April 19, 2014 at 11:23 pm

Kim Novak Speaks Up About Oscar Bullying

Kim Novak presented this year Oscars. Afterwards, she received bullying from numerous people about her appearance. Novak decided that she was tired of all the bullying and wanted to speak out against it.

She posted on Facebook:

“It’s time to address the elephant in the room…the Oscars. I was very excited when I was asked to be a presenter on the show. I was excited, yet nervous.
Years ago, I walked away from Hollywood partially because I didn’t stand up to the bullies. I caved in to the pressure instead of fighting for what I felt was right…and I didn’t have the courage to prove myself to my peers through my work.

After my appearance on the Oscars this year, I read all the jabs. I know what Donald Trump and others said, and I’m not going to deny that I had fat injections in my face. They seemed far less invasive than a face-lift. It was done in 2012 for the TCM interview special. In my opinion, a person has a right to look as good as they can, and I feel better when I look better.

When I was honored at the Cannes Film Festival last year, I received an overwhelming standing ovation. Yet, in Hollywood, after the Oscars, I was bullied by the press and the public on the Internet and TV. The only difference that night was that I had taken a pill to relax-that I shouldn’t have taken. I had been fasting for three days and it affected my behavior. I regret taking it.

However, I will no longer hold myself back from speaking out against bullies. We can’t let people get away with affecting our lives. We need to stand up to them in a healthy way by speaking out, working out and acting out. I am speaking out now because I don’t want to harbor unhealthy feelings inside me anymore.

One of the reasons I enjoy exercising and painting so much is that I can let out my frustrations and reactions to what’s happening in the world around me by working it out in a healthy way. It helps me, and doesn’t hurt anything or anybody. People need to get these things out of their systems and stand up to bullying. I believe there would be less suffering and violence, too!”

Novak began her acting career in 1954. Her early films include Picnic (1955), Pal Joey (1957), Vertigo (1958), Bell Book and Candle (1958), Middle of the Night (1959), and many more. Her last film was Liebestraum in 1991. She also appeared on a handful of television shows, such as Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1985).

http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwtv/article/Kim-Novak-Speaks-Up-About-Oscar-Bullying-20140419

at 11:23 pm

Bullying and Prevention Tactics

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http://guardianlv.com/2014/04/bullying-and-prevention-tactics/

at 11:23 pm

Childhood bullying victims more prone to depression, suicide, and anxiety in …

Bullying

New research has shed light on problems like suicide, anxiety and depression. A new study shows that these mental and physical problems may be linked to bullying during childhood years.

(Photo : Diego Grez)



A new study on the negative effects of bullying shows that children carry the mental, physical and social side effects well into adulthood. The new findings show that bullying during childhood can lead to depression, anxiety and even suicide in adults.

“Our study shows that the effects of bullying are still visible nearly four decades later,” said King’s College London researcher Ryu Takizawa. “The impact of bullying is persistent and pervasive, with health, social and economic consequences lasting well into adulthood.” Takizawa is also the lead author of the study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Takizawa and his colleagues found that the negative effects of bullying could linger in affected individuals for as long as 40 years. To conduct the study, the researchers analyzed data gathered by the British National Child Development Study on children born in the UK. The data was gathered during a week long process back in 1958. The team studied that data from 7,771 children that were between the ages of 7 and 11 back in the late 50s. Follow up data collection was also conducted until the children reached the age of 50.

According the team’s data, 28 percent of the children included in the study experienced occasional bullying. However, 15 percent of the children said that they experienced bullying on a regular basis. While the data may be considered old by scientific standards, the numbers reflected in the study are still pretty close to current statistics on bullying. 

“We need to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing-up,” said King’s College London Institute of Psychiatry professor Louise Arseneault. “Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions for children. Programs to stop bullying are extremely important, but we also need to focus our efforts on early intervention to prevent potential problems persisting into adolescence and adulthood.” Arseneault is also a senior author in the study.

Bullying is known to have a wide range of negative effects on bullied children. This includes both long term behavioral, emotional and sometimes even physical problems. Moreover, the worst effects of bullying can often lead to loneliness, low self-esteem, depression and a marked decrease in the body’s capacity to ward off illnesses.

Bullying is also known to have a direct causal relationship with some suicides. Moreover, the mental damage caused by bullying during childhood has also been speculated to trigger violence later in life. A number of serial killers and psychopaths have been known to be bullied early in life. Moreover, both Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris who caused the brutal Columbine High School Massacre back in 1999 also experienced bullying when they were younger. 

One of the more recent shootings was carried out by a high school student named Sergey Gordeev. The student walked into his kill in Moscow with two rifles killing a teacher and a police officer during the course of the incident. The study’s results is even more relevant today considering the recent string of high school shootings in the US and in other parts of the world.

“Children who are bullied-and especially those who are frequently bullied-continue to be at risk for a wide range of poor social, health, and economic outcomes nearly four decades after exposure. Interventions need to reduce bullying exposure in childhood and minimize long-term effects on victims’ well-being; such interventions should cast light on causal processes,” the study concludes.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/5794/20140419/childhood-bullying-victims-more-prone-to-depression-suicide-and-anxiety-in-adulthood-study.htm

at 5:23 pm

Pennsylvania bullying victim with learning disability charged with crime after …

Shea Love and her son Christian Stanfield.Shea Love via Facebook

Christian Stanfield (right), 15, was found guilty of disorderly conduct by a judge after he tried to get help against the bullies at school. His mother, Shea Love (left), is planning to take legal action after Stanfield’s high school disciplined her son for recording the bullies while they were plotting their next assault against him. 



A 15-year-old bullying victim with a learning disability was treated like a criminal after he recorded his schoolmates in the act.

Christian Stanfield’s mother is planning to take legal action after the South Fayette High School sophomore was disciplined by the Pennsylvania school and found guilty of disorderly conduct by a local magistrate during a hearing last month.

“When school districts engage in conduct like this and they are ignoring students’ cries for help and are instead supporting the bullying, that’s part of the problem,” the family’s lawyer, Jonathan D. Steele, told the Daily News on Tuesday.

Christian made the seven-minute recording on his school-approved iPad on Feb. 11. He played it for his mother at home before bringing it to the attention of school officials, hoping to get some help. According to court documents obtained by the Daily News, the teen was being harassed in math class when the recording took place.

A 15-year-old bullying victim with a learning disability was treated like a criminal after he recorded his schoolmates in the act at South Fayette High School. Jonathan D. Steele, the family's lawyer. WPXI

Lawyer Jonathan D. Steele says the disorderly conduct charge against the 15-year-old boy with a learning disability is bogus, and is planning civil action.

A 15-year-old bullying victim with a learning disability was treated like a criminal after he recorded his schoolmates in the act at South Fayette High School. WPXI

South Fayette High School officials were not sympathetic when they heard the recording, and called the cops.

  • A 15-year-old bullying victim with a learning disability was treated like a criminal after he recorded his schoolmates in the act at South Fayette High School. Jonathan D. Steele, the family's lawyer.
  • A 15-year-old bullying victim with a learning disability was treated like a criminal after he recorded his schoolmates in the act at South Fayette High School.

Enlarge

“You hear the one boy telling the other boy to pull Christian’s pants down,” mom Shea Love testified at the hearing last month. “The boy goes, no, I bet his tw– smells bad. They kept on and on at this. The teacher tells them, if it doesn’t have anything to do with math, then don’t talk. You can hear her trying to instruct Christian. She is obviously trying to help him learn math while they’re still continuing.”

School officials were not sympathetic when they heard the recording, and called the cops. Christian was then forced to play the recording in front of a police officer and school officials. He was then told to delete the recording.

When his mother arrived, he was extremely upset.

Shea Love and her son Christian Stanfield.Shea Love via Facebook

Stanfield was being harassed in math class when the recording took place. He made the seven-minute recording on his school-approved iPad on Feb. 11, and played it for his mother before bringing it to school officials.



“The first thing she did was give him a hug,” Steele said.

Christian was charged with disorderly conduct. School officials initially wanted to charge him with felony wiretapping but decided to go with disorderly conduct because they wanted to spare the boy a felony charge.

Steele believes even the disorderly conduct charge is bogus, and is confident he can get the judge’s verdict thrown out at another hearing later this month. Christian was hit with a $25 fine and court costs.

“It’s ridiculous,” Steele said.

Christian cannot process information as fast as the other kids, which makes the bullying during class time more frustrating.

“I just recorded it because I always felt like it wasn’t me being heard,” he testified last month. “Like, I’d always go home or tell my mom that this is happening, but I don’t actually have anything to show for it. So it was kind of like, basically my voice wasn’t being heard and I wanted some help. So it wasn’t, like, I — this wasn’t just a one-time thing. This always happens every day in that class.”

Steele, a former teacher himself, says he believes schools are not doing a good enough job dealing with bullies. He intends to file a civil suit on the teen’s behalf.

“Part of the problem is we need to focus on training the teachers a lot better,” Steele said. “There has to be a complete change with how to deal with bullying.”

dboroff@nydailynews.com

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http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/bullying-victim-charged-crime-recording-classmates-article-1.1757368

at 5:23 pm

A New Study Shows the True Impact of Childhood Bullying — and It’s Far Worse …

a, new, study, shows, the, true, impact, of, childhood, bullying, —, and, it's, far, worse, than, we, thought,
A New Study Shows the True Impact of Childhood Bullying — and It’s Far Worse Than We Thought
Image Credit: AP

The news: An incredible study coming out of the U.K. indicates that childhood bullying can affect the victims well into adulthood — even 40 years on.

For decades, a research team at King’s College London has been tracking a group of 7,771 people from England, Scotland and Wales who were all born in the same week in 1958. At age 7 and 11, their parents were asked to provide information on whether the children had been bullied. More than one in four had occasionally been bullied, while 15% were bullied frequently. Then later in life, the participants were asked to check in periodically and provide feedback on their health.

What the researchers found was shocking: At age 50, those who had been frequently bullied as a child were much more likely to have depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts and poor physical health than those who were not. In addition, they were less likely to have higher education degrees, high-paying jobs, romantic partners or social support. Even when childhood intelligence levels were taken into account, these adults also scored lower on cognitive IQ tests. In general, they reported lower quality of life and satisfaction.

“The impact of bullying is persistent and pervasive, with health, social and economic consequences lasting well into adulthood,” said Ryu Takizawa, the lead author of the paper.

The physiology of bullying: Participants were tested for “psychological distress and general health at the ages of 23 and 50, for psychiatric problems at 45 and cognitive functioning, social relationships and well-being at 50.”

Those who experienced frequent bullying had not only social and mental health problems, but poorer physical health and signs of early aging as well. Researchers see this as evidence that “bullying really gets under the skin and affects the biology at a cellular level.”

This discovery is in line with other studies which have shown that children who experienced early difficulty — poverty, abuse, violence, institutional care — were more likely to suffer from poor health. Their environments had caused damage to their genetic material: Those from unstable backgrounds had shortened telomeres, which protects DNA from harm and is an indicator of age and health.

“When we compared the effects to other childhood adversities such as being put in care, abuse by an adult or neglect, it is of the same scale. It is should be put in the same bracket,” said Louise Arseneault, a senior author of the study. ”Some children will be set on a pathway towards problems for the rest of their lives. We need to take bullying seriously and do all we can to prevent it and help those children when it does happen.”

The next steps: Arseneault believes the life-long repercussions of bullying can be prevented with early intervention, and that the only way that can happen is if adults take it more seriously. ”We need to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing up. Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions for children,” she said.

Certainly, the decades-long nature of this study lends credence to the idea that bullying is not an experience that is limited to childhood; like any other early trauma, it has the potential to have long-term consequences on a person’s life. Researchers now hope to find more biological data to support their claim; if victims of bullying end up having shorter telomeres as well, it will provide genetic evidence that they are at a physical disadvantage for the rest of their lives.

http://www.policymic.com/articles/87961/a-new-study-shows-the-true-impact-of-childhood-bullying-and-it-s-far-worse-than-we-thought

at 5:23 pm

The Psychological Toll Of Childhood Bullying Can Persist For Decades

A new study in the American Journal of Psychiatry finds what others had hinted at but not quite arrived at: That the effects of childhood bullying can last not only through adolescence and young adulthood, but also through middle age. Earlier studies had shown the negative psychological and social effects of bullying to be evident into a person’s 20s, but the new research tracked the psychological health and cognitive function of once-bullied kids till they were 50. And the effects of bullying – particularly of severe bullying – affected a person’s well-being in a great number of ways. All the more reason, the authors urge, to take bullying just as seriously as we would any other form of childhood abuse.

“Our study shows that the effects of bullying are still visible nearly four decades later,” said study author Ryu Takizawa of the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London. “The impact of bullying is persistent and pervasive, with health, social and economic consequences lasting well into adulthood.”

Homophobic bullying Fix poster 1 (Photo credit: FixersUK)

The study tracked over 7,700 children whose families were part of the British National Child Development Study, also known as the 1958 Birth Cohort Study, which captures data from all the children born within one week in 1958 in England, Scotland, and Wales. The parents provided information about the children, including any experiences with bullying, when they were 7 and 11 years old.

Over a quarter of the children in the study – 28% – had been bullied occasionally, and 15% bullied frequently, which the authors say is about what it is today.

The kids were followed as they aged, and asked about their mental health, social relationships, quality of life, and professional and economic situations.

It turned out that on almost every measure, people who’d been bullied as children had more problems across life. Being bullied either occasionally or frequently was linked to greater psychological distress at age 23 and age 50 – and being bullied frequently as a child was associated with greater risk for depression, anxiety, and suicidality at age 45. It was also linked to poorer cognitive function at age 50, which is a disturbing finding in itself. The authors suggest it may mirror the known link between childhood maltreatment and cognitive function or it could be a sign of early aging, both of which have been indicated by previous studies.

The team also found that frequent childhood bullying was linked to lower educational levels, a greater likelihood of being unemployed, and having a lower salary at age 50. People who had been bullied as children were also less likely to live with a partner or spouse at that age, less able to call on friends in the case of illness, and even less likely to have met up with friends in the recent past. People who had been bullied as kids were also not only less satisfied with their lives in the present, but they anticipated being less satisfied in the future, compared to non-bullied counterparts.

The results held strong even after the researchers controlled for potentially confounding factors like childhood IQ, the family’s socioeconomic status, and low parental involvement.

The question of why the effects of childhood bulling span the better part of a lifetime is not totally clear, but there are theories. The authors suggest that it may be that bullying creates a cycle of victimization that continues throughout life and impacts virtually every realm of life. Or it could be that the stress of being bullied “embeds” itself into the very genes, affecting the hormones and brain chemicals that govern the stress response, mood, and sensitivity to one’s environment.

The next step will be to find out what factors in life may reduce or amplify the lingering effects of bullying. “40 years is a long time,” says senior author Louise Arseneault, “so there will no doubt be additional experiences during the course of these young people’s lives which may either protect them against the effects of bullying, or make things worse. Our next step is to investigate what these are.”

But in the meantime, early intervention is key. The results, the authors say, are strong evidence that we need to take bullying even more seriously, since it’s no different from any other form of child abuse. ”We need to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing-up,” said Arseneault. “Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions for children.” And it will be a joint project. Public and school programs can do their parts, but teaching our kids from the earliest age to treat peers with kindness and respect will be an equally important part of the process.

For more information on anti-bullying programs please see StopBullying.gov, StopBullyingNow.com, or stopbullyingnowfoundation.org, or pacer.org.

Follow me @alicewalton or find me on Facebook.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2014/04/18/the-effects-of-childhood-bullying-can-last-a-lifetime/

at 5:23 pm

Mom's emotional advice on cyberbullying

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

Mom of suicide victim, Rebecca Sedwick, advises parents of bully victims and bullies to seek counseling.

If your browser has Adobe Flash Player installed, click above to play. Otherwise, click below.

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/bestoftv/2013/11/26/bts-newday-cyberbullying-victim.cnn.html

at 5:23 pm

Illinois appeals court finds school district immune from bullying lawsuit

The Second District Illinois Court of Appeals recently issued an opinion in a case involving a school district’s alleged response to student-on-student bullying. The court in Malinski v. Grayslake Community High School District 127 dismissed the lawsuit against the school district, finding that school officials’ responses to complaints of bullying by a student were discretionary policy decisions for which the school district was immune.

In Malinski, a high school student alleged that school officials repeatedly turned a blind eye to physical and verbal abuse and bullying that he suffered during school hours and on school property. The student alleged that the school district breached a “duty to provide a safe environment” by willfully, wantonly, and with reckless disregard for his safety ignoring the warnings of bullying and allowing the abuse to continue. The school district moved to dismiss the lawsuit based on the Local Governmental and Governmental Employees Tort Immunity Act, which immunizes discretionary policy decisions of school officials from liability. The student responded that the school district’s duty to carry out the bullying policy it had implemented under the Illinois School Code was a ministerial act not protected by immunity.

Relying on prior Illinois bullying cases discussing the Tort Immunity Act, the court held that on the facts alleged, the school district’s decision was a discretionary policy decision immune from liability. The court first made clear that the mere fact that the School Code requires school districts to implement a bullying policy does not necessarily mean that the carrying out of that policy is a ministerial act. Rather, the policy can leave significant discretion to school officials on issues such as whether bullying has occurred, what consequences will result, and appropriate remedial actions. The court then held that because the plaintiff had failed to attach a copy of the bullying policy at issue, it could not determine whether the particular policy at issue in the case required a specific response to the bullying that was alleged, thus potentially making the actions in carrying out the policy ministerial.

The court’s decision does not set forth any new law on this issue, but is an important reminder that allowing flexibility to school officials in bullying policies may provide certain protections to the school district in the face of a state law bullying claim. Notably, the case did not address other types of liability that school districts may face when addressing bullying complaints, such as liability under federal laws and agency regulations. School officials should thus continue to reasonably address and respond to all allegations of bullying that are received.

http://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=5508d407-75a2-458d-a346-498050d6ccd1

at 11:23 am

Father accused of threats says school didn’t stop bullying

ASHLAND CITY, TN (WSMV) -

A Cheatham County father says he had to take matters into his own hands when his daughter was constantly bullied. He’s now facing charges for making threats but says stepping in was worth it.

The dad says officials at Cheatham County Middle School didn’t do enough to combat three bullies who went after his child.

“She was so scared and hurt she couldn’t even talk,” the father said.

His daughter came home from school Thursday afternoon in tears.

“She was bawling. Her face was real red,” he said.

The father says three girls poked his daughter in the head on the playground and then again on the bus.

They made fun of the teen, saying she had lice.

“The more I looked at her, the more madder I got,” her father said.

He was so mad, in fact, the dad called the school repeatedly. And, according to investigators, he made serious threats.

“He told that employee that, ‘I’m coming to the school. When I get there, I hope y’all have enough ambulances,’” said Cheatham County Sheriff’s Investigator Dale Smith. “They all interpreted it as he was going to come there and cause harm to people at the school.”

Authorities placed the school on lockdown in the middle of a science fair, then charged the dad under a new law. Just last year, Tennessee lawmakers stiffened the punishments for those who threaten school staffers.

“It’s an extreme disruption not only to the school and the events they’re having, but also, you’re taking resources from law enforcement for a threat that’s just somebody who’s upset. But, of course, in today’s day and time with all the school stabbings and shootings and everything else, these are serious threats,” Smith said.

The dad denies making any threats and says he was simply fed up. He and his wife have called complaining about bullying before.

“When I called the first time, they should have taken it seriously. They didn’t,” the father said.

The father says he would do anything to protect his child, even go to jail.

“If that’s what it takes, that’s where I’m going,” he said.

Investigators aren’t backing down either.

Deputies say the bullying part of this investigation is out of their hands. School officials and the school resource officer will handle that.

Channel 4 News reached out to those officials Friday, but because it’s a holiday, we have yet to hear back.

Copyright 2014 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

http://www.wsmv.com/story/25287132/father-accused-of-threats-says-school-didnt-stop-bullying

at 5:23 am

Nightmare of bullying doesn’t end with adulthood

A decades-long study on the effects of childhood bullying confirmed what many researchers,
parents and victims probably know too well: The harm doesn’t necessarily fade with age.

Well into midlife — up to age 50 in the study — people who were bullied had higher rates of
psychological distress, more economic hardship, fewer social relationships and less satisfaction
with their overall quality of life.

“It is striking to show that 40 years after having been bullied in childhood, individuals
continue to show persistent and pervasive negative outcomes,” said senior investigator Louise
Arseneault of King’s College London in the United Kingdom.

The effects were similar to those of being placed in foster care or facing multiple childhood
adversities, researchers said. They were independent of social class, IQ and other predictors of
poor outcomes.

The findings from the British National Child Development Study are online today in the
American Journal of Psychiatry.

The study is based on more than 7,700 participants, all of them born in one week in 1958, whose
parents reported that their children were being bullied between ages 7 and 11 years old. Follow-up
assessments took place between ages 23 and 50.

Kip Williams, a psychology professor at Purdue University who studies ostracism, said the
potential for re-injury remains. “When you think about social pain — being humiliated or ostracized
or embarrassed — thinking about that again causes the pain to resurface,” he said. “You basically
re-live that pain over and over again, unlike with physical pain.”

The researchers noted that the study did not attempt to define
bullying, relying instead on what parents reported. Rates still were consistent with
contemporary findings on prevalence: Of all the children born in that week in 1958, about 28
percent had been exposed to occasional bullying, and 15 percent had been frequently bullied.

Children who suffered the most were at higher risk for depression, anxiety disorders and suicide
as adults.

Dr. Stuart Twemlow, a professor of psychiatry at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said
the study is well-done and not surprising to those who see the continued fallout from social
ostracism and bullying.

“I very much credit the authors for having persisted with the study,” Twemlow said. “And I
strongly suggest that governments listen to these kinds of data.”

Twemlow, who has long studied social trauma, said anti-bullying programs in schools generally
fail. The key is not a simplistic focus on one word or type of behavior but to create better
climates within schools, he said.

The right kind of leadership from principals and teachers is more effective than anti-bullying
workshops, Twemlow said. He once counseled a bullied student who moved away from Columbine High
School — months before the mass shootings there in 1999 — “because he couldn’t stand the school.
And Columbine had an anti-bullying program.”

Both he and Williams said communities need more insight into isolation and bullying because the
potential is always there.

“It’s not a very nice thing about us human beings,” Twemlow said. “We can get pleasure from
others’ pain.”

rprice@dispatch.com

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/04/18/nightmare-of-bullying-doesnt-end.html

at 5:23 am

Effects of childhood bullying still evident 40 years later, study says

bullied child

The negative social, physical and mental health effects of childhood bullying are still evident nearly 40 years later, according to research by British psychiatrists.

In the first study of its kind to look at the effects of childhood bullying beyond early adulthood, the researchers said its impact is “persistent and pervasive”, with people who were bullied when young more likely to have poorer physical and psychological health and poorer cognitive functioning at age 50.

“The effects of bullying are still visible nearly four decades later … with health, social and economic consequences lasting well into adulthood,” said Ryu Takizawa, who led the study at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London.

The findings, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry on Friday, come from the British National Child Development Study which includes data on all children born in England, Scotland and Wales during one week in 1958.

It included 7,771 children whose parents gave information on their child’s exposure to bullying when they were aged 7 and 11. The children were then followed up until they reached 50.

Bullying is characterized by repeated hurtful actions by children of a similar age, where the victim finds it difficult to defend themselves.

More than a quarter of children in the study – 28 percent – had been bullied occasionally, and 15 percent were bullied frequently – rates that the researchers said were similar to the situation in Britain today.

The study, which adjusted for other factors such as childhood IQ, emotional and behavioral problems and low parental involvement, found people who were frequently bullied in childhood were at an increased risk of mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and experiencing suicidal thoughts.

Victims of bullying were also more likely to have lower educational levels, less likely to be in a relationship and more likely to report lower quality of life. Men who had been bullied were also more likely to be unemployed and earn less.

Louise Arseneault, also from the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s and who also worked on the study, said its findings showed how important it is “to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing-up.”

“Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions,” she said.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/04/18/effects-childhood-bullying-still-evident-40-years-later-study-says/

at 5:23 am

Police file raises questions about bullying in Rebecca Sedwick’s suicide


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a href='http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/26/justice/rebecca-sedwick-bullying-death/'Rebecca Sedwick/a, 12, jumped to her death in September. The Florida girl had complained of bullying by classmates months before her death. Two girls were charged with aggravated stalking in connection with the case, but charges were dropped a month later, and it was recommended that the girls receive counseling. Alleged bullies may be charged with criminal offenses after the suicide of a victim, but experts disagree on whether bullying leads directly to suicide. Click through the gallery for more examples.Rebecca Sedwick, 12, jumped to her death in September. The Florida girl had complained of bullying by classmates months before her death. Two girls were charged with aggravated stalking in connection with the case, but charges were dropped a month later, and it was recommended that the girls receive counseling. Alleged bullies may be charged with criminal offenses after the suicide of a victim, but experts disagree on whether bullying leads directly to suicide. Click through the gallery for more examples.

Canadian a href='http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/08/world/americas/canada-teen-suicide-arrests/'Rehtaeh Parsons/a, who was allegedly gang-raped and bullied, was hospitalized after she tried to hang herself in April 2013. The 17-year-old high school student from Halifax, Nova Scotia, was taken off life support three days later. Two 18-year-old men faced child pornography charges in connection with the case.Canadian Rehtaeh Parsons, who was allegedly gang-raped and bullied, was hospitalized after she tried to hang herself in April 2013. The 17-year-old high school student from Halifax, Nova Scotia, was taken off life support three days later. Two 18-year-old men faced child pornography charges in connection with the case.

Rutgers University freshman a href='http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/05/justice/new-jersey-tyler-clementi-lawsuit/'Tyler Clementi/a jumped to his death from a bridge in September 2010. Celementi's college roommate had used a webcam to secretly stream a sexual encounter involving Clementi and a partner. The roommate, Dharun Ravi, was convicted of bias intimidation, invasion of privacy and witness tampering.Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi jumped to his death from a bridge in September 2010. Celementi’s college roommate had used a webcam to secretly stream a sexual encounter involving Clementi and a partner. The roommate, Dharun Ravi, was convicted of bias intimidation, invasion of privacy and witness tampering.

a href='http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/04/08/massachusetts.bullying.suicide/'Phoebe Prince/a, 15, hanged herself in January 2010 after enduring taunts from classmates at South Hadley High School in Massachusetts. Several teens were charged with crimes in connection with her bullying, but most charges were reduced in severity or dropped.Phoebe Prince, 15, hanged herself in January 2010 after enduring taunts from classmates at South Hadley High School in Massachusetts. Several teens were charged with crimes in connection with her bullying, but most charges were reduced in severity or dropped.

a href='http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/07/world/europe/uk-social-media-bullying/'Hannah Smith/a, 14, hanged herself in her home, allegedly after being attacked by trolls on the site Ask.fm after seeking advice on the skin condition eczema, her father told UK media. Her death added fuel to calls in Britain for action to prevent abuse on social media after outrage over rape and bomb threats made against other women via Twitter.Hannah Smith, 14, hanged herself in her home, allegedly after being attacked by “trolls” on the site Ask.fm after seeking advice on the skin condition eczema, her father told UK media. Her death added fuel to calls in Britain for action to prevent abuse on social media after outrage over rape and bomb threats made against other women via Twitter.

Canadian teen a href='http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/12/world/americas/canada-teen-bullying/'Amanda Todd/a posted a YouTube video to express her anguish after becoming the target of bullies when risque photos of Todd surfaced online, allegedly posted online by a man with whom she'd communicated. After posting the plea I have nobody. I need someone. My name is Amanda Todd, she took her life at 15 years old in October 2012. A a href='http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/amanda-todd-case-rcmp-detail-5-charges-against-dutch-citizen-1.2614034' target='_blank'Dutch man has been arrested/a in connection with the case, according to the CBC.Canadian teen Amanda Todd posted a YouTube video to express her anguish after becoming the target of bullies when risque photos of Todd surfaced online, allegedly posted online by a man with whom she’d communicated. After posting the plea “I have nobody. I need someone. My name is Amanda Todd,” she took her life at 15 years old in October 2012. A Dutch man has been arrested in connection with the case, according to the CBC.


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Editor’s note: Kelly Wallace is CNN’s digital correspondent and editor-at-large covering family, career and life. She is a mom of two. Read her other columns and follow her reports at CNN Parents and on Twitter.

(CNN) — It is a case about alleged bullying that garnered national and international attention.

Before she jumped to her death in September,12-year-old Rebecca Sedwick of Lakeland, Florida, was repeatedly bulled on- and offline, Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said at the time.

About a month later, Judd announced that two teens, 12-year-old Katelyn Roman and 14-year-old Guadalupe Shaw, were charged with aggravated stalking and accused of being Sedwick’s chief tormentors.

But then, just a month after the arrests, the charges were dropped, with attorneys for the accused citing “zero evidence” of stalking in the case. (CNN does not typically identify minors who are charged as juveniles, but the network is doing so in this case because their identities have been publicized by law enforcement and have received broad publicity in local media.)

Now, as the extensive police file surrounding the case has become public, there are new questions about what evidence existed to back up claims that Roman and Shaw cyberbullied Sedwick and that their bullying, on- and offline, continued right up until her suicide, as alleged by the Polk County sheriff.


Bullying charges dropped in Sedwick case


The fight against bullying


Sheriff defends actions


Mom’s emotional advice on cyberbullying

‘Abysmal lack of any evidence’

“I don’t think I was prepared for the abysmal lack … of any evidence of bullying for the seven months prior to her suicide,” said Nancy Willard, director of Embrace Civility in the Digital Age, a group that focuses on combating cyberbullying, and author of a handful of books including “Positive Relations @ School ( Elsewhere).”

Are we too quick to cry ‘bully’?

Willard, who has no direct affiliation with the case, obtained the police files and reviewed them. She points to the Sedwick case as yet another example of law enforcement and the media being quick to make a judgment that bullying caused a suicide when other factors might have been at work.

“The research … clearly indicates that when bullying is implicated in a suicide, there are other factors involved,” Willard said, referring to research on bullying in general. “Are we going to, at this point in time, any time a child suicides, find another kid to blame?”

Judd’s office says it stands by the arrests and the investigation. The police documents “support the probable cause that our detectives found during their investigation — probable cause that clearly supported the charges of aggravated stalking,” said Donna Wood, a public information officer for the Polk County Sheriff’s Office.

“We never said that bullying was the only reason Rebecca committed suicide,” Judd told The Associated Press. “But what the bullies did is that they continued to stack bricks on an already overloaded wagon till finally, it broke.”

Inside the police file

More than a year before her death, Sedwick had been battling depression resulting from her deteriorating relationship with her father, according to intake reports from a counselor that are included in the police file. She also complained about fights between her mother and stepfather. The file, which has been reviewed by CNN, says she cut herself on a few occasions, had suicidal ideations and had been committed for psychiatric evaluation for two days.

In November 2012, she accused her mother of abusing her and then took back the accusation, saying she was pushed to lie by classmates who forced her off campus and told her they wouldn’t let her return home unless she lied to an officer. Her mother denied abusing Sedwick but said she slapped the girl’s face once during an argument about Sedwick being too young to date.

Sometime before her death, Sedwick’s relationship with an online boyfriend came to an end, according to the documents. Family conflict, in addition to bullying from girls at school, weighed on her.

When friends become bullies

In her notes, Sedwick wrote about suicide and in the weeks before her death she did Web searches on how many sleeping pills or Advil it would take to die.

Mother: Bullying was the cause


Looking for justice


Schools to monitor student social media

As a more complicated picture of Sedwick emerged in media reports about the police file last week, Tricia Norman, Sedwick’s mother, said people were looking for other sources to blame. Norman told The Ledger, a local newspaper in Lakeland, that she remains convinced bullying was the reason her daughter decided to end her life.

“I really don’t think there was any other factors involved,” said Norman, who accused people of trying to dig into her personal life. She added: “What Rebecca was upset over in her life was these girls not leaving her alone.”

Norman alleged in a recent interview with CNN that once Sedwick’s suicide and the bullying allegations began making headlines, the girl’s Ask.fm social networking page was deleted from the site. Any evidence of bullying may have been wiped away, she said.

“I most certainly want to know what happened. … I know she was bullied, I know it was horrific, but that morning is what pushed her over the edge,” Norman said.

Norman and Judd are on a mission to ensure that companies behind “disappearing apps” that can be used for bullying keep records of data that passes through the sites and provide it to law enforcement when appropriate.

Ask.fm said it cooperates willingly with authorities and recently added a “safety” page to its website, saying bullies are not tolerated. The company said in a statement: “From our experience we have seen that reports of suicide cases often tend to present premature and simplified conclusions about tragic events, which are always a complex overlap of different factors.”

Norman’s attorney, David Henry, said last week that he has evidence to prove that Sedwick was repeatedly bullied until her suicide and that the bullying was a cause of her death.

“Our position is that the bullying did continue under a few different forms, but had the school stepped in and stopped these girls early on, then it would not have continued, and it would not have built up,” said Henry, who would not comment on specific evidence proving the ongoing bullying.

Bullying’s mental health toll may last years

Henry said he plans to go forward with a lawsuit against the Polk County School Board and one or both of the girls who were arrested in the case.

“As of right now, on our end, we haven’t received the lawsuit, and we wouldn’t comment until that actually does happen,” a Polk County School Board representative said. The girls’ attorneys could not be reached for comment.

Teens admit some ‘bullying

What’s not in question is that Sedwick had issues and run-ins with Roman, Shaw and possibly others from December 2012 through February 2013, seven months prior to her suicide.

In an interview with investigators, Roman confessed that she “bullied” Sedwick during the sixth grade at Crystal Lake Middle School, calling her names such as “ugly” and saying she was a “ho.” Shortly after a fight in February 2013, she admitted sending Sedwick a message saying “No one will miss you if you die.” During the police interview, she also said that she was “sorry” for bullying Sedwick.

Shaw, who went on to date Sedwick’s ex-boyfriend shortly after they broke up, admitted under questioning to sending a Facebook message to Sedwick stating “Nobody likes you” and said that she used to “bully” Sedwick but that it had been a long time.

Other students remembered it. A student who said Shaw bullied her in elementary school said she witnessed Shaw tell Sedwick that she “should go kill herself’ and that she “should die” on numerous occasions during the school year.

Another student told investigators she observed Shaw bullying Sedwick on a daily basis between December 2012 and January 2013 and recalled a specific incident in which Shaw told Sedwick to “drink bleach and die.”

CNN's Kelly Wallace's previous story on the Sedwick case involved a look at new apps teens were using to bully.

Norman, Sedwick’s mother, said the bullying got so bad that she took her daughter out of Crystal Lake Middle School in February 2013, home-schooled her for the remainder of the school year and enrolled her in a new school in September. At the time of Sedwick’s death, Norman said, she had only recently learned that the bullying from former Crystal Lake classmates had continued via social media and text applications.

Little evidence of cyberbullying

The police file does not contain extensive evidence that the bullying continued until Sedwick’s death. There is also little evidence to support Judd’s claim that Shaw and Roman repeatedly bullied her online.

In one text exchange with an unidentified friend, Roman says she bullied Sedwick in person and online, according to the police documents. When her friend asked, “So your telling me for the past few weeks you’ve been bullying her online?” Roman responds, “Yea im bully i deserve to die it was me and not her.”

The piece of cyberevidence, which Judd said led to the arrest of Shaw and Roman, was a Facebook post on Shaw’s page on October 12th of last year, which said, “Yes … I bullied REBECCA nd she killed her self but IDGAF,” the ending short for “I don’t give a f***.” But Shaw’s parents said that she was asleep at the time of that posting and that her account had to have been hacked.

Parents, beware of bullying on sites you’ve never seen

Sedwick’s family captured screen shots of anonymous messages on various text message apps telling Sedwick to “kill” herself and to “just die,” but those messages were ultimately deleted.

Judd’s office said it attempted to obtain records from companies that run anonymous social media apps, and the requests “were in process” at the time the state attorney “resolved the charges” with Shaw and Roman, said Wood, the sheriff’s spokeswoman. “Because the case was closed at that time, we ended our attempt to obtain the records from those companies.”

Although no one can yet say who sent those anonymous messages, it is clear that Rebecca Sedwick was a girl in turmoil.

In the police file, there are handwritten notes from Sedwick, including one in which she listed “bad things” people called her such as “ugly, “slut” and “outcast” and “good things” she got called including “pretty,” “nice” and “beautiful.” At the bottom of the page was the word “suicidal.”

Another one of her notes began, “There is a war in my mind,” according to the police file.

Why telling bullying victims to ‘just fight back’ doesn’t work

“She was fighting with herself over whether to commit suicide,” said Willard, who wrote her first book about cyberbullying in 2007.

Willard hopes the Sedwick case raises awareness not just on how bullying “is never the whole cause” of suicide but on how the whole theory that bullying causes suicide can end up endangering children who are suffering. For instance, she points to a case in Illinois where a student who was bullied killed himself the day after watching a movie in school about bullying.

“There’s absolutely zero evidence that that’s going to stop kids from bullying, but there’s major concern that it’s going to give kids who are being bullied the idea that that’s something they should consider.”

For more on this story, follow Kelly Wallace on Twitter and like CNN Living on Facebook.



http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/18/living/rebecca-sedwick-bullying-suicide-follow-parents/

at 5:23 am

Timeline: Amanda Todd investigation

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

The 2012 death of Amanda Todd drew international outrage over the devastating effects of cyberbullying and online exploitation after the British Columbia teen took her own life following years of verbal abuse, bullying and blackmail at the hands of online tormentors. 

Here is a timeline of the police investigation into Todd’s case, and subsequent efforts to combat cyberbullying:

Sept. 7, 2012: B.C. teen Amanda Todd, 15, posts a video to Youtube in which she describes the two years of torment she endured as the target of online sexual exploitation, stalking, bullying and harassment. Using flash cards to tell her story, Todd also describes her resulting descent into depression, self-harm and a suicide attempt. The video ends with a desperate plea for help.  

Oct. 10, 2012: Todd is found dead of apparent suicide in her Port Coquitlam home.

Oct. 12, 2012: RCMP launch an investigation to examine the circumstances surrounding Todd’s suicide, including the possibility that bullying played a role in the teen’s death. Her Youtube video draws millions of views in the months following her death.

Oct. 15, 2012: MPs in the House of Commons debate a motion to create a national bullying prevention strategy. Todd’s story is mentioned in the debate.

Oct. 19, 2012: Candlelight vigils are held in 40 cities around the world to honour Todd and to draw awareness to the issue of bullying.

Nov. 1, 2012: Canada’s justice and public safety ministers form a working group to address cyberbullying.

April 2013: In the wake of Nova Scotia teen Rehtaeh Parsons’ death, Amanda’s mother, Carol Todd, says she is stunned by how “shockingly similar” Parsons’ story of bullying and suicide is to that of her daughter’s.

April 2013: Saskatchewan passes motion urging Criminal Code changes to stop cyberbullies.

June 2012: British Columbia Premier Christy Clark announces a $2-million, 10-point strategy to address bullying in schools.

May 10, 2013: Prime Minister Stephen Harper meets with relatives of four teenage girls who died after being cyberbullied or lured online to discuss possible ways to crack down on internet tormentors. Carol Todd, who attended the roundtable, says afterward that she was “pleased with the meeting because (Harper) took the time to listen to us.”

Aug. 8, 2013: Nova Scotia passes new cyberbullying legislation, in which residents of the province can sue or seek a protection order from the courts if they or their children are being cyberbullied. Carol Todd says she is happy to see the province take steps to fight cyberbullying.

Nov. 20, 2013: The federal government tables a new cyberbullying bill that will prevent the non-consensual distribution of intimate images and will make the act a crime punishable by up to five years in jail.

April 17, 2014: RCMP confirm that a Dutch man is facing extortion and child pornography charges in connection with Todd’s online bullying case. At a news conference, Carol Todd says it is a day “that we’ve been waiting for.”

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/timeline-amanda-todd-investigation-1.1782168

at 5:22 am

Timeline: Amanda Todd cyberbullying case

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

The 2012 death of Amanda Todd drew international outrage over the devastating effects of cyberbullying and online exploitation after the British Columbia teen took her own life following years of verbal abuse, bullying and blackmail at the hands of online tormentors. 

Here is a timeline of the police investigation into Todd’s case, and subsequent efforts to combat cyberbullying:

Sept. 7, 2012: B.C. teen Amanda Todd, 15, posts a video to Youtube in which she describes the two years of torment she endured as the target of online sexual exploitation, stalking, bullying and harassment. Using flash cards to tell her story, Todd also describes her resulting descent into depression, self-harm and a suicide attempt. The video ends with a desperate plea for help.  

Oct. 10, 2012: Todd is found dead of apparent suicide in her Port Coquitlam home.

Oct. 12, 2012: RCMP launch an investigation to examine the circumstances surrounding Todd’s suicide, including the possibility that bullying played a role in the teen’s death. Her Youtube video draws millions of views in the months following her death.

Oct. 15, 2012: MPs in the House of Commons debate a motion to create a national bullying prevention strategy. Todd’s story is mentioned in the debate.

Oct. 19, 2012: Candlelight vigils are held in 40 cities around the world to honour Todd and to draw awareness to the issue of bullying.

Nov. 1, 2012: Canada’s justice and public safety ministers form a working group to address cyberbullying.

April 2013: In the wake of Nova Scotia teen Rehtaeh Parsons’ death, Amanda’s mother, Carol Todd, says she is stunned by how “shockingly similar” Parsons’ story of bullying and suicide is to that of her daughter’s.

April 2013: Saskatchewan passes motion urging Criminal Code changes to stop cyberbullies.

June 2012: British Columbia Premier Christy Clark announces a $2-million, 10-point strategy to address bullying in schools.

May 10, 2013: Prime Minister Stephen Harper meets with relatives of four teenage girls who died after being cyberbullied or lured online to discuss possible ways to crack down on internet tormentors. Carol Todd, who attended the roundtable, says afterward that she was “pleased with the meeting because (Harper) took the time to listen to us.”

Aug. 8, 2013: Nova Scotia passes new cyberbullying legislation, in which residents of the province can sue or seek a protection order from the courts if they or their children are being cyberbullied. Carol Todd says she is happy to see the province take steps to fight cyberbullying.

Nov. 20, 2013: The federal government tables a new cyberbullying bill that will prevent the non-consensual distribution of intimate images and will make the act a crime punishable by up to five years in jail.

April 17, 2014: RCMP confirm that a Dutch man is facing extortion and child pornography charges in connection with Todd’s online bullying case. At a news conference, Carol Todd says it is a day “that we’ve been waiting for.”

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/timeline-amanda-todd-cyberbullying-case-1.1782168

April 18, 2014 at 11:22 pm

Senate set to review Fine’s bill on cyber bullying

The Illinois House of Representatives has passed legislation to help protect children from cyber bullying.

Authored by Rep. Laura Fine, House Bill 4207 expands the definition of bullying to include cyber bullying that occurs outside of school and on computers and digital equipment not owned by schools.

Under existing law, students face discipline only when bullying takes place on school grounds, at a school activity or on a school computer.

“It is always difficult to see a child struggle with peer pressure and bullying, especially when it takes place in cyberspace leaving children and their parents feeling helpless,” said Fine said, D-17, whose district covers includes Evanston, Glenview, Golf, Morton Grove, Northbrook, Northfield, Skokie, and Wilmette.

“Unfortunately, in our digital world, the challenge our young people must navigate continues to grow through the Internet, social media, cell phones and other mediums,” she said.

Fine’s legislation is modeled after laws in other states that have addressed the growing problem of cyber bullying, she said in a release.

“Students should not be able to get away with bullying classmates and disturbing their learning environment, whether they commit these acts at school or outside of school,” she said.

Fine said some groups opposing the bill believed it violated free speech rights.

In initiating her bill, Fine said she spoke to a psychologist about how bullying can have long-term effects.

The Elementary Secondary Education Committee approved an amended bill on March 25, and state Rep. Lou Lang, D-16, is a co-sponsor.

The bill now goes before the Illinois Senate.

http://glenview.suntimes.com/news/bully-GLA-04242014:article

at 11:22 pm

Forty years on, bullying takes its toll on health and wealth


LONDON (Reuters) – The negative social, physical and mental health effects of childhood bullying are still evident nearly 40 years later, according to research by British psychiatrists.

In the first study of its kind to look at the effects of childhood bullying beyond early adulthood, the researchers said its impact is “persistent and pervasive”, with people who were bullied when young more likely to have poorer physical and psychological health and poorer cognitive functioning at age 50.

“The effects of bullying are still visible nearly four decades later … with health, social and economic consequences lasting well into adulthood,” said Ryu Takizawa, who led the study at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London.

The findings, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry on Friday, come from the British National Child Development Study which includes data on all children born in England, Scotland and Wales during one week in 1958.

It included 7,771 children whose parents gave information on their child’s exposure to bullying when they were aged 7 and 11. The children were then followed up until they reached 50.

Bullying is characterized by repeated hurtful actions by children of a similar age, where the victim finds it difficult to defend themselves.

More than a quarter of children in the study – 28 percent – had been bullied occasionally, and 15 percent were bullied frequently – rates that the researchers said were similar to the situation in Britain today.

The study, which adjusted for other factors such as childhood IQ, emotional and behavioral problems and low parental involvement, found people who were frequently bullied in childhood were at an increased risk of mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and experiencing suicidal thoughts.

Victims of bullying were also more likely to have lower educational levels, less likely to be in a relationship and more likely to report lower quality of life. Men who had been bullied were also more likely to be unemployed and earn less.

Louise Arseneault, also from the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s and who also worked on the study, said its findings showed how important it is “to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing-up.”

“Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions,” she said.

(Reporting by Kate Kelland; Editing by Robin Pomeroy)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/17/us-bullying-idUSBREA3G2GR20140417

at 5:23 pm

Town hall puts spotlight on bullying in Knoxville – WBIR

(WBIR-Knoxville) The topic of bullying, and a conversation about how to stop it, took center stage in Knoxville on Thursday night.

Knoxville Police Department (KPD) hosted a town hall called, “Take a Stand Against Bullying” at South College in West Knoxville. It also aired on WBIR.

Keynote Speaker Kirk Smalley shared the story about the loss of his son, Ty Smalley. It was featured in the documentary “Bully.”

Ty, 11-years-old at the time, committed suicide in 2010.

Ty was suspended from school after retaliating against another student who had been bullying him for more than two years. Him mom, Laura Smalley, asked him to do his homework and chores.

“She found out that my baby didn’t do his homework and that he hadn’t done his chores. Instead, he’d killed himself on our bedroom floor,” Kirk Smalley said.

Shortly after Ty’s death, a group of students formed “Stand for the Silent.” It is a chance for the Smalleys to tell Ty’s story and raise awareness about bullying. In the last 18 months, Kirk has visited 837 schools and spoke to more than 800,000 kids.

“I made a promise… it was on Father’s Day. I promised Ty that day that I was going to stop bullying in this world… I don’t break promises to my boy,” Kirk said.

Many students in Knoxville can relate to Ty’s story.

Andres Trabal was verbally and physically bullied throughout elementary and middle school because he’s Hispanic.

“It just made me feel really bad, really separated from everyone else. I don’t know. It made me feel different. It made me feel like I needed to change to fit in with the crowd,” Trabal said.

Trabal decided to try homeschooling when he reached high school. He’s now in 11th grade.

“I really just didn’t want to deal with it anymore and I knew high school would be a lot worse,” he said.

Trabal said he attended the town hall because he wants to help others who have been bullied.

The second half of the town hall included a panel of speakers, who addressed the community’s questions on bullying.

http://www.wbir.com/story/news/local/west-knoxville-farragut/2014/04/17/town-hall-puts-spotlight-on-bullying-in-knoxville/7855589/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wbir%2Flocal-news+(WBIR+-+Local+News+Headlines)

at 5:22 pm

The Effects Of Childhood Bullying Can Last A Lifetime

A new study in the American Journal of Psychiatry finds what others had hinted at but not quite arrived at: That the effects of childhood bullying can last not only through adolescence and young adulthood, but also through middle age. Earlier studies had shown the negative psychological and social effects of bullying to be evident into a person’s 20s, but the new research tracked the psychological health and cognitive function of once-bullied kids till they were 50. And the effects of bullying – particularly of severe bullying – affected a person’s well-being in a great number of ways. All the more reason, the authors urge, to take bullying just as seriously as we would any other form of childhood abuse.

“Our study shows that the effects of bullying are still visible nearly four decades later,” said study author Ryu Takizawa of the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London. “The impact of bullying is persistent and pervasive, with health, social and economic consequences lasting well into adulthood.”

English: this is my own version of what bullyi... (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The study tracked over 7,700 children whose families were part of the British National Child Development Study, also known as the 1958 Birth Cohort Study, which captures data from all the children born within one week in 1958 in England, Scotland, and Wales. The parents provided information about the children, including any experiences with bullying, when they were 7 and 11 years old.

Over a quarter of the children in the study – 28% – had been bullied occasionally, and 15% bullied frequently, which the authors say is about what it is today.

The kids were followed as they aged, and asked about their mental health, social relationships, quality of life, and professional and economic situations.

It turned out that on almost every measure, people who’d been bullied as children had more problems across life. Being bullied either occasionally or frequently was linked to greater psychological distress at age 23 and age 50 – and being bullied frequently as a child was associated with greater risk for depression, anxiety, and suicidality at age 45. It was also linked to poorer cognitive function at age 50, which is a disturbing finding in itself. The authors suggest it may mirror the known link between childhood maltreatment and cognitive function or it could be a sign of early aging, both of which have been indicated by previous studies.

The team also found that frequent childhood bullying was linked to lower educational levels, a greater likelihood of being unemployed, and having a lower salary at age 50. People who had been bullied as children were also less likely to live with a partner or spouse at that age, less able to call on friends in the case of illness, and even less likely to have met up with friends in the recent past. People who had been bullied as kids were also not only less satisfied with their lives in the present, but they anticipated being less satisfied in the future, compared to non-bullied counterparts.

The results held strong even after the researchers controlled for potentially confounding factors like childhood IQ, the family’s socioeconomic status, and low parental involvement.

The question of why the effects of childhood bulling span the better part of a lifetime is not totally clear, but there are theories. The authors suggest that it may be that bullying creates a cycle of victimization that continues throughout life and impacts virtually every realm of life. Or it could be that the stress of being bullied “embeds” itself into the very genes, affecting the hormones and brain chemicals that govern the stress response, mood, and sensitivity to one’s environment.

The next step will be to find out what factors in life may reduce or amplify the lingering effects of bullying. “40 years is a long time,” says senior author Louise Arseneault, “so there will no doubt be additional experiences during the course of these young people’s lives which may either protect them against the effects of bullying, or make things worse. Our next step is to investigate what these are.”

But in the meantime, early intervention is key. The results, the authors say, are strong evidence that we need to take bullying even more seriously, since it’s no different from any other form of child abuse. ”We need to move away from any perception that bullying is just an inevitable part of growing-up,” said Arseneault. “Teachers, parents and policy-makers should be aware that what happens in the school playground can have long-term repercussions for children.” And it will be a joint project. Public and school programs can do their parts, but teaching our kids from the earliest age to treat peers with kindness and respect will be an equally important part of the process.

For more information on anti-bullying programs please see StopBullying.gov, StopBullyingNow.com, or stopbullyingnowfoundation.org, or pacer.org.

Follow me @alicewalton or find me on Facebook.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2014/04/18/the-effects-of-childhood-bullying-can-last-a-lifetime/

at 5:22 pm

Students: Cyberbullying is a serious problem

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

Cyberbullying is real and midstate students said they see it affecting classmates everyday.

PennLive recently visited Carlisle High School to get student perspectives on cyberbullying after they attended an assembly titled “Rachel’s Challenge,” which shared the story and writings of Rachel Scott. 

Scott was the first victim of the Columbine school shooting tragedy in 1999.

Three Carlisle High School students said they see cyberbullying happen all the time, and it spills into the halls and classes. 

Here is what they had to say: 

 

 

http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/04/cyberbullying_is_a_real_proble.html

at 5:22 pm

Cyberbullying leaves staggering statistics in its wake

Posted by in Cyber Bullying

Cyberbullying is a relatively new problem, having evolved with the Internet and development of social media websites and apps.

It’s easily as devastating as face-to-face bullying, if not more, and it’s slashing and burning through school districts across the U.S. 

More than half of the country’s young people have reported that they have been cyberbullied, and of the young people who reported cyberbullying incidents, one-third of them said their bullies issued online threats, according to 2014 bullying statistics published by anti-bullying website, nobullying.com.

The following are a list of staggering cyberbullying statistics compiled by nobullying.com.

  • 55 percent of all teenagers who use social media have witnessed cyberbullying.
  • 25 percent of teenagers report that they have experienced repeated bullying via cellphone or the Internet.
  • Embarrassing or damaging photographs taken without the knowledge or consent of the subject has been reported by 11 percent of adolescents and teens.
  • Of the young people who reported cyberbullying incidents against them, one-third (33 percent) of them reported that their bullies issued online threats.
  • Often, bullies and cyberbullies turn to hate speech to victimize their target. One-tenth of all middle school and high school students have been on the receiving end of “hate terms” hurled against them.
  • 95 percent of teens who witnessed bullying on social media report that others, like them, have ignored the behavior.
  • Victims of cyberbullying sometimes, in an attempt to fight back, can shift roles, becoming the aggressor. Often, this happens as a sort of back-and-forth between victim and aggressor which tends to continue the behavior.
  • More than half of young people surveyed say that they never confide in their parents when cyberbullying happens to them.
  • Only one out of six parents of adolescents and teens are even aware of the scope and intensity involved with cyber bullying.
  • More than 80 percent of teens regularly use cellphones, making them the most popular form of technology and therefore a common medium for cyberbullying.
  • About half of young people have experienced some form of cyberbullying; among them, between 10 percent and 20 percent experience cyberbullying regularly.
  • Girls are at least as likely as boys to either be cyberbullies or to be targeted as cyberbullying victims.
  • Boys are more likely to be threatened by cyberbullies than girls.
  • Cyberbullying affects all races.
  • Victims of cyberbullying are more likely to suffer from low self-esteem and to consider suicide as a result.

http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/04/cyberbullying_by_the_numbers.html