May 22, 2015 at 3:54 am

Daniel Cormier overcame bullying by learning how to wrestle

The UFC have provided an enticing snippet of Daniel Cormier’s ‘Fightography’ feature, which is available on Fight Pass as of today. The former Olympian discusses his life before his initiation into the combat sports realm and how getting through school was a struggle due to bullying. Other fighters have also been open about their experiences with bullying during their childhood, including Georges St-Pierre and Chris Weidman. The AKA standout opened up to the UFC:

“When I was a kid I had a bully – I think a lot of kids do, but it seemed like mine was excessive. One kid actually – one time he had an egg in his hand and he punched me with it, and I broke in my eye and I fell down…and I got up and I just left. I wouldn’t fight the kid. I had something, it was like a block, like I could not allow myself to stand up to this kid. I was one kid at home with my family, or with my friends, but anytime these other kids came around I was completely different. I was like, broken, you know – I was so scared of everything confrontational.

I was very hyper. I would run around and I would jump and do crazy stuff…One day me and my friend PJ – my cousin – we were kicking a football and at one point he got tired of retrieving it so he stood up for himself, so then him and I started fighting. The high school wrestling coach came over and was like ‘what are you doing’ and then he started talking to us about wrestling. That’s pretty much how I started wrestling, it’s crazy. It saved me from the last two years of middle school because every time someone tried to get me, I would take them down and I would beat them up, and then they just stopped and left me alone. From that day, I was like, ‘no one’s bullying me because I can stand up for myself’.”

Daniel Cormier will try to achieve his career-long dream of attaining UFC gold when he challenges Anthony Johnson for the light-heavyweight strap this Saturday at UFC 187.

http://www.bloodyelbow.com/2015/5/21/8633993/ufc-news-video-interview-daniel-cormier-overcame-bullying-wrestling-fightography-ufc-187

at 3:54 am

An In-depth Look at Nevada’s New Anti-bullying Law

We spoke with the Department of Education — to help break down the specifics of Nevada’s new anti-bullying law, which Governor Brian Sandoval signed into law on Wednesday. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates one in three students have been bullied at school. This new bill creates an office which deals specifically with school bullying cases and ways to combat the problem. 

Before Senate Bill 504, the governor’s office received letters from parents whose families have been torn apart by bullying. One read – “I’m a parent of a child who suffered months of severe verbal and physical abuse,” said Governor Sandoval. “On December 12th, 2013. A beautiful young girl took her life at the age of 13 because she was bullied to death.”

It was many cases like this that led lawmakers to take action against the growing problem of bullying. “Sadly I can no longer keep track of the number of suicides that have occurred on my watch,” said State Superintendent Dave Erquiaga.

With this new law, Erquiaga says there’s finally a better plan in place. He says the new legislation is one of the strongest bullying laws in the nation. “It does three things: it defines bullying for all of our schools so we all understand what that term means. It requires the department to set up an office of Safe and Respectful Learning and provide training to districts’ personnel and charter school personnel and it establishes a really clear complaint process,” said Erquiaga.

The superintendent further explains if a parent or guardian is concerned their student is being bullied, the school is required to investigate that claim very quickly. If parent aren’t satisfied with the investigation with the school, they can use the new department as a way to appeal cases. “If mom or dad goes through the process with their school district having filed a complaint about bullying and they’re still not satisfied, they can appeal to this department,” said Erquiaga.

The goal of the bill is also to explain that bullying doesn’t just take place in school, but through social media – where bullying can follow students at home. Teachers and school administrators will also receive training on how to identify signs of bullying.

Erquiaga says it’s going to cost up to $300,000 a year to fund this new department. The money will come from the general fund, pending the approval of the School Appropriations Act which funds all education programs. A social worker grant program is also part of the new legislation which costs just under $24 million. “We spend about $2.8 billion over the biennium on public education so this is a very small but crucial component of the entire budget,” said Erquiaga. It will have up to five staff members, including two new positions created in the governor’s budget to run programs and a complaint hotline.
    
The superintendent’s office will be in charge of oversight. With this new law, there’s more than just laying out the framework for bullying training. There’s also accountability with the schools. “This bill also clarifies that administrators and school staff can be disciplined if they don’t comply with a complaint and reporting investigation requirements. So we want to take this very seriously,” said Erquiaga.

The law goes into effect July 1st. That’s when a 24-hour hotline will open along with a complaint process to report bullying. Funding for the additional staff members will start in early October.

The Washoe County School District is also working on creating an anti-bullying app for students to report bullying in school.

http://www.ktvn.com/story/29130248/an-in-depth-look-at-the-new-nevada-anti-bullying-law

at 3:54 am

Anti-bullying movement has ignored Muslims

When I was a kid, bullying was often treated as an unhappy but inevitable part of childhood. I experienced it, and perpetuated it, without much intervention from adults. Recent documentaries like “Bully” and anti-bullying campaigns like Dan Savage’s It Gets Better Project have challenged conventional thinking and encouraged us to confront bullying as a cultural phenomenon.

Despite these shifts, some Muslim Americans in our region say they feel overlooked by these campaigns even as their children suffer regular harassment and bullying — often over their religion.

“Recently schools across America have taken a stronger stance against bullying,” says Maryam Hussain, a Bellevue College student who lives in Kirkland and says anti-bullying campaigns more often focus on race or sexual orientation than religion. “People are not using examples of bullying against Muslims.”

Hussain has plenty of examples. She first experienced bullying as an elementary-school student in a small town on the East Coast where a kid on the school bus, referencing her hijab, called her a “towel head” and a “terrorist.” During those same years, her younger sister was having her headscarf ripped off on the playground.

When the family moved to Kirkland, Hussain says, she thought her problems were over.

“I felt so relieved because everyone here is so accepting, and there’s such a diverse community,” says Hussain, but instead she was “surprised and shocked” when the harassment continued.

When she was a senior in high school, a fellow student ridiculed her headscarf in the hallway, telling her she didn’t have to “wear that stupid thing.” And just last week, her younger brother and sister were walking home from school when a car past them and the driver screamed a profanity and called them terrorists.

Unfortunately Hussain’s experiences aren’t unusual says Jeff Siddiqui. He’s a Lynnwood real-estate agent who became concerned with Islamophobic bullying when his daughter called him from her high school crying because of a lesson in her U.S. government class. Siddiqui says a teacher, while discussing the 9/11 attacks, warned his daughter’s class of “Muslim sleeper cells” and cautioned students to be “careful who you make friends with.”

He said his daughter felt singled out and stereotyped, insulted and embarrassed by the insinuation that any Muslim American could be an undercover terrorist.

“After 9/11, it was like being thrown head first into the ocean. You can no longer, as a Muslim, remain above the fray,” says Siddiqui. “That fire is lapping at your feet whether you like it or not.”

In response Siddiqui, along with the recently formed group United Muslims of Washington state, is sponsoring an anti-bullying event at Bellevue College this weekend called “Take A Stand.” There will be speakers from human- and civil-rights organizations, as well as a representative from the U.S. Department of Justice.

The goal, says Siddiqui, is to encourage Muslim students and families to learn about their rights and stand up against bullying and harassment.

“Most parents are first-generation immigrants in this country,” explains Siddiqui who adds that, in his experience, complaints about anti-Muslim bullying can be dismissed or downplayed, and families are often afraid to push the issue. “They have a fear of authority, and they don’t want to rock the boat.”

Twenty-year-old Hussain hopes the conference will help, but she has a longer term plan, too. She wants to be an elementary-school teacher and serve as a role model for a growing population of Muslim kids, while also helping non-Muslim students, parents and teachers learn more about her faith.

“They’ll be exposed by an early age to a Muslim girl, and they’ll know that we’re not all terrorists,” says Hussain. “We’re normal people.”

And like any normal people, their kids deserve protection against bullying, too.

The “Take A Stand” conference (free and open to the public) is Saturday, 2-5 p.m., in the Bellevue College cafeteria.

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/anti-bullying-movement-has-ignored-muslims/

May 21, 2015 at 9:54 pm

Parent sues school district over alleged bullying by coach

Parent sues school district over alleged bullying by coach

BY CHRIS MCGUINNESS

The parent of a former Nipomo High School student is suing the Lucia Mar Unified School District in federal court, claiming that a physical education coach forced her son into activities against the advice of doctors and later bullied the teen when she brought up the problems to school and district officials.

The lawsuit, filed Feb. 11, named the district and former Nipomo High School coach James Gross as defendants. At the crux of the suit are claims that Gross deprived the 16-year-old student of his rights under federal disability laws and put the student’s physical and mental health at risk.

The alleged harassment began during the 2013-2014 school year. The student, then a sophomore, was identified by the district as a disabled. The teen suffered from ADHD and a heart condition that causes shortness of breath and chest pains.

Despite the condition, the boy was still able to participate in sports and exercise and was a member of the school’s water polo and wrestling teams. The lawsuit stated that the student’s doctor had advised him to self-monitor and limit his activities should the symptoms begin to occur.

Gross was the student’s P.E. coach that year. One week early in the school year, students were running in hot weather. The sophomore began experiencing chest pains, and he started to walk, according to the lawsuit. Gross allegedly told the student that he was required to run. When the student told him about his condition, as well as a written plan with the school district that laid out his conditions and the accommodations under the auspices of the Federal Americans With Disabilities Act, Gross reportedly said that he didn’t care and expected him to “fully participate” until he got a note from a doctor, the lawsuit stated.

The student went to his mother, Pamela Webb, who took the matter to school officials. Eventually, a note, which the lawsuit claims was already on file with the school and a part of the student’s written plan, was given to Gross.

After the initial spat, the lawsuit claims that Gross bullied and harassed the student on several other occasions. The alleged retaliation included Gross getting the boy cut from the high school’s wrestling team, which he coached. In January 2014, he reportedly encouraged other students on the team to demote the teen from varsity to junior varsity, and strip him of his varsity letter. The teammates complied, and voted him off the varsity team.

As the conflict escalated, Gross allegedly continued to bully the student, at one point reportedly asking him when he was going to “fight his own battles,” according to the lawsuit.

Gross was removed from his position as the school’s wresting coach. Within days of a new coach being appointed, the team appeared in a Facebook photo wearing bright-yellow T-shirts proclaiming “bring back coach Gross.” Gross didn’t return as coach, and the student, on advice of the school’s principal, refrained from participating in wrestling.

The student is no longer on campus, and now participates in an independent study program in lieu of attending high school. The lawsuit claims that the harassment and hostility took a physical and mental toll on the young man, who began passing out toward the end of the school year.

“[The student] has suffered and continues to suffer severe emotional distress, requiring psychological care,” the suit states.

Gross is gone from Nipomo High, but not from the district itself. A district spokesperson confirmed that Gross was still employed with the district, but said LMUSD could not comment further on the lawsuit. The district’s website states that Gross is now employed as a P.E. coach at Arroyo Grande High School. He’s not listed as a coach for any of the school’s athletics teams.

According to the lawsuit, this isn’t the first time Gross has run into trouble at other campuses within the district. The suit alleges that Gross has “demonstrated an inability to work with and properly accommodate disabled individuals” in violation of state and federal laws.

Webb’s attorney, Robert May, didn’t provide a comment on the allegations to New Times in time for publication.

Judy McKelvey, Gross’ attorney, didn’t comment on the specific allegations of the lawsuit.

“Mr. Gross has always acted with the intent to act in his students’ best interest,” she said.

While Gross and his attorney were reticent to speak to New Times, several parents of his former NHS wrestling students spoke in his support. Parent Lonnie Rodriguez called the allegations against Gross “unfair.”

“He never had an issue with his students,” Rodriguez said. “There’s plenty of people who know him, and they know he’s a great guy who’s really dedicated to his students.”

Court records show that the lawsuit is ongoing. Gross has until June 8 to answer the complaint against him.

The lawsuit not only asks the court to award monetary damages, but calls for requiring the district to develop and implement policies to educate employees on federal disability laws, and provide disabled students with equal opportunities in physical education an extracurricular activities.

 

Staff Writer Chris McGuinness can be reached at cmcguinness@newtimesslo.com.

http://www.newtimesslo.com/news/12374/parent-sues-school-district-over-alleged-bullying-by-coach/

at 9:54 pm

Kansas mom reports bullying at Catholic school — so principal accuses her of …

A Kansas woman said school administrators got a child abuse investigation launched against her after she reported that her daughter had been bullied.

Melissa Schroeder filed a defamation lawsuit last week against the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Kansas City, Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Shawnee, and the school’s principal, reported KSHB-TV.

Schroeder said she reported the bullying in April 2014, and she provided notes from a doctor who found the 10-year-old girl’s severe migraines may have been the result of mistreatment at school.

But the principal did not take the claims seriously, according to the suit – and told the woman that “perhaps this school is not for you.”

The Kansas Department of Children and Families opened a child abuse and neglect investigation against Schroeder – which she says was launched by a complaint filed by the principal.

The suit claims the principal told DCF that Schroeder asked “for the anointing of the sick” and “requested an exorcism” – but the woman denies making those requests.

She met with a priest to discuss the situation, and he confirmed the principal had made the DCF complaint after meeting with the superintendent and a nun.

The DCF investigation was closed after finding no signs of abuse and neglect, said Schroeder’s attorney.

Schroeder’s suit seeks punitive damages for defamation, malicious prosecution, and invasion of privacy.

The archdiocese declined to comment on the lawsuit.

Watch this video report posted online by KSHB-TV:

http://www.rawstory.com/2015/05/kansas-mom-reports-bullying-at-catholic-school-so-principal-accuses-her-of-child-abuse-suit/

at 9:53 pm

Sunrise Elementary School students march against bullying

Schools throughout Florida have been trying to find new ways to crack down on bullying.

Officials at Sunrise Elementary School said they’ve made great strides in their anti-bullying program called Positive Actions Lift (PAL).

Students said they have seen a big difference since the program was initiated.

The program has only been in place for a year at Sunrise Elementary in Kissimmee, but the staff and students said they have proof that it’s working.


Raw: Elementary students march against bullying


The students spent the morning celebrating their success, holding up anti-bullying signs and parading from their classrooms through the halls and outside on the campus.

Every month, one student from each class is recognized for being kind and helpful to other students.

“It’s actually really good that we’re doing this because there are so many bullies here in fifth-grade, and it’s just, like, hard some kids are being, like, discouraged and some of them are having fights and things. So, we should keep going on with this bullying program so that we can keep this going,” said student Adriana Rivera.

The numbers from the Stop Bullying Now Foundation show why efforts like this are so important for schools across the country.

Sixty-percent of middle school students said they’ve been bullied, and 160,000 students stay home from school every day because of bullying.

Thirty-percent of students who reported they’d been bullied said they’ve brought weapons to school.

A Polk County mother has been pushing for a specific anti-bullying legislation in Florida since her daughter committed suicide.

The goal is to change attitudes while the students are still young.

“It’s been really good. It’s been teaching other kids to respect others,” Hernandez said.

More than 450 children were recognized in the PAL program this school year at Sunrise Elementary.

http://www.wftv.com/news/news/local/sunrise-elementary-school-students-march-against-b/nmLkN/

at 3:54 pm

Facebook Bullying Publishers Into Faustian Bargains With Instant Articles?

InstantArticlesiOSArticleTeaser

Facebook’s Instant Articles launched last week — a partnership between the social networking giant and publishers to provide tailored content encapsulated within the Facebook app. In the wake of this announcement, there has been some criticism that Facebook wants to take control of the internet, and these claims aren’t completely without basis.

While some publishers see the new partnership as a faster and easier way to reach Facebook users, others are concerned that the agreement is at odds with Net Neutrality. Indeed, the biggest perk of this agreement is that Instant Content will load “ten times faster than standard mobile web articles.”

This is precisely the kind of arrangement Net Neutrality advocates have been fighting against. Facebook and other social media networks have already shifted to a pay-to-play system, and more and more people are turning to Facebook to find their news. How will Instant impact the balance of the publishing ecosystem?

Media analyst Michael Ingram wrote about this arrangement in March, noting that the Facebook algorithm gave the network the upper hand, particularly when it came to which content its users would see.

While Facebook could presumably use its news-feed ranking algorithm to recommend more stories and content from its partners (an aspect of the deal that other publishers are undoubtedly also thinking about), the details of whose content gets recommended and when would be totally under Facebook’s control.

But this isn’t just a concern for publishers, it’s potentially a concern for users who may not be aware of how the algorithm filters what they see.

[T]he view they have of the world is being distorted in some way, but they don’t really have any idea how or why. That’s more than a little troubling, and the new arrangement Facebook is talking about would expand that problem even further.

Beyond the filter effect, PandoDaily contributor David Holmes notes that Facebook has a history of using “bait and switch tactics.”

For many years, it was not uncommon for the platform to prioritize stories shared by news organizations in News Feeds. But as these news outlets became more and more reliant on traffic from Facebook, the platform has continued to make these stories a lower and lower priority for its algorithms, thus greatly limiting users’ exposure to them.

These are all valid concerns that Facebook will shrug off under the guise of doing what’s best for its users. But Snapchat offered publishers a similar partnership recently in the name of security and control over its internal ecosystem. The biggest question is who do these arrangements benefit most? The publishers or the networks?

http://www.adweek.com/socialtimes/facebook-bullying-publishers-into-faustian-bargains-with-instant-articles/620555

at 3:54 pm

Facebook Bullying Publishers Into Faustian Bargains With Instant Articles?

InstantArticlesiOSArticleTeaser

Facebook’s Instant Articles launched last week — a partnership between the social networking giant and publishers to provide tailored content encapsulated within the Facebook app. In the wake of this announcement, there has been some criticism that Facebook wants to take control of the internet, and these claims aren’t completely without basis.

While some publishers see the new partnership as a faster and easier way to reach Facebook users, others are concerned that the agreement is at odds with Net Neutrality. Indeed, the biggest perk of this agreement is that Instant Content will load “ten times faster than standard mobile web articles.”

This is precisely the kind of arrangement Net Neutrality advocates have been fighting against. Facebook and other social media networks have already shifted to a pay-to-play system, and more and more people are turning to Facebook to find their news. How will Instant impact the balance of the publishing ecosystem?

Media analyst Michael Ingram wrote about this arrangement in March, noting that the Facebook algorithm gave the network the upper hand, particularly when it came to which content its users would see.

While Facebook could presumably use its news-feed ranking algorithm to recommend more stories and content from its partners (an aspect of the deal that other publishers are undoubtedly also thinking about), the details of whose content gets recommended and when would be totally under Facebook’s control.

But this isn’t just a concern for publishers, it’s potentially a concern for users who may not be aware of how the algorithm filters what they see.

[T]he view they have of the world is being distorted in some way, but they don’t really have any idea how or why. That’s more than a little troubling, and the new arrangement Facebook is talking about would expand that problem even further.

Beyond the filter effect, PandoDaily contributor David Holmes notes that Facebook has a history of using “bait and switch tactics.”

For many years, it was not uncommon for the platform to prioritize stories shared by news organizations in News Feeds. But as these news outlets became more and more reliant on traffic from Facebook, the platform has continued to make these stories a lower and lower priority for its algorithms, thus greatly limiting users’ exposure to them.

These are all valid concerns that Facebook will shrug off under the guise of doing what’s best for its users. But Snapchat offered publishers a similar partnership recently in the name of security and control over its internal ecosystem. The biggest question is who do these arrangements benefit most? The publishers or the networks?

http://www.adweek.com/socialtimes/facebook-bullying-publishers-into-faustian-bargains-with-instant-articles/620555

at 3:53 pm

New data show a decline in school-based bullying

WASHINGTON, D.C. (WDAM) –

This is a news release from the U.S. Department of Education.


New data indicate the first significant decrease in school-based bullying since the federal government began collecting that data in 2005, suggesting that efforts at the federal, state and local levels to prevent bullying may be paying off. According to new data from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent for the past decade.

“As schools become safer, students are better able to thrive academically and socially,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. “The Department, along with our federal partners and others, has been deeply involved in the fight against bullying in our nation’s schools. Even though we’ve come a long way over the past few years in educating the public about the health and educational impacts that bullying can have on students, we still have more work to do to ensure the safety of our nation’s children.”

“The report brings welcome news,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell said. “Parents, teachers, health providers, community members and young people are clearly making a difference by taking action and sending the message that bullying is not acceptable. We will continue to do our part at HHS to help ensure every child has the opportunity to live, learn and grow in a community free of bullying.”

In 2011, the President and First Lady hosted the first White House Conference on Bullying Prevention where they called for a united effort to address bullying. As the President declared then, “Bullying can have destructive consequences for our young people. And it’s not something we have to accept. As parents and students; teachers and communities, we can take steps that will help prevent bullying and create a climate in our schools in which all of our children can feel safe.” To address the scourge of bullying, the federal government has implemented a suite of executive and public-private partnerships that are helping move to move the needle and reduce incidences of bullying.

In 2013, about 22 percent of students ages 12 to 18 reported being bullied at school during the school year. According to NCES data, this percentage was lower than the percentage reported in every prior survey year since 2005 (when it ranged from 28 to 32 percent). Similarly, lower percentages of students reporting being bullied in 2013 were observed across some student characteristics. For example, in 2013 about 24 percent of female students reported being bullied at school, compared with 29 to 33 percent in prior survey years. While girls ages 12 to 18 tend to report being bullied more than males the same age, the data shows that the pattern of reduced rates over time for males was similar. In 2013, females also reported being cyberbullied more than males. Nine percent of females reported that they were cyberbullied compared with 5 percent of males. The data comes from the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, which asks a nationally representative sample of students ages 12—18 if they had been bullied at school.

There are three types of bullying: physical, relational (or social) and verbal. Bullying of any type can occur anywhere and to any student. Research shows that students who are bullied are more likely to struggle in school and skip class. They are more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, be depressed, and are at higher risk of suicide.

Since 2010, the Education Department has taken actions to combat bullying and cyberbullying. The Department’s efforts include:

Copyright 2015 WDAM. All rights reserved.

http://www.nbc12.com/story/29123036/new-data-show-a-decline-in-school-based-bullying

at 3:53 pm

New data show a decline in school-based bullying

WASHINGTON, D.C. (WDAM) –

This is a news release from the U.S. Department of Education.


New data indicate the first significant decrease in school-based bullying since the federal government began collecting that data in 2005, suggesting that efforts at the federal, state and local levels to prevent bullying may be paying off. According to new data from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent for the past decade.

“As schools become safer, students are better able to thrive academically and socially,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. “The Department, along with our federal partners and others, has been deeply involved in the fight against bullying in our nation’s schools. Even though we’ve come a long way over the past few years in educating the public about the health and educational impacts that bullying can have on students, we still have more work to do to ensure the safety of our nation’s children.”

“The report brings welcome news,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell said. “Parents, teachers, health providers, community members and young people are clearly making a difference by taking action and sending the message that bullying is not acceptable. We will continue to do our part at HHS to help ensure every child has the opportunity to live, learn and grow in a community free of bullying.”

In 2011, the President and First Lady hosted the first White House Conference on Bullying Prevention where they called for a united effort to address bullying. As the President declared then, “Bullying can have destructive consequences for our young people. And it’s not something we have to accept. As parents and students; teachers and communities, we can take steps that will help prevent bullying and create a climate in our schools in which all of our children can feel safe.” To address the scourge of bullying, the federal government has implemented a suite of executive and public-private partnerships that are helping move to move the needle and reduce incidences of bullying.

In 2013, about 22 percent of students ages 12 to 18 reported being bullied at school during the school year. According to NCES data, this percentage was lower than the percentage reported in every prior survey year since 2005 (when it ranged from 28 to 32 percent). Similarly, lower percentages of students reporting being bullied in 2013 were observed across some student characteristics. For example, in 2013 about 24 percent of female students reported being bullied at school, compared with 29 to 33 percent in prior survey years. While girls ages 12 to 18 tend to report being bullied more than males the same age, the data shows that the pattern of reduced rates over time for males was similar. In 2013, females also reported being cyberbullied more than males. Nine percent of females reported that they were cyberbullied compared with 5 percent of males. The data comes from the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, which asks a nationally representative sample of students ages 12—18 if they had been bullied at school.

There are three types of bullying: physical, relational (or social) and verbal. Bullying of any type can occur anywhere and to any student. Research shows that students who are bullied are more likely to struggle in school and skip class. They are more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, be depressed, and are at higher risk of suicide.

Since 2010, the Education Department has taken actions to combat bullying and cyberbullying. The Department’s efforts include:

Copyright 2015 WDAM. All rights reserved.

http://www.nbc12.com/story/29123036/new-data-show-a-decline-in-school-based-bullying

at 9:53 am

Students ‘black out bullying’ in Desert Hot Springs


DESERT HOT SPRINGS, Calif. –

Johnny Murphy is a seventh grader at Desert Springs Middle School. He said he’s faced bullies since kindergarten.

“I see it and I’ve experienced it,” said Murphy.

“PE was the worst. Everything happened there,” said Diane Murphy, Johnny’s grandmother.

Johnny’s grandmother reported the issues to the school and had him removed from PE.

The 12-year-old confronted Desert Hot Springs City Council members about bullying and it’s link to suicide, voicing his efforts to help those targeted online and at his school.

Down the road, Painted Hills Middle School in Desert Hot Springs launched an anti-bullying campaign with “Black Out Bullying” Wednesdays.

“We’re wearing black because we are against bullying. We believe it affects people’s lives,” said eighth grader Micco Gollette.

The campaign calls for school counselors to visit classrooms each month to educate students on the consequences of bullying. Students will write and perform bullying skits that are performed during the monthly Panther assembly starting Friday. Safe classrooms will be open for students who want to speak with a trusted teacher rather than an administrator. Parent involvement will be mandated at the school.

“If we change the culture on campus where students are part of the solution, we’ll do a really good job of addressing the bullying issue we’re dealing with on campus,” said principal Dr. Michael Greinger.

The hope is for the campaign to spread like wildfire across the school district and the Coachella Valley.

“I would tell the bullies it’s wrong what they’re doing and they don’t know how much they’re hurting other people,” said Johnny.

http://www.kesq.com/news/students-black-out-bullying-in-desert-hot-springs/33135648

at 9:53 am

House Republicans vote down anti-bullying proposal

DES MOINES — A package of anti-bullying programs and provisions designed for Iowa’s public schools was narrowly defeated Wednesday night in the Iowa House.

Rep. Chris Hall, D-Sioux City, introduced the anti-bullying legislation and pleaded with lawmakers for its passage. It was voted down, 50-46.

The anti-bullying proposal for three years has been a priority of Republican Gov. Terry Branstad, who invited an Edgewood-Colesburg student to speak on the issue in front of lawmakers around the time of January’s Condition of the State address. It passed with bipartisan support in the Democrat-controlled Senate, 43-7, in March.

The legislation has idled ever since in the House, where leaders declined to bring it to the floor for a debate and vote.

Hall on Wednesday night called up the legislation as an amendment to a catchall bill containing funding and policy.

“It is our obligation to address this,” Hall said. “It is overdue.”

The legislation allows schools to address incidents that occur off-grounds and online, and requires parental notification except for when the victim or school officials fear further harm.

Five House Republicans joined 41 House Democrats in supporting the anti-bullying proposal. Among them was Rep. Ron Jorgensen, R-Sioux City, who is chairman of the House Education Committee and a former Sioux City School Board member.

The measure was opposed by 50 House Republicans.

Four members — two from each party — were absent.

Rep. Chuck Soderberg, R-Le Mars, urged his colleagues to oppose the measure, citing concerns the expansion of school authority off school grounds could interfere with law enforcement. He also said schools have told him they already are doing everything they can to address bullying.

A spokesman for Branstad said the governor remains hopeful the legislation will pass, which could still happen should the original stand-alone bill come up for debate, or as part of the Senate standings bill, which is headed to a conference committee.

“The governor believes that every child in Iowa deserves a safe and respectful learning environment, and the anti-bullying bill, which passed on a bipartisan 43-7 vote in the Senate, is a strong piece of legislation to protect our children,” Branstad spokesman Jimmy Centers said in an email.

http://www.kcrg.com/subject/news/government/house-republicans-vote-down-anti-bullying-proposal-20150520

at 9:53 am

Childhood Bullying Victims Are More Likely To Be Overweight And Ill As Adults

By Kate Kelland
LONDON (Reuters) – Victims of childhood bullying are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults and have a higher risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses, according to a study by British psychiatrists.
Researchers found that just over a quarter of women who were occasionally or frequently bullied as children were obese at age 45, compared to 19 percent of those who had never been bullied.
And both men and women who were bullied as children had higher levels of fat around their middle — a known risk factor for heart disease.
“Bullying is bad for your physical health, whether you’re a man or a woman,” said Andrea Danese, who worked on the study at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology Neuroscience at King’s College London.
Louise Arseneault, who led the research, said its findings should remind teachers, parents and carers to think about the victims, not just worry about how to stop the bullies.
Bullying is characterized by repeated hurtful actions by other children, against which the victims find it difficult to defend themselves, she told reporters. Unfortunately, bullying was “part of growing up for many children”, she said.
“We tend to neglect the victims and their suffering,” she added. “(Yet) for some children, they will be marked for the rest of their lives.”
Arseneault’s findings, published on Wednesday in the journal Psychological Medicine, come from the British National Child Development Study which has data on all children born in England, Scotland and Wales during one week in 1958.
It included 7,102 children whose parents gave information on their child’s exposure to bullying at age 7 and 11. Some 28 percent had been bullied occasionally and 15 percent were bullied frequently. The children were then followed up at age 45, when measures of blood inflammation and obesity were recorded.
Besides obesity, the results showed that being bullied also led to higher levels of blood inflammation by the age 45.
Some 20 percent of those who were frequently bullied had high levels of a substance called C-reactive protein (CRP). High CRP raises heart disease risk by increasing atherosclerosis, where arteries get clogged up with fatty deposits.
Danese said the effects of childhood bullying on the risk of poor health in adulthood are relatively small compared to factors such as smoking, diet and exercise, but stressed that because obesity and bullying are both common, tackling them could have a significant health impact.

(Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/20/childhood-bullying-longterm-effects_n_7338146.html

at 9:53 am

Police Called to Intervene in Modesto Area High School Fights

Posted by in School

MODESTO-

It was one fight after another. Students say it was chaotic and officers had to roll on campus to get everyone under control on Wednesday.

The aftermath after a cluster of fights is caught on video. Students walking out of Grace Davis High School in Modesto after a day of violence and Modesto PD motorcycle officers driving on campus to take control.

“This is unusual. Like you see a fight every few weeks, maybe at most, but like for all this to happen in just a few minutes,” Chad Cooper, a junior at Davis High, said.

“It was crazy. I didn’t like it,” Maylah Sanders, another junior said.

The incident prompted school administrators to call police for help. Modesto City Schools said officers responded to the school’s quad during lunch within minutes.

While a couple of students had to be treated for minor injuries, others were detained for questioning.

“I was just wondering what was happening, like, I didn’t know if it was random or if it was planned,” Cooper said.

The school district was forced to put the school on lockdown. They also staggered release times to help curb potential violence.

“Could have been worse. It could have been a lot worse,” Sanders said.

A visible police presence remained at the school throughout the day as parents picked up their kids earlier than usual.

Modesto Police said no weapons were involved.

http://fox40.com/2015/05/20/police-called-to-intervene-in-modesto-area-high-school-fights/

at 9:53 am

Witnesses: School nurse yells profanity, racial slur at 6th grader – WXIA

Posted by in School

CLAYTON COUNTY, Ga. — Students are accusing a school nurse of using profanity and a racial slur against a sixth-grader in the cafeteria.

In witness statements, six children and three adults described what happened after 11-year-old Jason Ezzard and another boy threw a bag of chips back and forth at Mundy’s Mill Middle School.

Citing privacy concerns, Clayton County will not release the surveillance video to Ezzard or 11Alive, but the witness statements paint the picture of a violent confrontation.

“Degrading. Very degrading,” said Jason’s mother, Tormeka Ezzard. “‘I’m going to [expletive] you up’ — you’re talking to an 11-year-old. ‘I’m going to your [expletive] lights out.’ You’re talking to an 11-year-old!”

According to the statements, school nurse Beverly Barnes approached Jason and started yelling. Written reports by the principal of the school say Barnes yelled expletives at him and used a racial slur before another teacher intervened.

Ezzard held her breath watching video of the confrontation between the school nurse and her young son.

“My heart, I swear, was going 100 miles per hour, and I had to remind myself to breathe,” she said.

After an investigation, Barnes was suspended for two days, but Jason’s mother said that’s not enough.

“She’s abused my child physically, mentally, and verbally, and no one will help me,” Tormeka Ezzard said.

Ezzard is calling on the school to reopen the investigation and hold the nurse accountable.

“If it would’ve been the other way around, Jason would have been locked up, on the spot,” she said. “I would have been going to pick my child up at the Clayton County Juvenile Detention Center. What makes her any different from Jason?”

The school said the punishment was appropriate because Barnes did not have any previous complaints against her. School officials said they will provide 11Alive a copy of the internal investigation into the incident.

http://www.11alive.com/story/news/local/riverdale-jonesboro/2015/05/19/clayton-county-nurse-profanity-sixth-grader/27585551/

at 9:53 am

Concussion Lawsuits Rankle School Groups

Posted by in School

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http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/21/sports/football/concussion-lawsuits-rankle-school-groups.html

at 3:53 am

FSU Athletes Talk to Kids About Bullying Prevention – WBOY

Fairmont, WV –
Fairmont State University student athletes visited Watson Elementary School on Wednesday to address the issue of bullying.  

While visiting the school, the athletes read the children a story and the students watched a video about preventing bullying. 

“First off, I don’t think kids realize they’re doing it for the most part, and, to see the video for the third and fourth grade of the child who was getting picked on, it actually just really opened their eyes that this is happening,” Russell, one of the organizers for the presentation, said. “The story for the little ones is to help try and prevent some of the bullying.” 

Bullying occurs throughout the country. Nearly half of students from the fourth grade through high school report being bullied at least once a month.  

http://www.wboy.com/story/29117987/fsu-athletes-talk-to-kids-about-bullying-prevention

at 3:53 am

Henrico mother says she reported bullying before fight

HENRICO, VA (WWBT) –

A fight among Henrico high school students was caught on camera, and a mother said her son was caught in it due to bullying.

The Hermitage High School student’s mother said her son is now left with a concussion, in-school suspension, and even some fear.

Latonya and Contee Smithers responded to video of a fight involving their son Joshua after getting off the school bus Friday. Contee said it’s “hard to look at.”
 
At first glance Joshua is seen beating another student, but the video also shows him taking a few hits himself. He can also be heard pleading for the kids to leave him alone.
 
Contee claimed his son was defending himself.
The parents say it’s a situation that came after days of alleged bullying on the school bus. 
 
“This was a day to day almost occurrence,” said Latonya.
 
Latonya says she went to the schools administration to report the bullying a day before the fight broke out.
 
“In my opinion the school didn’t do enough,” said Contee.
 
It’s a situation Henrico Public Schools spokesperson Andy Jenks couldn’t talk about directly because of confidentiality but says every report is taken seriously.
 
“If concerns come forward to the school division we have an obligation to look into them,” said Jenks.
 
That includes several approaches, as outlined in the school code of conduct, including sitting down with the students and parents involved and several levels of disciplinary action. Jenks said school counselors provide lessons on how to identify signs of bullying and how to respond appropriately
 
“We don’t want anyone feeling like they can’t discuss it. If they have concerns we want to know about them,” said Jenks.

Jenks tells students and parents that if a child feels bullied or threatened in any way to report it immediately, which can be done anonymously online.

Copyright 2015 WWBT NBC12. All rights reserved.

http://www.nbc12.com/story/29116505/henrico-mother-says-she-reported-bullying-before-fight

at 3:53 am

House Republicans vote down anti-bullying proposal

DES MOINES — A package of anti-bullying programs and provisions designed for Iowa’s public schools was narrowly defeated Wednesday night in the Iowa House.

Rep. Chris Hall, D-Sioux City, introduced the anti-bullying legislation and pleaded with lawmakers for its passage. It was voted down, 50-46.

The anti-bullying proposal for three years has been a priority of Republican Gov. Terry Branstad. It passed with bipartisan support in the Democrat-controlled Senate, 43-7, in March.

The legislation has idled ever since in the House, where leaders declined to bring it to the floor for a debate and vote.

Hall on Wednesday night called up the legislation as an amendment to a catch-all bill containing funding and policy.

“It is our obligation to address this,” Hall said. “It is overdue.”

The legislation allows schools to address incidents that occur off-grounds and online, and requires parental notification except for when the victim or school officials fear for further harm, among other measures.

Five House Republicans joined 41 House Democrats in supporting the anti-bullying proposal. Among them was Rep. Ron Jorgensen, R-Sioux City, who is chairman of the House Education Committee and a former Sioux City School Board member.

The measure was opposed by 50 House Republicans.

Four members — two from each party — were absent.

Rep. Chuck Soderberg, R-Le Mars, urged his colleagues to oppose the measure, citing concerns the expansion of school authority off school grounds could interfere with law enforcement. He also said schools have told him they are already doing everything they can to address bullying.

A spokesman for Branstad said the governor remains hopeful the legislation will pass this session.

“The governor believes that every child in Iowa deserves a safe and respectful learning environment, and the anti-bullying bill, which passed on a bipartisan 43-7 vote in the Senate, is a strong piece of legislation to protect our children,” Branstad spokesman Jimmy Centers said in an email.

http://qctimes.com/news/local/government-and-politics/house-republicans-vote-down-anti-bullying-proposal/article_140b2176-3d06-59f1-b16a-b141520a8487.html

May 20, 2015 at 9:53 pm

‘Inspiring Project’ Receives Anti-Bullying Award

GREENWOOD, Del.- The Inspiring Project started as an Instagram post, turned into a wall containing 800 index cards and now is receiving awards from The Division of Prevention and Behavioral Health Services in Delaware.

Chase Marvil, an upperclassman at Woodbridge High, started “The Inspiring Project” to do just that, inspire as many people as possible including peers, adults and family members.

This project started from what many people considered “inspiring Instagram posts” in December 2013. Marvil said many peers reached out to him after this post asking for advice, looking for someone to chat with or even just to thank him for sharing some kind words.

On Wednesday afternoon, Marvil and a few of his peers who have helped him with the inspiring project, received an anti-bullying award from Pamela Louie, on behalf of the Division of Prevention and Behavioral Health Services, as well as a big green mascot named Jurdy who is apart of SHOUT b cause, LLC.

Louie says through the organization they focus on things like substance abuse prevention, bullying prevention and suicide prevention.

“We know that youth listen to youth and I think it is very powerful,” Louie said.

Marvil said he spreads his positivity and helpfulness over social media with the help of Twitter and Instagram.

This project has caused peers to tweet inspiring messages with the hashtag #theinspiringproject as well as the creation of a wall in the school showcasing more than 800 inspiring quotes.

Marvil’s main goal is to reach out to people and add some positivity into their lives.

“I want to help teens and even adults feel like they have more opportunities in life,” Marvil said.

Marvil plans to continue this project throughout high school and after he graduates. This project is something that Marvil, as well as the administration, hopes will continue each year.

The Inspiring Project has also touched lives outside of Delaware, according to Marvil, who said he has been contacted by people from California and even Canada.

“I have heard from people I never would have expected to hear from,” he said.

As well as inspiring tweets and index cards, Marvil began selling bracelets for $5 each.

“I’ve been selling those to people from across the nation, they’ve been buying them, and I’ve made my donation of $100 to the foundation of a Better Tomorrow, and I’m hoping I can get more money from these bands to donate more money from him,” Marvil said.

For more information on The Inspiring Project or how you can help this cause, visit www.facebook.com/theinspiringproject.

http://www.wboc.com/story/29117720/inspiring-project-receives-anti-bullying-award

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