September 2, 2014 at 12:57 am

Bullying prevention classes in Tucson scheduled this September

 For our DIRECTV subscribers: We apologize for the inconvenience of losing KOLD 13 from your channel lineup, but we want to assure you that our parent company, Raycom Media, is continuing to negotiate with DIRECTV to reach an equitable agreement for the programming they charge you to carry.

http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com/story/26417164/bullying-prevention-classes-in-tucson-scheduled-this-september

at 12:57 am

Northern Iowa district criticized over bullying complaints

LAKE MILLS, Iowa (AP) — Some parents are dissatisfied with how a northern Iowa school district is handling complaints about bullying and harassment.

Louise Martinson told the Mason City Globe Gazette that her middle school-age daughter has been bullied the past three years. Martinson says she’s gotten no calls back from the district and says her complaints are not being addressed by the Lake Mills district. She also says several other parents have reported similar problems.

District administrators say they’re taking complaints about bullying and harassment seriously and are aware of the parents’ concerns.

District equity coordinator Kari Wagner says that because the district can’t speak publicly about individual cases, there’s often a perception that nothing has been done. She says that perception isn’t accurate or fair.

http://www.kcrg.com/subject/news/education/northern-iowa-district-criticized-over-bullying-complaints-20140901

at 12:57 am

Mexico President Proposes Bill For Bullying, Underage Migrants

MEXICO CITY—Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto said he would present to Congress Monday proposals for a new law to protect children and adolescents, including measures to curb a growing problem of bullying in schools and actions to protect unaccompanied underage migrants.

Speaking at an event in which his government outlined programs aimed at eradicating child labor, Mr. Peña Nieto said he would for the first time submit the…

http://online.wsj.com/articles/mexico-president-proposes-bill-for-bullying-underage-migrants-1409606681

September 1, 2014 at 6:57 pm

Maize students foster friendship, combat bullying with new Buddy Bench

Sometimes at recess, as in life, you just need a buddy.

Last year, a group of students at Vermillion Elementary School in Maize petitioned their school counselor to form a Buddy Club as a way to reduce bullying and foster friendships.

This year, thanks to a grant from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the school has a Buddy Bench on one side of its playground, a place where any student feeling lonely, bullied or left out can retreat to find a friend.

“If they’re feeling lonely or maybe they’re new to the school, they can sit on it, and maybe he or she could make new friends,” said third-grader Alexis Gromala, one of the founders of the Buddy Club.

“I heard there was too much bullying going on around the world,” said Eli Blankinship, 8. “So I just decided to start the Buddy Club. And then I was like, ‘Why didn’t I start this earlier?’ ”

Buddy Benches at Vermillion and Pray-Woodman Elementary are the latest addition to the schools’ character education programs, which have received state and national recognition.

Vermillion received a Kansas Honorable Mention Schools of Character award this summer for its Buddy Club and Buddy Bench programs. Last year, Pray-Woodman was named a Promising Practice in Character Education winner by the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Character Education Partnership.

Andrea Shipman, school counselor at Vermillion, said the Buddy Bench idea came from the students. Vitor Geromel, a second-grader last year, heard about the concept from his dad, who heard about it online – a group called Christian’s Buddy Bench, at www.buddybench.org.

“This group of kids is pretty amazing,” Shipman said. “They’re the ones who thought of it and brought it to us and really got it going.”

Here’s the way the Buddy Bench works: If someone is feeling lonely or left out during recess, he sits on the bench. Members of the school’s Buddy Club – a self-appointed group of do-gooders – monitor the bench and respond whenever someone sits on it by sitting and talking with the student or inviting him to play.

During classroom presentations at Vermillion last week, Eli, Alexis and Vitor invited classmates to join the Buddy Club by pledging to be nice and not bully. Membership is free, Alexis said, and open to anyone.

“Every class we’ve gone to so far, everybody raises their hand to be in it,” Vitor said.

Kindergartner Gabriel Doerflinger was one of many who smiled and raised his hand.

“I think the whole world needs this,” he said.

http://www.kansas.com/news/local/education/article1340986.html

at 6:57 pm

Back to School: Talk to your child about bullying

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http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/seattle/2014/09/01/understanding-and-preventing-bullying-and-anxiety/14923911/

at 6:57 pm

Parents claim school is not addressing bullying complaints

Some parents are dissatisfied with how a northern Iowa school district is handling complaints about bullying and harassment.

Louise Martinson told the Mason City Globe Gazette that her middle school-age daughter has been bullied the past three years.

Martinson says she’s gotten no calls back from the district and says her complaints are not being addressed by the Lake Mills district. She also says several other parents have reported similar problems.

District administrators they’re taking complaints about bullying and harassment seriously and are aware of the parents’ concerns.

District equity coordinator Kari Wagner says that because the district can’t speak publicly about individual cases, there’s often a perception that nothing has been done. She says that perception isn’t accurate or fair.

http://www.kcci.com/news/parents-claim-school-is-not-addressing-bullying-complaints/27821882

at 6:57 pm

Back to School: Talk to your child about bullying

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http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/seattle/2014/09/01/understanding-and-preventing-bullying-and-anxiety/14923911/

at 6:57 pm

Back to School: Talk to your child about bullying

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http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/seattle/2014/09/01/understanding-and-preventing-bullying-and-anxiety/14923911/

at 6:57 pm

Back to School: Talk to your child about bullying

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http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/seattle/2014/09/01/understanding-and-preventing-bullying-and-anxiety/14923911/

at 6:57 pm

Parents claim school is not addressing bullying complaints

Some parents are dissatisfied with how a northern Iowa school district is handling complaints about bullying and harassment.

Louise Martinson told the Mason City Globe Gazette that her middle school-age daughter has been bullied the past three years.

Martinson says she’s gotten no calls back from the district and says her complaints are not being addressed by the Lake Mills district. She also says several other parents have reported similar problems.

District administrators they’re taking complaints about bullying and harassment seriously and are aware of the parents’ concerns.

District equity coordinator Kari Wagner says that because the district can’t speak publicly about individual cases, there’s often a perception that nothing has been done. She says that perception isn’t accurate or fair.

http://www.kcci.com/news/parents-claim-school-is-not-addressing-bullying-complaints/27821882

at 6:57 pm

Parents claim school is not addressing bullying complaints

Some parents are dissatisfied with how a northern Iowa school district is handling complaints about bullying and harassment.

Louise Martinson told the Mason City Globe Gazette that her middle school-age daughter has been bullied the past three years.

Martinson says she’s gotten no calls back from the district and says her complaints are not being addressed by the Lake Mills district. She also says several other parents have reported similar problems.

District administrators they’re taking complaints about bullying and harassment seriously and are aware of the parents’ concerns.

District equity coordinator Kari Wagner says that because the district can’t speak publicly about individual cases, there’s often a perception that nothing has been done. She says that perception isn’t accurate or fair.

http://www.kcci.com/news/parents-claim-school-is-not-addressing-bullying-complaints/27821882

at 6:57 pm

Parents claim school is not addressing bullying complaints

Some parents are dissatisfied with how a northern Iowa school district is handling complaints about bullying and harassment.

Louise Martinson told the Mason City Globe Gazette that her middle school-age daughter has been bullied the past three years.

Martinson says she’s gotten no calls back from the district and says her complaints are not being addressed by the Lake Mills district. She also says several other parents have reported similar problems.

District administrators they’re taking complaints about bullying and harassment seriously and are aware of the parents’ concerns.

District equity coordinator Kari Wagner says that because the district can’t speak publicly about individual cases, there’s often a perception that nothing has been done. She says that perception isn’t accurate or fair.

http://www.kcci.com/news/parents-claim-school-is-not-addressing-bullying-complaints/27821882

at 6:57 pm

Parents claim school is not addressing bullying complaints

Some parents are dissatisfied with how a northern Iowa school district is handling complaints about bullying and harassment.

Louise Martinson told the Mason City Globe Gazette that her middle school-age daughter has been bullied the past three years.

Martinson says she’s gotten no calls back from the district and says her complaints are not being addressed by the Lake Mills district. She also says several other parents have reported similar problems.

District administrators they’re taking complaints about bullying and harassment seriously and are aware of the parents’ concerns.

District equity coordinator Kari Wagner says that because the district can’t speak publicly about individual cases, there’s often a perception that nothing has been done. She says that perception isn’t accurate or fair.

http://www.kcci.com/news/parents-claim-school-is-not-addressing-bullying-complaints/27821882

at 6:57 pm

‘Spark Kindness’ Program Aims To Empower Kids

Parents, students and teachers are gearing up for the new school year, and amid the shuffle between soccer practice, violin lessons and homework assignments, a Natick-based organization will make time for kindness. The group, Spark Kindness, began in 2010 as an anti-bullying initiative. Over the past four years, the focus evolved to include tips around teaching and promoting the power of kindness.

Christine Fortune Guthery, former civil litigator and founder of the Spark Kindness program, says kindness, though innate, is something to be practiced. She joined WBUR Monday to discuss.

Interview Highlights

Other instincts that compete with kindness

I think young people have an instinct towards kindness and that young people and adults want to live in a kind society. The problem is, we also have some other competing instincts. We have fear. We have a desire to be successful and noticed and recognized, and sometimes kindness can get lost in the shuffle, and that instinct can be difficult to practice.

The methods of teaching kindness

There are different levels of teaching kindness. We have kindness initiatives in the school. For example, the middle-schoolers themselves come up with ideas of how to spread kindness. They put notes on each other’s lockers, they write letters to their teachers and to the staff to say they appreciate them. We also have peer leadership programs that the schools have done. Peer leaders stick up for each other and lookout for people who have been bullied.

The other part of kindness is really teaching about empathy and teaching about tolerance, and it’s not easy. It takes a lot of restraint and discipline for children and for adults to not send that retaliatory email if somebody’s hurt your feelings, or hurt your child’s feelings. It takes a lot of discipline not to gossip. It takes a lot of courage to stand up for somebody who has been bullied. So these are things that need to be talked about and practiced.

Setbacks, and how to respond to them

We definitely need to address bullying head on, but we also need to accept that every child, every human being experiences setbacks, bumps in the road. And a lot of it is how to respond to those setbacks. How as parents, how as school leaders, coaches, how do we address children and talk to children so that they feel empowered to respond to those setbacks in life.

There are a lot of tools that young people can use, both in talking to themselves and framing challenges in life. Instead of saying that failure is the end, saying that failure is only the end if I give up.

http://www.wbur.org/2014/09/01/spark-kindness

at 6:57 pm

‘Spark Kindness’ Program Aims To Empower Kids

Parents, students and teachers are gearing up for the new school year, and amid the shuffle between soccer practice, violin lessons and homework assignments, a Natick-based organization will make time for kindness. The group, Spark Kindness, began in 2010 as an anti-bullying initiative. Over the past four years, the focus evolved to include tips around teaching and promoting the power of kindness.

Christine Fortune Guthery, former civil litigator and founder of the Spark Kindness program, says kindness, though innate, is something to be practiced. She joined WBUR Monday to discuss.

Interview Highlights

Other instincts that compete with kindness

I think young people have an instinct towards kindness and that young people and adults want to live in a kind society. The problem is, we also have some other competing instincts. We have fear. We have a desire to be successful and noticed and recognized, and sometimes kindness can get lost in the shuffle, and that instinct can be difficult to practice.

The methods of teaching kindness

There are different levels of teaching kindness. We have kindness initiatives in the school. For example, the middle-schoolers themselves come up with ideas of how to spread kindness. They put notes on each other’s lockers, they write letters to their teachers and to the staff to say they appreciate them. We also have peer leadership programs that the schools have done. Peer leaders stick up for each other and lookout for people who have been bullied.

The other part of kindness is really teaching about empathy and teaching about tolerance, and it’s not easy. It takes a lot of restraint and discipline for children and for adults to not send that retaliatory email if somebody’s hurt your feelings, or hurt your child’s feelings. It takes a lot of discipline not to gossip. It takes a lot of courage to stand up for somebody who has been bullied. So these are things that need to be talked about and practiced.

Setbacks, and how to respond to them

We definitely need to address bullying head on, but we also need to accept that every child, every human being experiences setbacks, bumps in the road. And a lot of it is how to respond to those setbacks. How as parents, how as school leaders, coaches, how do we address children and talk to children so that they feel empowered to respond to those setbacks in life.

There are a lot of tools that young people can use, both in talking to themselves and framing challenges in life. Instead of saying that failure is the end, saying that failure is only the end if I give up.

http://www.wbur.org/2014/09/01/spark-kindness

at 6:57 pm

‘Spark Kindness’ Program Aims To Empower Kids

Parents, students and teachers are gearing up for the new school year, and amid the shuffle between soccer practice, violin lessons and homework assignments, a Natick-based organization will make time for kindness. The group, Spark Kindness, began in 2010 as an anti-bullying initiative. Over the past four years, the focus evolved to include tips around teaching and promoting the power of kindness.

Christine Fortune Guthery, former civil litigator and founder of the Spark Kindness program, says kindness, though innate, is something to be practiced. She joined WBUR Monday to discuss.

Interview Highlights

Other instincts that compete with kindness

I think young people have an instinct towards kindness and that young people and adults want to live in a kind society. The problem is, we also have some other competing instincts. We have fear. We have a desire to be successful and noticed and recognized, and sometimes kindness can get lost in the shuffle, and that instinct can be difficult to practice.

The methods of teaching kindness

There are different levels of teaching kindness. We have kindness initiatives in the school. For example, the middle-schoolers themselves come up with ideas of how to spread kindness. They put notes on each other’s lockers, they write letters to their teachers and to the staff to say they appreciate them. We also have peer leadership programs that the schools have done. Peer leaders stick up for each other and lookout for people who have been bullied.

The other part of kindness is really teaching about empathy and teaching about tolerance, and it’s not easy. It takes a lot of restraint and discipline for children and for adults to not send that retaliatory email if somebody’s hurt your feelings, or hurt your child’s feelings. It takes a lot of discipline not to gossip. It takes a lot of courage to stand up for somebody who has been bullied. So these are things that need to be talked about and practiced.

Setbacks, and how to respond to them

We definitely need to address bullying head on, but we also need to accept that every child, every human being experiences setbacks, bumps in the road. And a lot of it is how to respond to those setbacks. How as parents, how as school leaders, coaches, how do we address children and talk to children so that they feel empowered to respond to those setbacks in life.

There are a lot of tools that young people can use, both in talking to themselves and framing challenges in life. Instead of saying that failure is the end, saying that failure is only the end if I give up.

http://www.wbur.org/2014/09/01/spark-kindness

at 6:57 pm

‘Spark Kindness’ Program Aims To Empower Kids

Parents, students and teachers are gearing up for the new school year, and amid the shuffle between soccer practice, violin lessons and homework assignments, a Natick-based organization will make time for kindness. The group, Spark Kindness, began in 2010 as an anti-bullying initiative. Over the past four years, the focus evolved to include tips around teaching and promoting the power of kindness.

Christine Fortune Guthery, former civil litigator and founder of the Spark Kindness program, says kindness, though innate, is something to be practiced. She joined WBUR Monday to discuss.

Interview Highlights

Other instincts that compete with kindness

I think young people have an instinct towards kindness and that young people and adults want to live in a kind society. The problem is, we also have some other competing instincts. We have fear. We have a desire to be successful and noticed and recognized, and sometimes kindness can get lost in the shuffle, and that instinct can be difficult to practice.

The methods of teaching kindness

There are different levels of teaching kindness. We have kindness initiatives in the school. For example, the middle-schoolers themselves come up with ideas of how to spread kindness. They put notes on each other’s lockers, they write letters to their teachers and to the staff to say they appreciate them. We also have peer leadership programs that the schools have done. Peer leaders stick up for each other and lookout for people who have been bullied.

The other part of kindness is really teaching about empathy and teaching about tolerance, and it’s not easy. It takes a lot of restraint and discipline for children and for adults to not send that retaliatory email if somebody’s hurt your feelings, or hurt your child’s feelings. It takes a lot of discipline not to gossip. It takes a lot of courage to stand up for somebody who has been bullied. So these are things that need to be talked about and practiced.

Setbacks, and how to respond to them

We definitely need to address bullying head on, but we also need to accept that every child, every human being experiences setbacks, bumps in the road. And a lot of it is how to respond to those setbacks. How as parents, how as school leaders, coaches, how do we address children and talk to children so that they feel empowered to respond to those setbacks in life.

There are a lot of tools that young people can use, both in talking to themselves and framing challenges in life. Instead of saying that failure is the end, saying that failure is only the end if I give up.

http://www.wbur.org/2014/09/01/spark-kindness

at 6:57 pm

‘Spark Kindness’ Program Aims To Empower Kids

Parents, students and teachers are gearing up for the new school year, and amid the shuffle between soccer practice, violin lessons and homework assignments, a Natick-based organization will make time for kindness. The group, Spark Kindness, began in 2010 as an anti-bullying initiative. Over the past four years, the focus evolved to include tips around teaching and promoting the power of kindness.

Christine Fortune Guthery, former civil litigator and founder of the Spark Kindness program, says kindness, though innate, is something to be practiced. She joined WBUR Monday to discuss.

Interview Highlights

Other instincts that compete with kindness

I think young people have an instinct towards kindness and that young people and adults want to live in a kind society. The problem is, we also have some other competing instincts. We have fear. We have a desire to be successful and noticed and recognized, and sometimes kindness can get lost in the shuffle, and that instinct can be difficult to practice.

The methods of teaching kindness

There are different levels of teaching kindness. We have kindness initiatives in the school. For example, the middle-schoolers themselves come up with ideas of how to spread kindness. They put notes on each other’s lockers, they write letters to their teachers and to the staff to say they appreciate them. We also have peer leadership programs that the schools have done. Peer leaders stick up for each other and lookout for people who have been bullied.

The other part of kindness is really teaching about empathy and teaching about tolerance, and it’s not easy. It takes a lot of restraint and discipline for children and for adults to not send that retaliatory email if somebody’s hurt your feelings, or hurt your child’s feelings. It takes a lot of discipline not to gossip. It takes a lot of courage to stand up for somebody who has been bullied. So these are things that need to be talked about and practiced.

Setbacks, and how to respond to them

We definitely need to address bullying head on, but we also need to accept that every child, every human being experiences setbacks, bumps in the road. And a lot of it is how to respond to those setbacks. How as parents, how as school leaders, coaches, how do we address children and talk to children so that they feel empowered to respond to those setbacks in life.

There are a lot of tools that young people can use, both in talking to themselves and framing challenges in life. Instead of saying that failure is the end, saying that failure is only the end if I give up.

http://www.wbur.org/2014/09/01/spark-kindness

at 6:57 pm

The problem of cyberbullying should have its own school subject – Principals

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

A dedicated class on cyberbullying should be introduced at both junior and senior cycle according to a group representing school principals.

The National Association of Principals and Deputy Principals (NAPD) made the proposal at today’s National Cyberbullying Conference in DCU.

The NAPD’s director Clive Byrne also said that more funding and training for school leaders is needed to help fight a problem that is growing year-on-year.

Research from the NAPD published in February showed that almost one in 10 students have said that they have cyberbullied another student.

“Parents want greater help with the problem of cyberbullying and look to schools and teachers to fill the information deficit which exists,” Clive Byrne said.

While the issue of cyberbullying has to be tackled in schools, homes and in the wider community, our schools have an important role to play, not least because of the amount of time which young people spend there.

N14224

The NAPD want this additional help to come in the form of a a dedicated classroom module on cyberbullying as part of the curriculum at both junior and senior cycles.

The development of school guidelines was a theme at the conference which saw contributions from the Special Rapporteur on Child Protection Geoffrey Shannon, Seán Kelly MEP with a discussion chaired by Mary Mitchell-O’Connor TD.

Shannon repeated his previously voiced view that legislation should be introduced to make cyberbullying a crime.

Sideline cut: Michael Lowry pitched in for suits for the Tipperary hurlers

These Dublin nuns have just done the holiest ice bucket challenge yet

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/problem-cyberbullying-own-school-subject-principals-175849843.html

at 6:57 pm

The problem of cyberbullying should have its own school subject – Principals

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

A dedicated class on cyberbullying should be introduced at both junior and senior cycle according to a group representing school principals.

The National Association of Principals and Deputy Principals (NAPD) made the proposal at today’s National Cyberbullying Conference in DCU.

The NAPD’s director Clive Byrne also said that more funding and training for school leaders is needed to help fight a problem that is growing year-on-year.

Research from the NAPD published in February showed that almost one in 10 students have said that they have cyberbullied another student.

“Parents want greater help with the problem of cyberbullying and look to schools and teachers to fill the information deficit which exists,” Clive Byrne said.

While the issue of cyberbullying has to be tackled in schools, homes and in the wider community, our schools have an important role to play, not least because of the amount of time which young people spend there.

N14224

The NAPD want this additional help to come in the form of a a dedicated classroom module on cyberbullying as part of the curriculum at both junior and senior cycles.

The development of school guidelines was a theme at the conference which saw contributions from the Special Rapporteur on Child Protection Geoffrey Shannon, Seán Kelly MEP with a discussion chaired by Mary Mitchell-O’Connor TD.

Shannon repeated his previously voiced view that legislation should be introduced to make cyberbullying a crime.

Sideline cut: Michael Lowry pitched in for suits for the Tipperary hurlers

These Dublin nuns have just done the holiest ice bucket challenge yet

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/problem-cyberbullying-own-school-subject-principals-175849843.html