and the principal? Can you hear the way the bell sounded? How about the smell of the cafeteria on sloppy-joe day? The ache of your first crush? The panic of finding yourself in the bathroom at the same time as the school bully?

Maybe it’s all strikingly clear. Or maybe, over time, your middle-school years have been lost in the fog of so many other childhood memories.

Either way, you’re carrying it all with you.

For a long time now, we’ve understood that we shoulder our experiences in the knapsack of our psyche. Even things you cannot consciously recall are somewhere in there, swimming around in your subliminal mind, ready to emerge unexpectedly for good or ill.

But it’s all much deeper than that, because your body is in a constant state of transformation and regeneration, and your experiences, no matter how seemingly inconsequential, from bullies to crushes to sloppy joes, have all left an indelible mark within you — and more importantly, within your genome.

In a single generation, genetic traits can change and be changed forever, as shown through the exciting world of epigenetics. Our genes actually change as a result of life conditions.

Until very recently, we’ve been thinking and speaking about the serious and long-term ramifications of bullying in predominantly psychological terms. Everyone agrees that bullying can leave very significant mental scars. The immense psychic pain some children and teens experience can even lead them to consider and act on desires to physically harm themselves.

But what if our experiences of being bullied did a lot more than just saddle us with some serious psychological baggage? Well, to answer that question, a group of researchers from the UK and Canada decided to study sets of monozygotic “identical” twins from the age of 5. Besides having identical DNA, each twin pair in the study had never been bullied up until that point.

You’ll be glad to know that these researchers were not allowed to traumatize their subjects, unlike how the Swiss mice were handled. Instead, they let other children do their scientific dirty work.

After patiently waiting for a few years, the scientists revisited only the twin pairs where one of the twins in the pair had been bullied. When they dropped back into the now-12-year-old twins’ lives, they found that present now was a striking epigenetic difference that had not been there when the children were 5. The researchers found significant change only in the twin who had been bullied. This means, in no uncertain genetic terms, that bullying isn’t just risky in terms of self-harming tendencies for youth and adolescents; it actually changes how our genes work and how they shape our lives, and likely what we pass along to future generations.

What does that change look like genetically? Well, on average, in the bullied twin a gene that codes for a protein that helps move the neurotransmitter serotonin into neurons called SERT had significantly more DNA methylation in its promoter region. This change is thought to dial down the amount of proteins that can be made from the SERT gene — meaning the more it’s methylated, the more it’s “turned off.”

The reason that these findings are significant is that these epigenetic changes are thought to be able to persist throughout our lives. This means that even if you can’t remember the details of being bullied, your genes certainly do.

But that’s not all that these researchers found. They also wanted to see if there were any psychological changes between the twins to go along with the genetic ones that they’d observed. To test that, they subjected the twins to certain types of situational testing, which included public speaking and mental arithmetic — experiences that most of us find stressful and would rather avoid. They discovered that one of the twins, the one with a history of being bullied (with a corresponding epigenetic change), had a much lower cortisol response when exposed to those unpleasant situations. Bullying not only turned those children’s SERT gene to “low” but turned down their levels of cortisol when stressed.

A spike of cortisol can help us through a tough situation. But having too much cortisol for too long can short-circuit our physiology pretty quickly. So having a blunted cortisol response to stress was the twin’s epigenetic reaction to be being bullied. In other words, the twin’s epigenome changed in response in order to protect them from too much sustained cortisol. This compromise is a beneficial epigenetic adaptation in these children that helps them survive persistent bullying. The implications of this are nothing short of staggering.

Many of our genetic responses to our lives work in such a fashion, favoring the short term over the long term. Sure, it’s easier in the short term to dull our response to persistent stress, but in the long run, epigenetic changes that cause long-term blunted cortisol responses can cause serious psychiatric conditions such as depression and alcoholism. And not to scare you too much, but those epigenetic changes are likely heritable from one generation to the next.

In the meantime, given the tremendous amount we’ve learned about what inheritance really means and what we can do to impact our genetic legacy — in ways both good (spinach, perhaps) and bad (stress, it would appear) — you are far from helpless.

While it may not always be possible to break completely free from your genetic inheritance, the more you learn, the more you will come to understand that the choices you make can result in a big difference in this generation, the next one, and possibly everyone else down the line.

We’ve always known that our genes shape our lives. But we’re learning now that our lives shape our genes. This gives us one more reason to make sure that the early lives of our children are free of bullying and other unnecessary or potentially damaging stressors. By doing so, we may be helping not only our children but our ancestors for generations to come.

Need help? In the U.S., visit stopbullying.gov.

Sharon Moalem M.D., Ph.D., is an award-winning inventor, physician and scientist. He is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Survival of the Sickest and Inheritance: How Our Genes Change Our Lives — and Our Lives Change Our Genes.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sharon-moalem/bullyings-terrible-legacy_b_5142857.html

at 5:20 am

Teen Nation Tour delivers high-energy concert with anti-bullying message – The Grand Rapids Press

CEDAR SPRINGS, MI – More than 500 Cedar Springs Middle School students Monday, April 14, attended a high-energy concert by Teen Nation Tour with a clear message: Stand and Defend Against Bullying.

The six recording artists wowed the crowd with a mixture of popular pop and RB songs, while weaving in personal stories, tips and lessons about bullying.

“They picked common songs that kids liked to get us engaged before sharing their message,” said eighth-grader Mackenna Darling, 14, in a loud gymnasium. “I think it was great. This school does a lot to help with bullying with programs such as Be Nice and Rachel’s Challenge.

Teen Nation Tour is a year-long anti-bullying campaign and concert tour that is performing in 15 schools in nine Kent County school districts through April 22. The program kicked-off Monday morning before 560 students at Sparta Middle School before heading to Cedar Springs. TNT expects to to reach more than 10,000 students.

Related: Teen Nation Tour: Music-fueled anti-bullying program coming to nine school districts

“I liked like how they tied the message in with music and didn’t shove it down our throats,” said eighth-grader Brandon Owens, 13.

Co-headliners, 14-year-olds J. Ryan and Tristan Blaine, opened the show and hyped up the crowd with Drake’s “Hold On We’re Going Home.” Students were on their feet most of the show clapping, singing and dancing. The artists often went into the bleachers and occasionally, brought students to the floor to sing to them.

But students became silent when artists such as Blaine shared their experiences with being bullied and stories about others.

For example, Blaine spoke to the crowd about a National Guardsman’s 16-year-old daughter who hung herself in her closet. He told the students about how she endured relentless bullying from so-called friends, and her former boyfriend who called her “ugly, stupid and worthless.”

 

“We don’t want you to be bystanders, we want you to be upstanders,” said 16-year-old singer Faith Shirley, after a performance of Taylor Swift’s,”We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” in which she brought more than 50 boys down to the gym floor.

The artists would periodically ask the students what they were going to do against bullying, and they yelled to the top of their lungs, “stand and defend!”

“Stand and defend is about not sitting back and watching kids being bullied,” said seventh-grader Audrie Davis, about the message to say something or tell an adult about bullying.

“I thought it was really cool how they brought the audience into the show. It was really entertaining.”

The artists spoke of verbal and physical bullying as well as saying mean, hateful things via cyber bullying to others.

“We are all teens here and relate to these students well because we’re in the same age category and go through the same things they go through,” said J. Ryan, who was a former X-Factor contestant. “This is such an important and powerful message to spread.”

Sue Spahr, principal of Cedar Springs Middle School, said the tour aligns with the school’s efforts to reduce bullying over the last four years.

“We’ve just been working continuously to help students understand ways they can reach out in kindness and just enjoy diversity in the culture whatever that looks like,” she said. “This is just one more way to continue to keep the message alive and keep it at the forefront of their mind.”

After performing Akon’s “What You Got,’ Collin Kozola, 17, talked to the students about his struggles in school with bullying because he was considered different.

Lee Wilson, launched Teen Nation Tour in 2012, motivated by the bullying of his son, who was beaten on a school bus in 2009. He said students connect better with the teenage artists than adults on the subject.

“After these kids leave a school, they get hundreds and hundreds of messages from students about how to handle a certain situation or what to do about friend being bullied,” he said, about the artists gave out their Twitter addresses.

Based in San Antonio, TX, the tour travels to schools across the country. The tour is done in partnership with UNITE Media Group, headquartered in Troy, MI. Kent Intermediate School District coordinated the tour for the districts.

Other participating districts include: Wyoming, Kentwood, Godwin Heights, Rockford, Byron Center, Kenowa Hills, and Northview.

The Teen Nation Tour will be at the remaining schools:

• Tuesday, April 15, Wyoming Intermediate School and Wyoming Junior High School.

• Wednesday, April 16, TNT performs for Northview’s Highlands and Crossroads middle school students. A 7 p.m. community performance is planned at the Performing Arts Center, located in Northview High School, 4451 Hunsberger Ave. NE.

• Thursday, April 17, Godwin Heights Middle School and North Rockford Middle School.

• Friday, April 18, Kentwood’s Crestwood and Valleywood middle schools.

• Monday, April 21, Kentwood’s Pinewood Middle Schools and Byron Center West Middle School.

• Tuesday, April 22, Kenowa Hills Middle and High Schools.

Monica Scott is the Grand Rapids K-12 education writer. Email her at mscott2@mlive.com and follow her on Twitter @MScottGR or Facebook

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2014/04/teen_nation_tour_delivers_high.html

at 5:20 am

Judge Orders Man to Hold Bullying Sign After Taunting Disabled Kids

An Ohio judge didn’t let an alleged bully off easy. She ordered a man to stand on a street corner on Sunday for five hours — while holding a sign that says, “I am a bully.”

bully-guy-sign

Edmond Aviv was ordered to sit on a street corner with a sign that reads, “I am a bully.” (Credit: WKYC via CNN)

It’s one part of 62-year-old Edmond Aviv’s punishment for harassing his neighbor Mike Prugh and his disabled children.

According to court documents, the pair have been feuding for 15 years and appeared in court five times.

Prugh told CNN affiliate WKYC in South Euclid that Aviv has smeared dog feces on his house, hooked up a device that leaked kerosene and harassed his adopted African-American siblings with disabilities.

In addition to the sign, Judge Gayle Williams-Byers sentenced Aviv to 15 days in jail and ordered him to write a letter of apology to the family, take anger management classes and complete 100 hours of community service.

 

 

http://ktla.com/2014/04/14/judge-orders-man-to-hold-bullying-sigh-after-taunting-disabled-kids/

at 5:20 am

Teen Nation Tour delivers high-energy concert with anti-bullying message – The Grand Rapids Press

Posted by in Uncategorized

CEDAR SPRINGS, MI – More than 500 Cedar Springs Middle School students Monday, April 14, attended a high-energy concert by Teen Nation Tour with a clear message: Stand and Defend Against Bullying.

The six recording artists wowed the crowd with a mixture of popular pop and RB songs, while weaving in personal stories, tips and lessons about bullying.

“They picked common songs that kids liked to get us engaged before sharing their message,” said eighth-grader Mackenna Darling, 14, in a loud gymnasium. “I think it was great. This school does a lot to help with bullying with programs such as Be Nice and Rachel’s Challenge.

Teen Nation Tour is a year-long anti-bullying campaign and concert tour that is performing in 15 schools in nine Kent County school districts through April 22. The program kicked-off Monday morning before 560 students at Sparta Middle School before heading to Cedar Springs. TNT expects to to reach more than 10,000 students.

Related: Teen Nation Tour: Music-fueled anti-bullying program coming to nine school districts

“I liked like how they tied the message in with music and didn’t shove it down our throats,” said eighth-grader Brandon Owens, 13.

Co-headliners, 14-year-olds J. Ryan and Tristan Blaine, opened the show and hyped up the crowd with Drake’s “Hold On We’re Going Home.” Students were on their feet most of the show clapping, singing and dancing. The artists often went into the bleachers and occasionally, brought students to the floor to sing to them.

But students became silent when artists such as Blaine shared their experiences with being bullied and stories about others.

For example, Blaine spoke to the crowd about a National Guardsman’s 16-year-old daughter who hung herself in her closet. He told the students about how she endured relentless bullying from so-called friends, and her former boyfriend who called her “ugly, stupid and worthless.”

 

“We don’t want you to be bystanders, we want you to be upstanders,” said 16-year-old singer Faith Shirley, after a performance of Taylor Swift’s,”We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” in which she brought more than 50 boys down to the gym floor.

The artists would periodically ask the students what they were going to do against bullying, and they yelled to the top of their lungs, “stand and defend!”

“Stand and defend is about not sitting back and watching kids being bullied,” said seventh-grader Audrie Davis, about the message to say something or tell an adult about bullying.

“I thought it was really cool how they brought the audience into the show. It was really entertaining.”

The artists spoke of verbal and physical bullying as well as saying mean, hateful things via cyber bullying to others.

“We are all teens here and relate to these students well because we’re in the same age category and go through the same things they go through,” said J. Ryan, who was a former X-Factor contestant. “This is such an important and powerful message to spread.”

Sue Spahr, principal of Cedar Springs Middle School, said the tour aligns with the school’s efforts to reduce bullying over the last four years.

“We’ve just been working continuously to help students understand ways they can reach out in kindness and just enjoy diversity in the culture whatever that looks like,” she said. “This is just one more way to continue to keep the message alive and keep it at the forefront of their mind.”

After performing Akon’s “What You Got,’ Collin Kozola, 17, talked to the students about his struggles in school with bullying because he was considered different.

Lee Wilson, launched Teen Nation Tour in 2012, motivated by the bullying of his son, who was beaten on a school bus in 2009. He said students connect better with the teenage artists than adults on the subject.

“After these kids leave a school, they get hundreds and hundreds of messages from students about how to handle a certain situation or what to do about friend being bullied,” he said, about the artists gave out their Twitter addresses.

Based in San Antonio, TX, the tour travels to schools across the country. The tour is done in partnership with UNITE Media Group, headquartered in Troy, MI. Kent Intermediate School District coordinated the tour for the districts.

Other participating districts include: Wyoming, Kentwood, Godwin Heights, Rockford, Byron Center, Kenowa Hills, and Northview.

The Teen Nation Tour will be at the remaining schools:

• Tuesday, April 15, Wyoming Intermediate School and Wyoming Junior High School.

• Wednesday, April 16, TNT performs for Northview’s Highlands and Crossroads middle school students. A 7 p.m. community performance is planned at the Performing Arts Center, located in Northview High School, 4451 Hunsberger Ave. NE.

• Thursday, April 17, Godwin Heights Middle School and North Rockford Middle School.

• Friday, April 18, Kentwood’s Crestwood and Valleywood middle schools.

• Monday, April 21, Kentwood’s Pinewood Middle Schools and Byron Center West Middle School.

• Tuesday, April 22, Kenowa Hills Middle and High Schools.

Monica Scott is the Grand Rapids K-12 education writer. Email her at mscott2@mlive.com and follow her on Twitter @MScottGR or Facebook

at 5:20 am

Teen Nation Tour delivers high-energy concert with anti-bullying message – The Grand Rapids Press

CEDAR SPRINGS, MI – More than 500 Cedar Springs Middle School students Monday, April 14, attended a high-energy concert by Teen Nation Tour with a clear message: Stand and Defend Against Bullying.

The six recording artists wowed the crowd with a mixture of popular pop and RB songs, while weaving in personal stories, tips and lessons about bullying.

“They picked common songs that kids liked to get us engaged before sharing their message,” said eighth-grader Mackenna Darling, 14, in a loud gymnasium. “I think it was great. This school does a lot to help with bullying with programs such as Be Nice and Rachel’s Challenge.

Teen Nation Tour is a year-long anti-bullying campaign and concert tour that is performing in 15 schools in nine Kent County school districts through April 22. The program kicked-off Monday morning before 560 students at Sparta Middle School before heading to Cedar Springs. TNT expects to to reach more than 10,000 students.

Related: Teen Nation Tour: Music-fueled anti-bullying program coming to nine school districts

“I liked like how they tied the message in with music and didn’t shove it down our throats,” said eighth-grader Brandon Owens, 13.

Co-headliners, 14-year-olds J. Ryan and Tristan Blaine, opened the show and hyped up the crowd with Drake’s “Hold On We’re Going Home.” Students were on their feet most of the show clapping, singing and dancing. The artists often went into the bleachers and occasionally, brought students to the floor to sing to them.

But students became silent when artists such as Blaine shared their experiences with being bullied and stories about others.

For example, Blaine spoke to the crowd about a National Guardsman’s 16-year-old daughter who hung herself in her closet. He told the students about how she endured relentless bullying from so-called friends, and her former boyfriend who called her “ugly, stupid and worthless.”

 

“We don’t want you to be bystanders, we want you to be upstanders,” said 16-year-old singer Faith Shirley, after a performance of Taylor Swift’s,”We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” in which she brought more than 50 boys down to the gym floor.

The artists would periodically ask the students what they were going to do against bullying, and they yelled to the top of their lungs, “stand and defend!”

“Stand and defend is about not sitting back and watching kids being bullied,” said seventh-grader Audrie Davis, about the message to say something or tell an adult about bullying.

“I thought it was really cool how they brought the audience into the show. It was really entertaining.”

The artists spoke of verbal and physical bullying as well as saying mean, hateful things via cyber bullying to others.

“We are all teens here and relate to these students well because we’re in the same age category and go through the same things they go through,” said J. Ryan, who was a former X-Factor contestant. “This is such an important and powerful message to spread.”

Sue Spahr, principal of Cedar Springs Middle School, said the tour aligns with the school’s efforts to reduce bullying over the last four years.

“We’ve just been working continuously to help students understand ways they can reach out in kindness and just enjoy diversity in the culture whatever that looks like,” she said. “This is just one more way to continue to keep the message alive and keep it at the forefront of their mind.”

After performing Akon’s “What You Got,’ Collin Kozola, 17, talked to the students about his struggles in school with bullying because he was considered different.

Lee Wilson, launched Teen Nation Tour in 2012, motivated by the bullying of his son, who was beaten on a school bus in 2009. He said students connect better with the teenage artists than adults on the subject.

“After these kids leave a school, they get hundreds and hundreds of messages from students about how to handle a certain situation or what to do about friend being bullied,” he said, about the artists gave out their Twitter addresses.

Based in San Antonio, TX, the tour travels to schools across the country. The tour is done in partnership with UNITE Media Group, headquartered in Troy, MI. Kent Intermediate School District coordinated the tour for the districts.

Other participating districts include: Wyoming, Kentwood, Godwin Heights, Rockford, Byron Center, Kenowa Hills, and Northview.

The Teen Nation Tour will be at the remaining schools:

• Tuesday, April 15, Wyoming Intermediate School and Wyoming Junior High School.

• Wednesday, April 16, TNT performs for Northview’s Highlands and Crossroads middle school students. A 7 p.m. community performance is planned at the Performing Arts Center, located in Northview High School, 4451 Hunsberger Ave. NE.

• Thursday, April 17, Godwin Heights Middle School and North Rockford Middle School.

• Friday, April 18, Kentwood’s Crestwood and Valleywood middle schools.

• Monday, April 21, Kentwood’s Pinewood Middle Schools and Byron Center West Middle School.

• Tuesday, April 22, Kenowa Hills Middle and High Schools.

Monica Scott is the Grand Rapids K-12 education writer. Email her at mscott2@mlive.com and follow her on Twitter @MScottGR or Facebook

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2014/04/teen_nation_tour_delivers_high.html

at 5:20 am

Murrysville police not notified of alleged cyber-bullying in Franklin Regional …

Murrysville police contacted a Franklin Regional student and her family regarding alleged cyber-bullying against stabbing suspect Alex Hribal, not the other way around, the chief said.

Police Chief Thomas Seefeld said Monday he learned of the alleged postings Sunday while reading published news reports. Alicia Graham and her father told Pittsburgh Action News 4 Friday the screenshots of the posts against Hribal were forwarded to police following the stabbings at Franklin Regional High School April 9.

VIDEO: Watch Ashlie Hardway’s report

“Upon reading that article, I was a little surprised. As I stand here now, we have not received any information to that effect,” Seefeld said. “This morning, I had my detective contact Mr. Graham to discuss that with him. At the present time, he’s trying to gather that information and bring it to us.”

Police are also asking anyone with information about a motive in this case to come forward.

“The investigation is going to be lengthy. We encourage input from the public. If they have anything, bring it to us so we make it part of the investigation, so we can look at this from all angles. We’re willing to look at anything that’s brought forward,” Seefeld said.

Hribal’s attorney, Patrick Thomassey, has said there have been some accusations about possible bullying that have come to light, but he did not elaborate further. Hribal remains in the Westmoreland County Juvenile Detention Facility.

http://www.wtae.com/news/murrysville-police-not-notified-of-alleged-cyberbullying-in-franklin-regional-attack/25478900