November 1, 2014 at 7:40 am

School recognizes National Bullying Prevention Month

Students of Passaic County Technical Institute (PCTI) proudly expressed their admiration for football stars D. West (Florida Bobcats, AFL), Bobby Jackson (New York Jets, NFL), and Rashad Jennings ( New York Giants, NFL) when the three football players visited Bulldog Country to help motivate and impart important life lessons to all in attendance.

On Monday, Oct. 20, West and Jackson visited the high school as part of October’s National Bullying Prevention Month. Utilizing the power that comes with a good sense of humor, West spoke candidly with students about the importance of respecting others, as well as themselves. He also shared the heart-wrenching tale of growing up as a personal victim of bullying, and added that these events still affect him to this day. West’s “personal hero,” Jackson, rounded out the assembly. The duo underscored the personal responsibility of every single person to stop bullying in its tracks.

Rashad Jenning’s tactics were much more subtle. The Giants Running Back asked that Criminal Justice/Public Safety students think of him as a “big brother” and allowed his Tuesday, Oct. 21 visitation to act as a dialogue where students steered the conversation. Much of his time was spent touting the importance of preparedness and taking advantage of every presented opportunity. Rashad alluded that such advice played a significant a role in his personal success. He heeded that students follow the path of individuality and further learning. This, he stressed, would allow them to reach their greatest potential.

Both events presented impactful lessons to all in attendance. Warm thanks are extended to West, Jackson, and Jennings for taking the time to share their wisdom with the students of Passaic County Technical Institute.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/education/recognizing-bullying-prevention-month-1.1123437

at 7:40 am

Eradicating bullying in Maryland

Maryland has established a reputation for being a relatively diverse and tolerant state. This makes reports of incidents targeting Muslim students at public schools all the more alarming.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations recently asked the principal of Parkdale High School in Riverdale to investigate complaints that a teacher made inflammatory and false anti-Muslim comments to his class last month.

Students said the teacher told his English class, “Muslims are dangerous. They are terrorists and they will kill you.”

He is said to have then warned the students against being Muslim and allegedly said of Muslim students, “You guys did 9/11.” Asked about the allegations, the teacher said that the situation was a misunderstanding and that the discussion was blown out of proportion.

Can you imagine being told as a student that you are responsible for an act of terrorism simply because you share the same religion as the perpetrators of a crime? It’s outrageous and unacceptable that anyone — much less a student — should be made to feel guilty or ashamed for heinous acts committed by criminals who claim to share their faith.

That an educator — an individual who is entrusted daily by parents and other caregivers, school administrators and children to provide a safe and judgment-free learning environment for students — would allegedly make such an inflammatory, inaccurate and offensive allegation that has the very real potential to incite further backlash against Muslim students is even greater cause for concern. And such language itself is a form of bullying.

The sad irony that this happened in October, National Bullying Prevention Month, should not be lost on us. Unfortunately, many parents and children refuse to report incidents of bullying out of fear that they or their loved ones may be targeted, ostracized and further harassed.

Studies show that children who are bullied and harassed are more likely to harm themselves or others, commit or contemplate committing suicide, drop out of school, commit crimes and be unemployed.

When children are afraid or reluctant to go to school because of the cruel behavior of their teachers or peers, we have collectively failed in our responsibility to cultivate a safe learning environment for them. This failure manifests intellectually, physically, socially, emotionally and spiritually throughout these children’s lives. It may affect them on multiple levels, and it contributes to many of the ills that plague society today.

Investing in anti-bullying initiatives and taking a firm stand to champion a safe learning environment benefits children who are victimized and collectively benefits all of us.

As a lifelong Maryland resident and a civil rights activist, I know that I reside in a state that is at the forefront of championing anti-bullying initiatives and legislation.

In 2005, Maryland enacted the Safe Schools Reporting Act. This law requires the Maryland State Department of Education to require a county board of education to document and report all incidents of harassment or intimidation against students in public schools under the county board’s jurisdiction.

But although this legislation is a significant milestone in combating bullying in schools, it alone is not enough.

We must educate students, parents, educators and school administrators on the short-term and long-term consequences of bullying. Parents and caregivers must be trained to develop open lines of communication with children in their care so they feel comfortable discussing uncomfortable issues.

Resources and funding must be made available on state and local levels to support programs and initiatives designed to raise awareness and provide solutions. The establishment of a statewide anti-bullying task force can be instrumental in promoting a safe, respectful, tolerant and inclusive culture.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations offers free basic religious competency training to educators and school administrators. The training can help dispel myths and stereotypes about Islam and Muslims that often result in the bullying of students who are — or may be perceived to be — Muslim.

We have much work to do as individuals, as a community and as a society to eradicate bullying from our schools. If our goal is to work toward a better society, we must begin by investing in the future. Children represent that future. The steps we take today to nurture that future will determine the success, vitality and promise of tomorrow.

The writer is Maryland outreach manager for the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

Read more about this issue:

Kerry Kennedy: Changing school culture can end bullying

Robert Friedman: Our chance to stand up for bullied children

Ruth Marcus: Should we be criminalizing bullies?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/eradicating-bullying-in-maryland/2014/10/31/f5900570-5ebf-11e4-9f3a-7e28799e0549_story.html

at 7:40 am

Questions about bullying after Toppenish girl commits suicide

TOPPENISH, Wash. — A community’s in mourning after a 12-year-old Toppenish girl took her own life. She was a seventh-grader at Toppenish Middle School. While we don’t normally report on suicides, there are questions surrounding her death. An online obituary mentions bullying.

A community devastated. After losing one of its children.

Authorities confirmed to KIMA that Kamee Morago committed suicide. She died at home Wednesday.

An online obituary calls Kamee a straight-A, honor student who was involved in student government. She loved learning about her Native American heritage and was recently initiated a huckleberry picker — a big honor for such a young girl.

The light of so many lives, now lost.

But, that same obituary says this:

“Please be kind to each other and remember bullying has no place in the public school system or anywhere in our communities as far as that goes. Remember your actions can devastate people and you will have to live with your guilt.”

Toppenish police say they haven’t found any evidence Kamee was driven to take her life because of bullying. But, promised they’ll investigate any claims.

Toppenish School Superintendent John Cerna did not return KIMA’s call.

KIMA did hear from Wapato Longhouse religious leader, Harry Smiskin. He attended dressing services with the family. He says the family believes Kamee was bullied. Smiskin and Kamee’s parents plan to reach out to the school district.

KIMA also talked to a mom whose son was friends with Kamee — who shared classes and played basketball with her. She didn’t want to go on camera or give us her name. She said her son told her Kamee was bullied.

Questions with few answers, and a young girl gone too soon. A family left to live with her loss.

Funeral services for Kamee will be held on Saturday. When KIMA spoke with Toppenish Police Chief Adam Diaz , he told us the investigation is only in the initial stages.

http://www.kimatv.com/news/local/Questions-about-bullying-after-Toppenish-girl-commits-suicide-281148772.html

at 7:40 am

Student stabbed outside Houston’s Madison High School

Posted by in School

A stabbing occurred outside Madison High School Friday, the Houston Independent School District said.

http://www.khou.com/story/news/local/2014/10/31/stabbing-reported-at-madison-high-school/18254803/

at 7:40 am

With School Ban Nearing End, New York City Works on How and When to Allow …

Posted by in School

Log in to manage your products and services from The New York Times and the International New York Times.

Don’t have an account yet?
Create an account »

Subscribed through iTunes and need an NYTimes.com account?
Learn more »

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/01/nyregion/with-school-ban-nearing-end-new-york-city-works-on-how-and-when-to-allow-cellphones.html

at 7:39 am

3rd victim in Marysville school shooting dies

Posted by in School

SEATTLE — A 14-year-old girl who was critically injured after a student opened fire inside a Marysville high school cafeteria last week has died, raising the death toll in the shooting to four.

Shaylee Chuckulnaskit died Friday afternoon, a week after she was shot in the head, officials at Providence Regional Medical Center said.

“The entire Providence family is deeply saddened by this news and we extend our heartfelt sympathy to Shaylee’s family,” Dr. Anita Tsen of Providence said in a statement.

The Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed that Zoe Galasso, 14, was also killed in the Oct. 24 shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. Gia Soriano, 14, died Sunday from critical head injuries in the shooting.

The shooter, Jaylen Fryberg, died at the scene of a self-inflicted wound.

Two other students remain hospitalized. Andrew Fryberg, 15, is in critical condition in intensive care at Harborview Medical Center. Nate Hatch, 14, was upgraded to satisfactory condition after undergoing surgery Thursday to repair his jaw. Both are cousins of the shooter.

After a week off because of the shooting, students at Marysville-Pilchuck High School return to classes Monday. While a typical school day begins at 7 a.m., classes are scheduled to start at 10:30 a.m. instead. The school will have grief counselors available, said Aaron Toso, spokesman for the school district.

“Our hearts are broken at the passing of our beautiful daughter,” Shaylee Chuckulnaskit’s family said in a statement released by Providence officials. “Shay means everything to us. In Shay’s short life she has been a radiant light bringing us incredible joy and happiness. She has been a loving daughter, a caring sister, a devoted friend and a wonderful part of our community. We can’t imagine life without her.”

The family also thanked medics and hospital officials.

Newly released police radio traffic recordings from the shooting scene showed officers faced a daunting task as they responded to reports of a shooter. They learned they would have to secure a maze of buildings that make up the sprawling campus.

About a minute after 911 dispatchers reported at 10:39 a.m. Oct. 24 that they were receiving calls of a shooting in the Marysville-Pilchuck High School cafeteria, one officer got on the radio from inside and said: “It’s confirmed. We have a shooter. We have five down.”

A few seconds later he added, “The shooter is DOA. We’ve got apparently four” and then “the shooter is down. Two causalities.” Two minutes later: “I have two that are still breathing and alive. Looks like I have three possibly deceased.”

Jaylen Fryberg, a freshman, was quickly identified as the person who opened fire at his classmates before killing himself.

The recordings were sent to The Associated Press in response to a public records request.

Services for the shooter, Jaylen Fryberg, were held Thursday on the Tulalip Reservation.

A celebration of life for Zoe Galasso will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Word of Life Lutheran Brethren Church in Marysville.

An obituary for 14-year-old Gia Soriano said a memorial service for her would be held later.

Contributing: The Associated Press

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/10/31/14-year-old-dies-a-week-after-marysville-school-shooting/18281109/

at 1:40 am

Fairview anti-bullying campaign organizers hope to plant seeds of friendship …

Anti-bullying campaign

Anti-bullying campaign

Fairview student Calob Jones demonstrates a simple act of kindness by holding the door open for fellow student Sadie Wise.



Posted: Friday, October 31, 2014 4:06 pm

Fairview anti-bullying campaign organizers hope to plant seeds of friendship, kindness

By Loretta Gillespie
correspondent

cullmantimes.com

Children will surprise you sometimes. “We realize kids want to do good things — we just need to give them a vehicle — a way to make it happen,” said Fairview Guidance Counselor Kim Crumbley.

Crumbly speaks from the vantage point of being able to see the fruits of seeds planted two years ago when the school opted to take part in Rachael’s Challenge, an anti-bullying campaign named in honor of the first student killed in the 1999 Columbine High School massacre.

This year, the school took up the anti-bullying banner to carry on Rachael’s Legacy. “About three-fourths of the faculty and almost every student at Fairview has joined,” said Crumbley.

The groups split into smaller sections, each led by a faculty member. They meet once per month to decide what the theme will be for the upcoming month. In October they rallied around the “Just Say Hi” campaign, making it a point to say hello to everyone they met.

The students have also done such thoughtful things as parking in the back of the parking lot so that others could have closer parking spaces, paying for the drink or the meal of the person behind them in line, and holding doors for others.

One of the most effective initiatives has been noted by others in the community. “We’ve had grocery stores call and thank us for the way our kids have been noticed carrying out groceries for people,” said Crumbley.

Another effective tool of the anti-bulling program was for the high school students to “Mix It Up” at lunch. “They made it a point to sit with people outside their regular group,” said Crumbley.

The overall theme for the year is printed on their T-shirts. “If not me, then who? If not now, then when?” sums up the feeling that Rachael Scott’s legacy promotes among students all over the country. For Fairview High School, it has been an eye-opening experience.

Not only for the students, but for parents and other community leaders and members, Rachael’s Challenge has become a call to do the right thing in many ways. In September, the school held a community event, inviting anyone who wanted to participate to come and hear Rachael’s uncle from Colorado. At the event, students signed a pledge to continue the challenge at Fairview.

November’s challenge is “What Can These Hands Do For Others?” in which the students will find ways of helping others do a myriad of things, whatever their community, neighbors and friends they have yet to make.

Fairview teachers and counselors welcome any questions about getting a program like Rachael’s Challenge started in other schools or communities.

For more information, contact Guidance Counselor Kim Crumbley, Fairview High School, 841 Welcome Road, Cullman 35058; 256-796-9025.


We have sent a confirmation email to {* emailAddressData *}. Please check your email and click on the link to activate your account.

We’ve sent an email with instructions to create a new password. Your existing password has not been changed.


on

Friday, October 31, 2014 4:06 pm.

http://www.cullmantimes.com/news/fairview-anti-bullying-campaign-organizers-hope-to-plant-seeds-of/article_f67ee878-6141-11e4-bbe8-3b015efa8974.html

at 1:39 am

Seattle woman says she became anorexic due to bullying

SEATTLE — A local woman says she was slapped, taunted and bullied until she became anorexic, and it all happened when she attended a private middle school just for girls. 

The Seattle Girls’ School just settled a lawsuit with Olivia Ray, who hopes her story empowers other young girls to stand up to bullying.

Today, Ray is a healthy, happy Junior at the University of Washington, contemplating a future filled with promise. That’s a bright contrast to the nearly three years she spent at Seattle Girls’ School, where she says bullying was an almost daily event. 

“Oftentimes I remember waking up crying and I did not want to go to school,” she said.

Ray attended SGS from 2006 to early 2009.  On its Facebook page, SGS says its mission is, “to inspire and develop courageous leaders who think independently, work collaboratively, learn joyfully, and champion change.”

But Ray says during her two and a half years there she was slapped, called names, taunted and kicked. But she says being ostracized was the worst part, and she says the bullying ultimately led to anorexia. 

“And I remember thinking, I don’t want to live like this, this is awful,” Ray said.  

She said she told her teachers and administrators what was going on, but says she was, “kind of treated like a joke,” and that they would put her in a room with the bullies so they could talk it out. 

“They told me just to, ‘Man up and deal with it,’” she said.

After Ray’s parents pulled her from school they filed a lawsuit against SGS.  In September, SGS settled for $120,000.  In a statement to KOMO 4 News, Head of School Rafael del Castillo said the school, “would not comment on any details of the recent lawsuit.”  But added, “any portrayal of our school….as a place that tolerates bullying or harassment is wholly inaccurate.”  The statement goes on to say, ” at Seattle Girls’ School, we take the issue of relational aggression very seriously…physical or emotional harassment of any sort is unacceptable.”

“Their understanding of the issue is non-existent,” said attorney Jack Connelly, who represented the Rays. 

He says SGS hasn’t changed its policies and needs to start paying attention and get educated on the issue of bullying. 

“So it doesn’t lead to isolation in students, it doesn’t lead to suicides, it doesn’t lead to acting out and murders such as we’ve seen in Marysville,” Connelly said.

Ray is thankful the lawsuit is now behind her though she says it empowered her by giving her a voice and she hopes it will do the same for others. 

“I hope it will show kids that they have a voice and they have power to create change,” she said.

Ray adds she’s now hoping to be a role model for others and show that, “one person…really can make an impact if you just keep fighting.”

October is National Bullying Prevention month.

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Bullying-Settlement-281138612.html

at 1:39 am

Kenneth C. Mills: Road bullying: Unlike schools, frequent encounters

Chapel Hill

Nancy E. Oates: Fallen values

http://www.chapelhillnews.com/2014/10/31/4281416/kenneth-c-mills-road-bullying.html

October 31, 2014 at 7:39 pm

Anniversary of Jonathan Martin’s departure, Dolphins’ bullying scandal passes …

 DAVIE – Quietly and unceremoniously, the one-year anniversary of ex-Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin leaving the team and claiming he was bullied is passing.

 Martin stormed out of the team cafeteria on Oct. 28; the bullying allegation became public Oct. 31.

 This year’s team didn’t even realize it was in the midst of the one-year anniversary of a national scandal.

 “I haven’t really thought about it since March or April, whenever we got back,” quarterback Ryan Tannehill said in reference to the start of preseason workouts.

 “I wasn’t aware of that at all,” safety Jimmy Wilson said.

 “That’s dead,” wide receiver Mike Wallace said.

 Wallace is right.

 And that’s the point.

 One year later no one talks about the bullying scandal.

 Reminders of the scandal linger in things such as the team credo, which players wrote, and the weekly Credo Award, which goes to an offensive, defensive and special teams player who best exemplify the team’s mantra on and off the field. But the scandal itself is practically forgotten.

 The team is back to “normal,” whatever that means.

 One thing that shouldn’t be forgotten, however, is people lost jobs, reputations and livelihoods. Trainer Kevin O’Neill. Offensive line coach Jim Turner. Guard Richie Incognito.

 No judgments. I’m just sayin’…

 That’s not to be forgotten.

 The players, for the most part, are OK.

 “How it affected my boy Richie and other people was in different ways,” Wilson said.

 “But we were back to football. It is what it is. Everybody’s got a job.”

 In a way the one-year anniversary is a poignant reminder of what happened.

 In another way, however, when an anniversary of such a significant event passes without much notice, well, it probably means normalcy has returned.

 Again, whatever “normal” means.

 “It’s been back to normal,” Wallace said. “That’s dead, man. That’s a non-issue, man.

 “Honestly I forgot all about J-Martin, man. The whole thing, everything.

 “He’s in a new spot. Hopefully everything is going well for him. Everything got back to normal. We’re doing well here, so it is what it is — a dead issue.”

 Center/guard Sam Brenner, a key replacement last season who is now on the practice squad, thinks it’s a good thing the past is in the past.

 “I think it’s just a new year, a new start,” he said. “We took this year as it was. So things are definitely good. They’re going well right now.

 “We’ve just got to keep taking care of business out on the field and everybody stay happy.”

 Good luck on that last one.

 But his point is well-taken. And the message from the players is clear.

 The bullying scandal, while so near, is far in the past.

 “I think we’re just focused on our goal,” cornerback Jamar Taylor said. “The goal is try to get to a Super Bowl, try to get to the playoffs.

 “So that’s what we’re worried about right now. Last year was last year. We learned from it; we’ve moved on from it.”

Copyright © 2014, Sun Sentinel

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/miami-dolphins/sfl-anniversary-of-jonathan-martins-departure-dolphins-bullying-scandal-passes-without-notice-20141031-story.html

at 7:39 pm

Good Coaching and Its Effect on Bullying

October is National Bullying Prevention Month, when organizations and people around the country work to help raise awareness of bullying prevention through events, activities, outreach, and education. Bullying is a problem that plagues many of our youth across all different communities, and can manifest in the form of mental and emotional abuse as well as physical violence.

To combat bullying amongst children, adults need to help kids understand the basic values of respecting their peers and appreciating peoples’ differences. This needs to include proper guidance from parents and teachers, who are helping to build these young minds on a daily basis. However, one area that is often overlooked in the fight against bullying is coaching and youth sports.

A recent survey by Playworks, a national nonprofit that improves children’s learning and physical health by facilitating safe, active, inclusive play in low-income schools, demonstrates the impact good coaching can have on reducing the prevalence of bullying in schools. The study found that staff in schools with Playworks recess programs reported an 82 percent reduction in bullying incidents, as well as an 87 percent decrease in disruptive events taking place in the classroom.
Those are both pretty amazing statistics to me for a couple reasons. First, those findings tell me that Playworks’ intervention is yielding tangible results in reducing bullying in the schoolyard and making children more comfortable at school.

Second, it proves that techniques used on the playground can translate into the classroom. By translating behavior at recess to the classroom, Playworks’ model of organized “play” is doing more than just temporarily alleviating the problem. It is instead teaching children real values, which leads them toward becoming better citizens in school.

One of the core beliefs of the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation USA is that sports and positive coaching can benefit kids beyond the playing field, setting them on a path for success in life. That’s why the great work that we’re seeing with organizations like Playworks, as well as with programs like Up2Us’s Coach Across America program that trains quality coaches and places them in sport for development programs around the country, is so important. The statistics don’t lie — proper coaching and mentorship reduce bullying! Programs like those described above impact thousands of kids in the US, but with 6.5 million volunteer coaches across the country, we should be trying to train all coaches on how to successfully reduce bullying amongst their students. With the support of parents, teachers, coaches and schools we can together reduce the incidents of bullying taking place on the playground, in the classroom, and on sports fields because kids will embrace the value of inclusiveness.

So as National Bullying Prevention Month nears its close, we want this to just be the beginning of coordinated efforts and driving more awareness around this serious problem. Parents and teachers can’t do it alone, and where better to continue mentoring and teaching kids the value of inclusiveness then while they’re playing the games they love.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/edwin-moses/good-coaching-and-its-eff_b_6082610.html?utm_hp_ref=sports&ir=Sports

at 7:39 pm

Mayor joins anti-bullying panel

davis: All across the country…new initiatives to put a stop to bullying are taking shape. rob vaughn: Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski is at the forefront of a local campaign… between schools and government. WFMZ’s Jamie Stover has the story. reporter: It happens..every day. Everywhere…PODIUM pawlowski “Bullying isn’t just something that happens in our schools. It also occurs within our communities, at work.” zoey isa “Bullying is a very serious thing, especially cyber-bullying” how many of you see bullying on social media reporter: And it can happen…to anyone. “i was picked on for having autism.” podium pawlowski “i was bullied when i was in high school. You can be bullied and become mayor.” reporter: It can also be done by anyone. podium “i have been bullied. i have also been the bully.”MICHAEL aruanno/teacher “a lot of times students are bullying and they don’t even realize it,”REPORTER: Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski calls bullying an epidemic. An issue that requires the attention of leaders, teachers…and students alike. As part of Mayors Against Bullying and the national movement known as “The Bully Project”…Pawlowski along with Allentown City Councilwoman Cynthia Mota hosted this panel on bullying. One hundred students from five different city schools joined in on the talk to raise awareness. Student representatives shared their experiences..ZOEY isa “When i see bullying, it hurts my heart and i just want to help.” reporter: And their schools’ initiatives to end it… Some of those ideas included online forums for bullying victims… and surveys to get to the root of what causes teasing.. But one school took a different approach. pawlowski “One of the great ideas that came out was random of acts kindness at Raub Middle School.” reporter: Pawlowski says sharing those ideas is just the beginning. pawlowski “There’s a lot of things we have to work on, a lot of good things we heard today. and we are going to continue to put some of those into action,”REPORTER: Jamie Stover 69 News. rob vaughn:

http://www.wfmz.com/news/news-regional-lehighvalley/mayor-joins-antibullying-panel/29452778

at 1:39 pm

Globetrotter tells students to stand against bullying – Winston

South Fork Elementary students received a lesson on how to combat bullying from Harlem Globetrotter Jonathan “Hawk” Thomas on Tuesday, Oct. 21 as part of Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools’ slate of bullying awareness programs this month.

Harlem Globetrotter Jonathan “Hawk” Thomas speaks to students at South Fork Elementary School.

Harlem Globetrotter Jonathan “Hawk” Thomas speaks to students at South Fork Elementary School.

DSC_0190“I, myself, was bullied at a young age. So to have the opportunity to give back to those who may be going through the same situation and showing them how to deal with it and stop it in a positive way is great,” Thomas said.

He stressed the ABC’s of bullying prevention: Action, Bravery and Compassion. The first step encourages students to report acts of bullying. Thomas told students they should be brave enough to step in to make sure the bully understands that it’s not okay to bully people and compassionate enough to show the person being bullied that they care.

After the short lesson, Thomas displayed the b-ball dexterity that Harlem Globetrotters are known for. The Morehead City native graduated from N.C. State University and has been a Globetrotter for three years.

Thomas shows Kindergarten teacher Barry Hill how to execute a trick as First-grade teacher Becca Oliver and students Kalonji Patterson and Mackenzy Poli look on.

Thomas shows Kindergarten teacher Barry Hill how to execute a trick as First-grade teacher Becca Oliver and students Kalonji Patterson and Mackenzy Poli look on.

He said coupling a serious topic like bullying with some of his basketball tricks puts his audience at ease.

“With kids, you always want to show them the fun side of things. That’s what they’re going to respond to, so you want to loosen them up and make sure they are not nervous because you want them to participate,” Thomas said. “Bullying is a very serious topic. As long as they are loosened up, they will be able to pay attention more and hone in on the topic.”

Guidance Counselor Ann Williams said someone from the Globetrotters contacted her and offered to provide a player to talk to students.

Kindergarten teacher Barry HIll shows off his moves.

Kindergarten teacher Barry HIll shows off his moves.

Williams

Williams

“We are putting emphasis on the importance of staying away and standing up for bullying,” she said. “Bullying is a very important issue because a lot of children are being bullied and are being hurt by it. We want to keep it at the forefront so children will know how to handle themselves and what they can do about it if they are bullied.”

Earlier in the month, the school was among several that held a UNITY walk to bring awareness to bullying. There have been other efforts as well.

 Kalonji Patterson, 7,  displays his talents.

Kalonji Patterson, 7, displays his talents.

“We have been going in the classrooms to teach lessons on bullying; talking to parents about how they can help their children if they are being bullied; and (we have) a school-wide pledge, where students signed a banner saying that they will not be or stand for bullying,” Williams said.
Thomas said the ultimate goal is to make sure students know that bullying is not OK.

“Even if they don’t understand the concept, it is very important that they know how to deal with bullies. Even if it’s not action, bravery and compassion, being able to stand up, tell teachers, not being afraid to tell on a bully is very important,” he said.

The Harlem Globetrotters will be at the Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum on March 21, 2015 at 7 p.m. For more information about the show visit www.ljvm.com.

For more information about the ABC’s of bullying, visit www.harlemglobetrotters.com/ambassadors-of-goodwill/abcs-of-bullying-prevention.

http://wschronicle.com/2014/10/globetrotter-tells-students-to-stand-against-bullying/

at 1:39 pm

Chicopee anti-bullying effort at Streiber School helps children make friends – The Republican

CHICOPEE — Children at Hugh Scott Strieber School never have to be alone again – all they have to do is sit on one of the benches set up between the playground and the playing field and other students will come join them.

“Sometimes if you get bullied by students you feel sad and left out. Now you can always make a friend,” said Alison Wegrzyn, 10, a fifth-grader.

Last year the Student Council at the elementary school was challenged to find a way to improve the school. The children came up with a list of ideas and agreed their favorite was to install a “buddy bench” in the play area outside, said Amiee Baron, the computer assistant and one of the advisors for the Student Council. Lauren Krok, the academic support specialist, is the other.

The bench is a really just a bench painted in the Streiber blue-and-white colors with “Buddy Bench” etched on the back. But the meaning is far more.

When children sit on it, it is a signal they need a friend, said Cameron Ranck, 10, a fifth grader.

“Anyone can go over and ask them if they want to play,” he said.

In other cases the child is just upset and needs someone to sit with and talk, Ranck said.

There are new children to the school who are shy and this gives them an easy way to make a new friend, said Anastasia Fitzgerald, 10, a fifth-grader.

“If a kid has a good friend and that friend is not there that day sometimes they don’t have anyone to play with,” she said.

Since the bench was installed Oct. 2, children said they have seen schoolmates sit on it. If they are outside in the playground they make a point to go over and ask them to join in on a game or sit down and talk.

“I go over and I tell them is there is anything I can do to let me know,” Fitzgerald said.

Once the children agreed on the project they wanted to tackle, they approached the School Council, which is made up of teachers, parents and a student, and presented the group with their idea, Baron said.

That followed with a second presentation to the Parent Teacher Organization and the start of a fundraising initiative to raise the estimated $1,000 needed to purchase a bench, Baron said.

Children had bake sales, they manned a booth at the Kielbasa Festival in the spring and had a variety of other fundraisers. They worked so hard and, with the help School Maintenance Director Ronald Simard, who found them the best price, the children were able to purchase two benches, Baron said.

This fall, a year after their effort began, the school officially unveiled their latest effort against bullying. Teachers even invited members of the Student Council who worked on the effort last year but graduated to the sixth grade and middle school, she said.

“It sends a really positive message out to the school,” Principal January Wilson said.
In some cases children are just shy and don’t know how to ask others if they can play with them. This solves the problem of children just standing alone in the playground when they really want to join in a game, she said.

The school had an official ceremony to unveil the bench, inviting Superintendent Richard W. Rege Jr., Mayor Richard J. Kos and others to join in the celebration.

“We made a big deal out of it. We wanted to know how proud we were of the kids,” Wilson said.


http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2014/10/chicopee_anti-bullying_effort.html

at 1:39 pm

Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski joins school effort to stop bullying


ALLENTOWN, Pa. –

Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski is partnering up with local students in a campaign to stop bullying.

On Thursday, the mayor and Allentown City Councilwoman Cynthia Mota hosted a forum to discuss the issue.

About 100 students from five area schools attended the discussion.

Thursday’s talk was part of Pawlowski’s involvement with national campaign “The Bully Project” and ” The Mayors Campaign to End Bullying.”

It also fell on one of the final days of “National Bullying Prevention Month.”

Pawlowski called bullying an epidemic and a problem that desperately needs to be addressed by leaders, students, teachers, and parents.

“Together, with the Mayor’s Office and area school leadership, community stakeholders, youth, everyone, we can change the culture in our schools,” Pawlowski said. “I think everyone in our community has a role in ending bullying.”

Students from each of the five schools shared their experiences with bullying.

“When I see bullying, it hurts my heart and I just want to help,” said Zoey Isa, a student at Roberto Clemente Charter School.

Pawlowski told students that he was also a victim of teasing.

“I was bullied when I was in high school. You can be bullied and become mayor,” Pawlowski said.

Much of the hour-long discussion focused on cyber bullying.

When asked if they had witnessed online bullying, nearly everyone inside the council chambers for Thursday’s discussion raised their hand.

“Bullying is a very serious thing, especially cyber-bullying,” Isa said.

Student representatives also announced their school’s initiatives to end bullying in school.

Pawlowski said he plans on taking those ideas to council.

“There’s a lot of things we have to work on, a lot of good things we heard today and we are going to continue to put some of those into action,” Pawlowski said.

http://www.wfmz.com/news/news-regional-lehighvalley/allentown-mayor-ed-pawlowski-joins-school-effort-to-stop-bullying/29452354

at 7:39 am

South Richmond High school students view play for National Bullying … – Staten Island Advance

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Students from South Richmond High School, along with teens from the Staten Island Mental Health Society’s Day Treatment Theraputic Program, wrapped up National Bullying Awareness and Prevention Month Thursday by viewing a play about the subject.

The production, titled “What Goes Around,” addressed social attitudes about violence, gender and sexual orientation; sexual harassment; racial harassment; diversity; verbal abuse; cyber-bullying; family violence; stereotypes and substance abuse, as performed by teens and professional actors from Illuminart Productions.

A question-and-answer session took place after the presentation.

About 80 teens attended the session, in the auditorium of the high school. South Richmond High School is located on the campus of Mount Loretto in Pleasant Plains.

“Since October is National Bullying Awareness and Prevention Month we wanted to do something to get students to think seriously about the problem and educate themselves on the many forms bullying can take,” explained Zabrina Stokes, assistant director of the SIMHS Day Treatment program. South Richmond High School works collaboratively with the program, she said.

The school collaborates with the Staten Island Mental Health Society

http://www.silive.com/southshore/index.ssf/2014/10/south_richmond_high_school_stu.html

at 7:39 am

South Richmond High school students view play for National Bullying … – Staten Island Advance

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Students from South Richmond High School, along with teens from the Staten Island Mental Health Society’s Day Treatment Theraputic Program, wrapped up National Bullying Awareness and Prevention Month Thursday by viewing a play about the subject.

The production, titled “What Goes Around,” addressed social attitudes about violence, gender and sexual orientation; sexual harassment; racial harassment; diversity; verbal abuse; cyber-bullying; family violence; stereotypes and substance abuse, as performed by teens and professional actors from Illuminart Productions.

A question-and-answer session took place after the presentation.

About 80 teens attended the session, in the auditorium of the high school. South Richmond High School is located on the campus of Mount Loretto in Pleasant Plains.

“Since October is National Bullying Awareness and Prevention Month we wanted to do something to get students to think seriously about the problem and educate themselves on the many forms bullying can take,” explained Zabrina Stokes, assistant director of the SIMHS Day Treatment program. South Richmond High School works collaboratively with the program, she said.

The school collaborates with the Staten Island Mental Health Society

http://www.silive.com/southshore/index.ssf/2014/10/south_richmond_high_school_stu.html

at 7:39 am

Kaukauna students act in anti-bullying movies

KAUKAUNA – Some Kaukauna students are teaching their peers a lesson about bullying and they’re doing so by using the power of the silver screen.

Thursday River View Middle School unveiled two films, “Be the Change” and “Making the Difference.” Student actors show bullying, from the perspective of victims, bullies, and bystanders.

Kaukauna school students say they see bullying happen.

“Every once in awhile I’ll see people get made fun of because of the clothes they wear, or their height or weight,” said freshman Griffin Klein.

Some told us it’s difficult to see their peers in that situation, but so is stepping in.

“It’s also hard to say something because it’s hard to speak out against your fellow classmates,” explained freshman Jason Van Zeeland.

River View Principal Dan Joseph told FOX 11 he understands it’s not easy for kids to always do the right thing. So the school is taking steps to change that, one step was making these movies

The school shared the films with students and parents Thursday.

“Help students understand their role and the importance that they play in building a positive school culture,” Joseph explained, saying, “it’s so much more powerful when it’s from peers, kids learning from each other.”

Klein played a bullying victim.

“It makes you feel worse about people who do get bullied. They don’t deserve to be bullied,” he said of the experience.

Nick Bauar played a bully.

“I felt really bad when I watched it the first time, just seeing how I had to act. It’s not nice at all,” said Bauar.

The actors told us their experience made them realize how hurtful bullying can be.

Bauar said he hope other students can learn from the movies too..

“Look through the other person’s point of view and think if you were the person being bullied,” he explained.

Klein told us it sounds like some students already have.

“A lot of people came up and said it was really inspirational for them,” he said.

The school also created a peer mentor group to discourage bullying.

http://fox11online.com/2014/10/30/kaukauna-students-act-in-anti-bullying-movies/

at 7:39 am

Kaukauna students act in anti-bullying movies

KAUKAUNA – Some Kaukauna students are teaching their peers a lesson about bullying and they’re doing so by using the power of the silver screen.

Thursday River View Middle School unveiled two films, “Be the Change” and “Making the Difference.” Student actors show bullying, from the perspective of victims, bullies, and bystanders.

Kaukauna school students say they see bullying happen.

“Every once in awhile I’ll see people get made fun of because of the clothes they wear, or their height or weight,” said freshman Griffin Klein.

Some told us it’s difficult to see their peers in that situation, but so is stepping in.

“It’s also hard to say something because it’s hard to speak out against your fellow classmates,” explained freshman Jason Van Zeeland.

River View Principal Dan Joseph told FOX 11 he understands it’s not easy for kids to always do the right thing. So the school is taking steps to change that, one step was making these movies

The school shared the films with students and parents Thursday.

“Help students understand their role and the importance that they play in building a positive school culture,” Joseph explained, saying, “it’s so much more powerful when it’s from peers, kids learning from each other.”

Klein played a bullying victim.

“It makes you feel worse about people who do get bullied. They don’t deserve to be bullied,” he said of the experience.

Nick Bauar played a bully.

“I felt really bad when I watched it the first time, just seeing how I had to act. It’s not nice at all,” said Bauar.

The actors told us their experience made them realize how hurtful bullying can be.

Bauar said he hope other students can learn from the movies too..

“Look through the other person’s point of view and think if you were the person being bullied,” he explained.

Klein told us it sounds like some students already have.

“A lot of people came up and said it was really inspirational for them,” he said.

The school also created a peer mentor group to discourage bullying.

http://fox11online.com/2014/10/30/kaukauna-students-act-in-anti-bullying-movies/

at 7:39 am

Auburn principal still working after teachers sue for bullying

AUBURN, Wash. — Six former Auburn school teachers are shocked that their old boss is still working after they sued him for bullying and sexual discrimination.

“It was a psychological prison,” Laurie Sison said.

Sison wanted to be a teacher when she was only six years old, but her position at Olympic Middle School wasn’t the dream job she’d hoped for.

“I taught everyday with my heart,” she remembered.

Soon after starting, Sison says, the verbal abuse from principal Jason Hill began, prompting her to take extreme measures to avoid him.

“I went and parked in the back of the building and I hid,” she said. “That became my norm.”

In a lawsuit Sison filed with five other teachers against Hill, they claim “intimidation, harassment and bullying” based on sexual discrimination.

“I’d get ready for work and I’d start throwing up,” Kim Detwiler said. “Five years of hell. It was hell!”

The women describe regularly “crying and shaking,” often “blocked into classrooms and offices.” One even reports, “I really thought he was going to hit me.”

“I hated going to work,” Debra Landis said.

The school district settled out of court for $450,000, but according to Superintendent Kip Herren, their insurance paid the money only to avoid even costlier litigation. Herren says both internal and external investigators found no evidence of bullying.

“The district remains committed to a safe and productive work environment for all its employees and takes allegations of bullying and harassment very seriously,” Herren said. “We are pleased to move forward, directing our energies and resources for the success of our students.”

Herren believes Hill is still qualified to remain the school’s principal.

The women say they never witnessed the same treatment of men. They believe Hill targeted his “verbally abusive behavior towards female employees,” according to the lawsuit.

So much so, that one of the teachers named in the lawsuit finally said, “I couldn’t do it anymore,” and after attempting suicide, “I spent 4 days in the ICU. I went to counseling.”

“Crumbling, going into the ground, because he’d be yelling at me and belittling me,” said Michele Morris.

All of the women left Olympic Middle School and now have new jobs. Many still have nightmares, including Sison, even though she finally feels safe at work.

“But my life is forever changed,” she said.

http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/2014/10/31/auburn-teachers-sue-principal-sexual-discrimination-bullying-olympic-middle/18224805/